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West Virginia State Profile Fiscal Year 2010

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Sexuality Education Law and Policy | Recent Legislation | Youth Sexual Health Data | Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative | Personal Responsibility Education Program | Title V Abstinence-Only Program | TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only Funding in FY 2010 | Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education | Points of Contact | Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education | Media Outlets | References

 
West Virginia
 
In Fiscal Year 2010[1], the state of West Virginia received:
  • Personal Responsibility Education Program funds totaling $276,094
  • Title V State Abstinence Education Program funds totaling $313,767
 
In Fiscal Year 2010, local entities in West Virginia received:
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative funds totaling $1,764,347
 
Sexuality Education Law and Policy
West Virginia law does not require schools to teach sexuality education, but does require HIV/AIDS-prevention education in grades six through 12.[2] According to the West Virginia Board of Education’s AIDS Education Policy, “[t]he goal of this policy is to assist in the protection of students by providing them with the knowledge and skills necessary to avoid behaviors that will put them at the risk of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).”            [3] Each county board must integrate HIV-prevention education into health courses and may also include it in “science, social studies and developmental guidance” courses in order to “assure total understanding of the disease and its consequences.”[4]  Educators conducting classroom instruction about HIV/AIDS must be qualified professionals who participate in staff development to ensure they teach current AIDS information.[5]
 
West Virginia does not require any specific curriculum; however, the Board of Education’s 21st Century Health Education 5-12 Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools curriculum framework includes sexuality education.
 
Parents or guardians may remove their children from any part of this instruction by written notification to the principal.[6] This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

See West Virginia Code §18-2-9West Virginia Board of Education Policies 2422.4, 2422.45, and 2520.5; and 21st Century Health Education 5-12 Content Standards and Objectives for West Virginia Schools
 
 
 
Recent Legislation
 
Bill Requiring Instruction on Fetal Development
House Bill 2134, introduced in January 2011, would have required all high school health classes to include instruction on fetal development. The State Board of Education would have been responsible for determining a curriculum for such instruction, with advice from the State Superintendent. The bill specified that the measure in no way endorses, allows, permits, or approves of abortion. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Education, where it died.
 
 
 
Youth Sexual Health Data
SIECUS has compiled the following data to provide an overview of adolescent sexual health in West Virginia. The data collected represents the most current information available.
 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) Data[7]
  • In 2009, 55% of female high school students and 54% of male high school students in West Virginia reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 5% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in West Virginia reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 15% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in West Virginia reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 42% of female high school students and 38% of male high school students in West Virginia reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 48% of females and 61% of males in West Virginia reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 26% of females and 20% of males in West Virginia reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 20% of females and 25% of males in West Virginia reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 86% of high school students in West Virginia reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • West Virginia’s teen birth rate currently ranks 17th in the United States, with a rate of 48.8 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 41.5 births per 1,000.[8] In 2008, there were a total of 2,633 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in West Virginia.[9]
     
  • In 2005, West Virginia’s teen pregnancy rate ranked 27th in the United States, with a rate of 62 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[10]  There were a total of 3,470 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in West Virginia.[11]
     
  • In 2005, West Virginia’s teen abortion rate ranked 44th in the United States, with a rate of 9 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000.[12]
 
HIV and AIDS
  • West Virginia’s HIV infection rate ranks 27th in the United States, with a rate of 6.1 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 19.5 cases per 100,000.[13]
 
  • West Virginia ranks 30st in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 111 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in West Virginia.[14]
     
  • West Virginia’s HIV infection rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 31st in the United States, with a rate of 2.1 cases per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 9.1 cases per 100,000.[15]
     
  • West Virginia ranks 37th in number of reported AIDS cases in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 81 new AIDS cases reported in West Virginia.[16]
     
  • West Virginia’s AIDS rate ranks 35th in the United States, with a rate of 4.5 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 12.3 cases per 100,000.[17]
     
  • West Virginia’s AIDS rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 35th in the United States, with a rate of 0.6 cases per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 1.8 cases per 100,000.[18]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • West Virginia ranks 47th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 10.21 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 1,199 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in West Virginia.[19] 
     
  • West Virginia ranks 38th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 1.49 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 175 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in West Virginia.[20] 
     
  • West Virginia ranks 23rd in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 0.02 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000.[21]
 
 
 
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
The President’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI) funds medically accurate and age-appropriate programs to reduce teen pregnancy. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) implements the grant program, which totaled $110 million in discretionary funding for Fiscal Year 2010. TPPI consists of two funding tiers that provide grants to local public and private entities. Tier 1 totals $75 million and provides funding for the replication of evidence-based programs proven to prevent unintended teen pregnancy and address underlying behavioral risk factors. Tier 2 totals $25 million and provides funding to develop and test additional models and innovative strategies. A portion of the Tier 2 funds, $15.2 million, was allocated for research and demonstration grants to test innovative approaches, while the remaining funding, $9.8 million, was allocated for grants to support communitywide initiatives. TPPI also dedicates $4.5 million in funding to conduct evaluations of individual programs.
 
TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs
The TPPI Tier 1 grant program supports the replication of evidence-based programs proven effective through rigorous evaluation to prevent unintended teen pregnancy, underlying behavioral risk factors, or other associated risk factors.
  • Local organizations in West Virginia received $1,764,347 in TPPI Tier 1 funding for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • There are two TPPI Tier 1 grantees in West Virginia: Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, Inc.  and Mission West Virginia, Inc.
 
Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, $850,000 (20102014)                                 
The Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, Inc. is a private, non-profit child welfare organization.  It provides comprehensive child welfare, behavioral health, social casework, and advocacy services to more than 9,700 children each year throughout West Virginia. The Society’s mission is “to promote the well being of children” through “helping children find lifetime families, protecting and nurturing children, and helping preserve and strengthen their families.”[22]
 
With its TPPI funding, the Society implements the “Teen Outreach and Pregnancy Prevention Services” program.  The program targets middle school and high school students in grades six through 10 living in three West Virginia counties: Charleston, Martinsburg, and Parkersburg. The overall goal of the program is to reduce the teen pregnancy rate in these target areas.  The program plans to reach approximately 120 students annually.
 
The “Teen Outreach and Pregnancy Prevention Services” program implements the Children’s Aid Society – Carrera Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program (CAS – Carrera) to youth participants. CAS – Carrera is an evidence-based positive youth development program designed for students in grades six through 12. The program consists of seven integrated components that can be delivered  in an after-school or in-school setting over the course of a year. These units include Education, Job Club, Family Life and Sexuality Education, Mental Health, Medical and Dental Services, Self Expression, and Lifetime Individual Sports.[23] The program uses a positive youth development approach to increase developmental competency and identity formation among participants in order to encourage youth to avoid early parenthood and risky sexual behavior. CAS – Carrera runs six days a week throughout the academic year and also includes a summer program component.[24] An evaluation of the program published in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health found that at a three-year follow-up female participants were significantly less likely to report a pregnancy or report being sexually active than participants in the control group.[25]
 
Mission West Virginia, Inc., $914,347 (20102014)                                                  
Mission West Virginia, Inc. is a non-profit organization that focuses on community asset building and partnership development in order to better serve disadvantaged and disenfranchised communities. Its mission is to “[collaborate] with public and private entities, particularly faith communities, equipping them to utilize existing resources to form new partnerships, encouraging innovative social change, and building stronger communities in West Virginia.”[26] The organization operates programs to support youth and families, including programs that teach character development, teen pregnancy prevention and healthy relationships, technology education, workforce development, and asset development, among others.[27]
 
Mission West Virginia previously received federal abstinence-only-until-marriage funding through the now-defunct Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) grant program. The organization was awarded a $600,000 CBAE grant for Fiscal Years 2007–2012 and received $1,770,994 in funding before the program was eliminated in 2010. With its CBAE funds Mission West Virginia formed “T.H.I.N.K.” (Teaching Health Instead of Nagging Kids), a “multi-disciplinary coalition” of public, private, and faith-based entities, youth, and community stakeholders. The coalition was created as a response to “the large number of single-parent families and the rising number of families with teen parents” in the state.[28] Mission West Virginia partnered with three of the state’s Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantees to lead the coalition: Community Action of South Eastern West Virginia (CASE), Rainelle Medical Center, and Regeneration, Inc. Regeneration, Inc., is “a Christ-centered ministry that works alongside the local church to help men and women live lives of sexual integrity.”[29]  It “serve[s] those who struggle with lust, pornography, adultery, homosexuality, and other sexual temptations.”[30] With its CBAE funds, the coalition implemented curricula from the popular abstinence-only-until-marriage series, Choosing the Best, to youth ages 12–18.
 
Mission West Virginia’s TPPI program serves to expand upon “T.H.I.N.K.”  The coalition will continue to focus on promoting abstinence, however, educators will place more of an emphasis on contraceptives and other resources for sexually active participants.[31]  With its Tier 1 funds, the coalition will partner with 41 schools to provide programming to youth ages 12–19. The program will serve predominately, low-income Caucasian middle and high school students in 11 rural West Virginia counties: Doddridge, Fayette, Greenbrier, Marion, McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Nicholas, Raleigh, Ritchie, and Summers.  The overall goal of the program is to reduce teen pregnancy and STD infection among teens in the state.  ”T.H.I.N.K.” member organizations will implement Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) to middle school students and Reducing the Risk to high school students. The organization plans to reach approximately 2,500 youth annually.[32]
 
BART is an evidence-based HIV/AIDS-prevention education curriculum designed for African-American youth ages 14–18.  BART teaches students to reduce sexual risk taking by promoting safer sex practices while also teaching that abstinence is the most effective way to prevent HIV and unintended pregnancy. The curriculum combines education with behavioral skills training on assertion, refusal, self-management, problem solving, risk recognition, and correct condom use.[33]  BART includes interactive activities, group discussions, and role-plays developed by teens. It is designed for implementation in community-based settings and with single-sex groups. An evaluation of the program published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology found that it increased participant knowledge of HIV and AIDS and increased participants’ ability to manage the pressure to engage in unprotected sex as well as to provide information to their peers regarding safe sexual practices.  The program was also found to delay the initiation of sexual intercourse; reduce the frequency of sex and the incidence of unprotected sex; and reduce the incidence of unprotected anal sex.  Among male participants, the program was found to increase condom use [34]
 
Reducing the Risk: Building Skills to Prevent Pregnancy, STD and HIV is an evidence-based, pregnancy-, STD-, and HIV-prevention curriculum designed for classroom use with students in the ninth and tenth grades. It is appropriate for use with multi-ethnic populations.[35]  Reducing the Risk aims to reduce high-risk behaviors among participants and emphasizes strategies for abstaining from sex or practicing safer sex. The 16-lesson curriculum addresses both abstinence and contraception use and includes experiential activities that teach students to develop refusal, negotiation, and communication skills. An evaluation of the program published in Family Planning Perspectives found that it increased parent-child communication, especially among Latino youth, delayed the initiation of sexual intercourse, and reduced incidence of unprotected sex among lower-risk youth who participated in the program.[36]
 
TPPI Tier 2: Innovative Approaches
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program supports research and demonstration programs in order to develop, replicate, refine, and test additional models and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy.  
  • There are no TPPI Tier 2 Innovative Approaches grantees in West Virginia.
 
TPPI Tier 2: Communitywide Initiatives
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program also supports communitywide initiatives to reduce rates of teenage pregnancy and births in communities with the highest rates. The program awards grants to national organizations as well as state- and community-based organizations. Funded national partners provide training and technical assistance to local grantees. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) implement the grant program in partnership with OAH.
  • There are no TPPI Tier 2 Communitywide Initiatives grantees in West Virginia.
 
 
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program
The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) totals $75 million per year for Fiscal Years 2010–2014 and is the first-ever dedicated funding stream for more comprehensive approaches to sexuality education. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF) implements the grant. PREP includes a $55 million state-grant program, $10 million to fund local entities through the Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS) Program, $3.5 million for Indian tribes and tribal organizations, and $6.5 million for evaluation, training, and technical assistance. Details on the state-grant program and PREIS are included below. At the time of publication, the funding for tribes and tribal organizations had not yet been awarded.
 
PREP State-Grant Program
The PREP state-grant program supports evidence-based programs that provide young people with medically accurate and age-appropriate information for the prevention of unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The grant program totals $55 million per year and allocates funding to individual states. The grant does not require states to provide matching funds. Funded programs must discuss abstinence and contraception, and place substantial emphasis on both. Programs must also address at least three of the following adulthood preparation topics: healthy relationships, positive adolescent development, financial literacy, parent-child communication skills, education and employment skills, and healthy life skills.
  • The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources received $276,094 in federal PREP funds for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • The department provides sub-grants to six local public and private entities: All-Aid International, Inc.; Children’s Home Society of West Virginia; Kanawha Institute for Social Research and Action, Inc.; Mission West Virginia, Inc.; MountainHeart Community Services, Inc.; and Wellness Council of West Virginia.
 
All-Aid International, Inc., $31,185 (2010)
All-Aid International, Inc. is a non-profit, humanitarian organization located in Charleston, West Virginia which aims to “serve as a vehicle to uplift the rich heritage of African people.”[37] Toward this end, it sponsors education initiatives to promote international understanding, community events to celebrate cultural diversity, and programs to support the economic empowerment and improve the quality of life of global communities. The organization focuses its programming on health, education and economic development.[38]  With its PREP funds, the organization operates the program, “Sister Act,” which serves African-American females ages 10–19 and teen mothers up to age 21 residing in Kanawha County. The program implements SiHLE to participants and addresses the following three adulthood preparation topics: healthy relationships, adolescent development and healthy life skills.[39]
 
SiHLE (Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering) is an evidence-based HIV- and STD-prevention education program designed for African-American females ages 14–18 who are sexually active and at high risk for HIV. It is a peer-led, social skills training intervention based on social cognitive theory and the theory of gender and power.[40] The program consists of four, four-hour sessions that are administered on consecutive Saturdays in a community-based setting. Sessions are led by an African-American female adult and two peer-facilitators, ages 18–21. The sessions are designed to reinforce ethnic and gender pride and address HIV-prevention strategies, the transmission of STDs, communication and negotiation skills, condom-use skills, self-efficacy, healthy relationships, and personal empowerment. The program incorporates group discussion, lectures, games, and role-playing. Participants also complete homework assignments that provide opportunity for reflection and skills practice. An evaluation of the program published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that at a six-month follow-up, program participants were significantly less likely to report being pregnant and significantly more likely to report having used condoms consistently in the previous six months than participants in the control group. In addition, at a twelve-month follow-up participants were significantly more likely to report consistent condom use in the previous 30 days and having used a condom during last sexual intercourse than participants in the control group.[41]
 
Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, $30,000 (2010)
The Children’s Home Society of West Virginia provides support services to youth, including programming to homeless youth, youth in the juvenile court system, and youth living in foster care, among other groups. The organization is also a TPPI Tier 1 grantee and received $850,000 in teenage pregnancy prevention funds for Fiscal Years 2010–2014. (Please see the TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs section above for more information.) With its PREP sub-grant the Children’s Home Society provides programming to runaway and homeless youth ages 15–19 in Wood County. The program uses Making Proud Choices! and the Ansell-Casey Life Skills Assessment (Casey Life Skills).[42]
           
Making Proud Choices! is an evidence-based STD-, HIV-, and pregnancy-prevention curriculum designed for use with African-American, Latino, and white adolescents ages 11–13. The curriculum aims to help youth understand the poor reasoning and decision making that can lead to STD/HIV infection and/or unintended pregnancy, as well as to increase their confidence, negotiation skills, and self-efficacy in using condoms. The program consists of eight, one-hour sessions and can be implemented in school- or community-based settings. Making Proud Choices! includes interactive and skill-building activities that are designed to “increase comfort with practicing condom use, address concerns about negative effects of practicing safer sex, and build skills in condom use and negotiation.”[43]  An evaluation of the program published in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that program participants reported more consistent condom use and less unprotected sex as well as a higher frequency of condom use than those in the control group.[44]
           
Casey Life Skills is a “suite of comprehensive online assessments, learning plans, and learning resources” that can be utilized to assist young people in gaining the life skills they need to prepare for adulthood.[45] It offers training in the following life skill areas: career planning, communication, daily living, home life, housing and money management, self-care, relationships, work life, and work and study skills.  It also offers assessment supplements that address the needs of specific youth, such as supplements that discuss pregnancy and parenting, caring for infants and young children, homelessness, values, and issues that impact Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The program was originally designed to support youth transitioning out of foster care but is appropriate for use with all youth, regardless of their living situation, and is intended to be free of gender, ethnic, or cultural bias.[46] The Children’s Home Society will use Casey Life Skills to teach adulthood preparation subjects.
 
Kanawha Institute for Social Research and Action, Inc., $40,000 (2010)
Established in 1993 by the Ferguson Memorial Baptist Church, the Kanawha Institute for Social Research and Action, Inc. (KISRA) provides education, employment, economic empowerment, and behavioral health services to West Virginians in Cabell, Fayette, Kanawha, Mercer, Putnam, and Raleigh counties.[47] The organization’s PREP-funded program, “KPREP,” serves youth ages 15–21 in Kanawha County and particularly targets African-American youth, teen mothers, youth in the juvenile justice system, students of West Virginia State University, and youth involved in KISRA’s student achievement and responsible fatherhood programs. “KPREP” implements Reducing the Risk, an evidence-based sexuality education curriculum, to program participants. (Please see the TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs section above for a description of Reducing the Risk.) The program includes a mentoring component and addresses the following three adulthood preparation topics: financial literacy, educational and career success, and healthy life skills.[48]
 
Mission West Virginia, Inc. $40,000 (2010)
Mission West Virginia is a non-profit organization that partners with local public and private entities to provide support services to underserved communities in West Virginia. The organization is a former CBAE grantee and current TPPI Tier 1 grantee. (Please see the TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs section above for more information.) With its PREP funds, Mission West Virginia provides programming to youth in, and aging out of, foster care. The organization operates its personal responsibility education program through T.H.I.N.K. (Teaching Health Instead of Nagging Kids), a local coalition initiative to reduce teen pregnancy and out-of-wedlock births.
           
The PREP-funded program serves young people ages 11–19 living in two groups homes in Wayne County: Golden Girl Group Home, which provides housing to young women and girls, and Stepping Stones, which serves adolescent males. It aims to reach a total of 45 participants with educational programming and engage an additional 50 youth through community-centered events. The program uses Reducing the Risk to teach sexuality education, healthy relationships, and healthy life skills, and uses Casey Life Skills to teach education and employment skills. (Please see the TPPI Tier 1: Evidence Based Programs section above for more information on Reducing the Risk, and the description of the Children’s Home Society PREP sub-grant for information on Casey Life Skills.)
 
MountainHeart Community Services, Inc., $40,000 (2010)
MountainHeart Community Services, Inc. works to “reduce the incidence of and lessen the impact of poverty among West Virginia residents.”[49] Founded in 1965, the non-profit organization provides programs and support services to 29 counties in West Virginia. These services include child-care resources, early childhood education programs, housing construction and weatherization services, income tax preparation services, in-home care, computer training and information technology, career training, and professional development services, among other services. MountainHeart operates 12 offices throughout the northeastern and southeastern regions of the states.[50]
           
The organization partners with the local health department, school district, and community service agencies in Wyoming County to operate its personal responsibility education program, “Think It Over.” The program serves young people ages 10–19 and pregnant and parenting women up to age 21. Sexuality education is provided to high school and middle school students using Making Proud Choices!  (Please see the description of the Community Home Society’s PREP-funded program above for more information on Making Proud Choices! ) The program also teaches healthy relationships, financial literacy, and parent-child communication instruction through community service programs and events.[51]
 
Wellness Council of West Virginia, $40,000 and $43,466 (2010)
The Wellness Council of West Virginia serves as the state’s “primary resource for worksite wellness” and offers various programs and services to assist organizations in improving employee health, well-being, and productivity.[52] The organization conducts workplace wellness trainings and primarily provides program resources for tobacco cessation.
           
The Wellness Council implements two separate PREP-funded programs that target at-risk adolescents and young adults ages 12–20. The first program, “Better Choices for Pregnancy Prevention,” ($40,000) addresses “the importance of teen abstinence” while also providing information on teen pregnancy prevention, safe sex, and STDs in order to “reduce and eliminate the risky behaviors that…negatively impact adolescent lives.”[53] The program specifically targets young women, in Kanawha, Logan, and Putnam counties. Programming is provided in community-based settings using Reducing the Risk. (Please see the TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs section above for more information on Reducing the Risk.) In addition, through “Better Choices for Pregnancy Prevention,” the Wellness Council collaborates with girls’ sports teams to present interactive displays that provide informational resources to adolescents and their parents about self-esteem, abstinence, safe sex and STDs, and also provides one-on-one interventions to middle school and high schools girls.[54]
           
With its second PREP sub-grant ($43,466), the organization implements the “You’re Worth It! Learn What You Need to Know about Reducing Your Risk” project to young people in Wetzel County. The program aims to reduce the number of pregnancies and STD rates, including HIV/AIDS, among young people in the county by increasing their knowledge of abstinence and contraception use and helping them to build decision-making skills. The Wellness Council collaborates with community-based organizations to implement Reducing the Risk to older adolescents and conducts outreach events that target middle school students and pregnant and parenting teens. The program specifically targets youth in foster care.[55]
           
Both programs offer adulthood preparation instruction that addresses healthy relationships, education and employment skills, and healthy life skills. Participants receive community referrals and resources related to General Educational Development (GED) preparation and higher education, employment training, tobacco and substance abuse, stress management, and financial literacy.[56]
 
Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS)
The PREIS Program supports research and demonstration programs to develop, replicate, refine, and test innovative models for preventing unintended teen pregnancy. ACF implements the grant program in collaboration with OAH and provides a total of $10 million in funding directly to local public and private entities.
  • There are no PREIS grantees in West Virginia.
 
 
 
Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program
The Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program (Title V Abstinence-Only Program) allocates $50 million per year for Fiscal Years 2010–2014. ACF implements the grant. The Title V Abstinence-Only Program requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups. All programs funded by the Title V Abstinence-Only Program must promote abstinence from sexual activity as their exclusive purpose and may provide mentoring, counseling, and adult supervision toward this end. Programs must be medically accurate and age-appropriate and must ensure abstinence is an expected outcome.
  • The West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources received $313,767 in federal Title V abstinence-only funding for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • In West Virginia, sub-grantees will contribute to the match primarily through in-kind services.
 
The West Virginia Title V abstinence-only program will be implemented by Department of Health and Human Resources, Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health through the Adolescent Health Initiative. The grant will provide funding to local public and private entities to serve youth ages 12–18 in school- and community-based settings, and provide additional program resources to parents, young adults, and community members. At the time of publication, sub-grantees had not yet been determined. All funding recipients will be required to implement Promoting Health Among Teens! (Abstinence-Only Intervention.)[57]
           
Promoting Health Among Teens! (Abstinence-Only Intervention) is an evidence-based curriculum developed to increase knowledge and awareness about STDs, including HIV, increase an understanding of how abstinence can prevent pregnancy and HIV/STDs, and build refusal and negotiation skills for practicing abstinence. Promoting Health Among Teens! aims for participants to abstain from vaginal, oral and anal intercourse until a time later in life when they are ready to handle the potential consequences of having sex and neither discourages nor encourages condom use.[58] Although originally intended for use with urban, African-American youth in small groups, the intervention can be adapted for use with larger groups and those in rural settings.[59]  The curriculum is designed as eight, one-hour modules that include group discussions, videos, role-playing, skill-building activities, games, and other experiential exercises. It is appropriate for use in both school- and community-based settings. An evaluation of the program published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that at a 24-month follow-up,  participants who were sexually inexperienced at the time of the program were significantly less likely to have initiated sex than participants in the control group.[60]
 
 
 
West Virginia TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only Funding in FY 2010
Grantee
Award
Fiscal Years
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI)
TPPI Tier 1: Replication of Evidence-Based Programs
Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, Inc.
$850,000
2010−2014
Mission West Virginia, Inc.
$914,347
2010−2014
TOTAL
$1,764,347
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP)
PREP State-Grant Program
West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources
(federal grant)
$276,094
2010
Sub-grantees:
 
 
All-Aid International, Inc.
$31,185
 
Children’s Home Society of West Virginia
$30,000
 
Kanawha Institute for Social Research and Action, Inc.
$40,000
 
Mission West Virginia, Inc.
$40,000
 
MountainHeart Community Services, Inc.
$40,000
 
Wellness Council of West Virginia
$40,000
 
Wellness Council of West Virginia
$43,466
 
TOTAL
$276,094
 
Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (Title V Abstinence-Only)
West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources
(federal grant)
$313,767
2010
TOTAL
$313,767
 
 
GRAND TOTAL
$2,354,208
2010
 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sexuality Education
 
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in West Virginia public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in West Virginia public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles.  Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information.  Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
 
Points of Contact
 
Adolescent Health Contact[61]
Patty McGrew
Director, Adolescent Health Initiative
Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health
West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources
350 Capitol Street, Room 427
Charleston, WV 25301
Phone: (304) 558-4934
 
PREP State-Grant Coordinator
Tisha Reed
Director, Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health
West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources
350 Capitol Street, Room 427
Charleston, WV 25301
Phone: (304) 558-7186
 
Title V Abstinence-Only State-Grant Coordinator
Patty McGrew
Director, Adolescent Health Initiative
Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health
West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources
350 Capitol Street, Room 427
Charleston, WV 25301
Phone: (304) 558-4934
 
 
 
Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
ACLU of West Virginia
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 345-9246
 
Rainbow Pride of West Virginia
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 345-9938
 
Charleston AIDS Network
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 345-4673
 
WV FREE
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 342-9188
 
Planned Parenthood Health Systems
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 989-3820
 
 
 
 
Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
West Virginia Family Foundation
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 965-6700
 
West Virginians for Life
Morgantown, WV
Phone: (304) 594-9845
 
 
 
Media Outlets
 
Newspapers inWest Virginia[62]
Charleston Daily Mail
Charleston, WV 25301
Phone: (304) 348-4830
 
Charleston Gazette
Charleston, WV
Phone: (304) 348-5100
 
Dominion Post
Morgantown, WV
Phone: (304) 291-9425
 
Herald-Dispatch
Huntington, WV
Phone: (304) 526-2773
 
News and Sentinel
Parkersburg, WV
Phone: (304) 485-1891
Wheeling News-Register
Wheeling, WV
Phone: (304) 233-0100
 
Political Blogs in West Virginia
Progressive Democrats of West Virginia
 
West Virginia Blue
 
 
 

[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th.  The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2010 began on October 1, 2009 and ended on September 30, 2010.
[3]W. Va. Board of Education Policy 2422.4 § 126-50A-2, <http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p2422.4.html>. 
[4]W. Va. Board of Education Policy 2422.4 § 126-50A-4.3, <http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p2422.4.html>   
[5]W. Va. Board of Education Policy 2422.4 § 126-50A–3.3.1, <http://wvde.state.wv.us/policies/p2422.4.html>.  . 
[7]Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[8]“Births: Final Data for 2008,” National Vital Statistics Report, vol. 59, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 2010), accessed 29 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr59/nvsr59_01.pdf>, Table 12.
[9]“VitalStats: Birth Data Files by State, Age of Mother in Years, 2008,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), accessed 30 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstats/VitalStats_Births.htm>.
[10]U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[11]Ibid., Table 3.2.
[12]U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity., Table 3.3.
[13]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2010), accessed 28 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2008report/pdf/2008SurveillanceReport.pdf>, Table 19.
[14]Ibid.
[15]Slide 9: “Rates of Diagnoses of HIV Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[16]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, Table 20.
[17]Ibid.
[18]Slide 18: “Rates of Diagnoses of AIDS Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[19]“Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[20]Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[21]Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[22]“Mission,” Children’s Home Society of West Virginia, accessed 15 June 2011, <http://www.childhswv.org/wwa/mission.htm>.
[23]“Our Program,” The Children’s Aid Society – Carrera Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://stopteenpregnancy.childrensaidsociety.org/our-program>.
[24]Ibid.
[25]“Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implementation Report: Children’s Aid Society (CAS) – Carrera,” Programs for Replication – Intervention Implementation Reports, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/oah-initiatives/tpp/programs/cas_carrera.pdf>.
[26]“About Us,” Mission West Virginia, Inc., accessed 15 June 2011, <http://www.missionwv.org/MIssionWV/index.php?cat=1&title=About>.
[27]Mission West Virginia,Inc., Application for Federal Assistance SF-424, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative Tier 1 Program (May 2010), “Organizational Capability,” 2. Information obtained from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health through a Freedom of Information Act request.
[28]Mission West Virginia, Inc., Application for Federal Assistance SF-424, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative Tier 1 Program, 3.
[29]Regeneration, Inc., accessed 1 July 2011, <http://regenerationministries.org/>.
[30]Ibid.
[31]Veronica Nett, “Federal grant takes new approach to teen pregnancy prevention,” The Charleston Gazette, 20 October 2010, accessed 15 June 2011, <http://wvgazette.com/News/201010201259>.
[32]Mission West Virginia, Inc., Application for Federal Assistance SF-424, Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative Tier 1 Program, 1.
[33]“Becoming A Responsible Teen,” Evidence-Based Programs, Resource Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (ReCAPP), ETR Associates, accessed 5 May 2010, <http://www.etr.org/recapp/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.ebpDetail&PageID=2&PageTypeID=2>.
[34]Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008), accessed 30 March 2010, <http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/sciencesuccess.pdf>, 76–78.
[35]Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008), accessed 30 March 2010, <http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/sciencesuccess.pdf>, 22.
[36]Ibid., 23–24.
[37]“About All-Aid International,” Heritage Towers Museum, accessed 16 August 2011, <http://heritagetowersmuseum.org/about-all-aid-international.html>.
[38]Ibid.
[39]“West Virginia Teen Pregnancy Prevention PREP Project,” Personal Responsibility Education Program State Plan Abstract (January 2011), West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 14. Information provided by Tisha Reed, Director of the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 23 February 2011.
[40]“Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, Empowering (SiHLE),” Evidence-Based Programs, Resource Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (ReCAPP), ETR Associates, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.etr.org/recapp/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.ebpDetail&PageID=567&PageTypeID=2>.
[41]Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008), accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/sciencesuccess.pdf>, 98–101; see also “Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implementation Report: Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering (SiHLE),” Programs for Replication – Intervention Implementation Reports, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/oah-initiatives/tpp/programs/sihle.pdf>.
[42]“West Virginia Teen Pregnancy Prevention PREP Project,” Personal Responsibility Education Program State Plan Abstract (January 2011), West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 18. Information provided by Tisha Reed, Director of the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 23 February 2011.
[43]“Making Proud Choices!” Evidence-Based Programs, Resource Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (ReCAPP), ETR Associates, accessed 15 April 2010, <http://www.etr.org/recapp/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.ebpDetail&PageID=128>.
[44]Ibid.
[45]“The Ansell-Casey Life Skills Assessment,” Casey Life Skills, accessed 16 August 2011, <http://www.caseylifeskills.org/pages/assess/whatis.htm>.
[46]Ibid.
[47]Kanawha Institute for Social Research and Action, Inc., accessed 16 August 2011, <http://www.kisra.org/>.
[48]“West Virginia Teen Pregnancy Prevention PREP Project,” Personal Responsibility Education Program State Plan Abstract (January 2011), West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 8 and 21, Information provided by Tisha Reed, Director of the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 23 February 2011.
[49]“About Us,” MountainHeart Community Services, Inc., accessed 19 August 2011, <http://mountainheartwv.org/agency/documents/media/MountainHeart%20Press%20Packet.pdf>.
[50]Ibid.
[51]“West Virginia Teen Pregnancy Prevention PREP Project,” Personal Responsibility Education Program State Plan Abstract (January 2011), West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 15–17. Information provided by Tisha Reed, Director of the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 23 February 2011.
[52]“Wellness Council,” West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Tobacco Prevention, accessed 19 August 2011, <http://www.wvdtp.org/Partners/WellnessCouncil/tabid/405/Default.aspx>.
[53]“West Virginia Teen Pregnancy Prevention PREP Project,” Personal Responsibility Education Program State Plan Abstract (January 2011), West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 26. Information provided by Tisha Reed, Director of the Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 23 February 2011.
[54]Ibid.
[55]Ibid, 27
[56]Ibid, 31.
[57]Information provided by Patty McGrew, Director of the Adolescent Health Initiative for the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, 28 February 2011.
[58]Ibid.
[59]“Promoting Health Among Teens! Abstinence-Only,” Evidence-Based Programs, Resource Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (ReCAPP), ETR Associates, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.etr.org/recapp/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.ebpDetail&PageID=575&PageTypeID=2>.
[60]“Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implementation Report: Promoting Health Among Teens! Abstinence-Only Intervention,” Programs for Replication – Intervention Implementation Reports, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/oah-initiatives/tpp/programs/promoting_health.pdf>.
[61]The person listed represents the designated personnel in the state responsible for adolescent reproductive health.
[62]This section is a list of major newspapers in the state and is by no means exhaustive of local print outlets.
 
National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education