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New Jersey State Profile Fiscal Year 2010

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Sexuality Education Law and Policy | Recent Legislation | Youth Sexual Health Data | Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative | Personal Responsibility Education Program | Title V Abstinence-Only Program | TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only Funding in FY 2010 | Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education | Points of Contact | Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education | Media Outlets | References

 
New Jersey
 
In Fiscal Year 2010[1], the state of New Jersey received:
  • Personal Responsibility Education Program funds totaling $1,412,929
  • Title V State Abstinence Education Program funds totaling $913,938
 
In Fiscal Year 2010, local entities in New Jersey received:
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative funds totaling $2,446,848
 
 
Sexuality Education Law and Policy
New Jerseylaw mandates at least 150 minutes of health education during each school week in grades one through 12.[2] In addition, high school students must acquire 3 ¾ credits of health education each year.[3] School districts must align their health education curricula with the New Jersey Department of Education’s Core Curriculum Content Standards for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education, which among other instruction requirements state that “all students will learn the physical, emotional, and social aspects of human relationships and sexuality and apply these concepts to support a healthy, active lifestyle.”[4]
 
In addition, to the Core Curriculum Content Standards, the New Jersey Department of Education published the Comprehensive Health Education and Physical Education Curriculum Framework in 1999, which provides a “compendium of sample learning strategies [and activities], background information, and resources” to assist school districts in developing curricula that will “enable all students to meet the standards.”[5] The Curriculum Framework includes detailed suggestions for teaching about HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and teen pregnancy prevention.
 
The Curriculum Framework aligns with the Core Curriculum Content Standards and addressesa wide variety of topics for students in kindergarten through high school, including families, peer pressure, media stereotypes, the reproductive system, pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, abstinence, contraception, gender assumptions, sexual orientation, and marriage. The Framework aims to “provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to establish healthy relationships and practice safe and healthful behaviors,” including instruction on “healthy sexual development as well as the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, HIV infection, and unintended pregnancy.”[6]
 
State law also requires that all sexuality education programs and curricula stress abstinence.[7]  In addition, “[a]ny instruction concerning the use of contraceptives or prophylactics such as condoms shall also include information on their failure rates for preventing pregnancy, HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases in actual use among adolescent populations and shall clearly explain the difference between risk reduction through the use of such devices and risk elimination through abstinence.”[8]
 
New Jerseyallows parents or guardians to remove their children from any part of the health, family life, or sex education classes if it is “in conflict with his conscience, or sincerely held moral or religious beliefs.”[9]  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
 
 
 
Recent Legislation
 
SIECUS is not aware of any recent legislation regarding sexuality education in New Jersey.
 
 
 
Youth Sexual Health Data
SIECUS has compiled the following data to provide an overview of adolescent sexual health in New Jersey. The data collected represents the most current information available.
 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) Data[10]
  • In 2009, 44% of female high school students and 49% of male high school students in New Jersey reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 2% of female high school students and 7% of male high school students in New Jersey reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 9% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in New Jersey reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 34% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students in New Jersey reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 57% of females and 74% of males in New Jersey reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 23% of females and 16% of males in New Jersey reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 14% of females and 25% of males in New Jersey reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 92% of high school students in New Jersey reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • New Jersey’s teen birth rate currently ranks 47th in the United States, with a rate of 24.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 41.5 births per 1,000.[11] In 2008, there were a total of 6,366 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in New Jersey.[12]
 
  • In 2005, New Jersey’s teen pregnancy rate ranked 21st in the United States, with a rate of 68 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[13]  There were a total of 20,020 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in New Jersey.[14]
 
  • In 2005, New Jersey’s teen abortion rate ranked 3rd in the United States, with a rate of 36 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000.  In 2005, there were a total of 5,453 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in New Jersey.[15]
 
HIV and AIDS
  • New Jerseyranks 6th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 1,818 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in New Jersey.[17]
 
  • New Jersey’s HIV infection rate ranks 7th in the United States, with a rate of 20.9 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 19.5 cases per 100,000.[18]
 
  • New Jersey’s HIV infection rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 14th in the United States, with a rate of 9 cases per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 9.1 cases per 100,000.[19]
 
  • New Jerseyranks 7th in number of reported AIDS cases in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 1,527 new AIDS cases reported in New Jersey.[20]
 
  • New Jersey’s AIDS rate ranks 7th in the United States, with a rate of 17.6 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 12.3 cases per 100,000.[21]
 
  • New Jersey’s AIDS rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 4th in the United States with a rate of 3.6 cases per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 1.8 cases per 100,000.[22]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • New Jerseyranks 42nd in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 13.38 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 7,943 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in New Jersey.[23]
 
  • New Jerseyranks 28th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 2.87 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 1,701 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in New Jersey.[24]
 
  • New Jerseyranks 16th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 0.03 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000.[25]
 
 
 
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
The President’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI) funds medically accurate and age-appropriate programs to reduce teen pregnancy. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) implements the grant program, which totaled $110 million in discretionary funding for Fiscal Year 2010. TPPI consists of two funding tiers that provide grants to local public and private entities. Tier 1 totals $75 million and provides funding for the replication of evidence-based programs proven to prevent unintended teen pregnancy and address underlying behavioral risk factors. Tier 2 totals $25 million and provides funding to develop and test additional models and innovative strategies. A portion of the Tier 2 funds, $15.2 million, was allocated for research and demonstration grants to test innovative approaches, while the remaining funding, $9.8 million, was allocated for grants to support communitywide initiatives. TPPI also dedicates $4.5 million in funding to conduct evaluations of individual programs.
 
TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs
The TPPI Tier 1 grant program supports the replication of evidence-based programs proven effective through rigorous evaluation to prevent unintended teen pregnancy, underlying behavioral risk factors, or other associated risk factors.
  • Local organizations in New Jersey received $1,481,326 in TPPI Tier 1 funding for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • There are two TPPI Tier 1 grantees in New Jersey: The Central Jersey Family Health Consortium(formerly the Regional Perinatal Consortium of Monmouth and Ocean County) and South Jersey Healthcare.
 
Central Jersey Family Health Consortium, Inc., $481,326 (2010–2014)
The Central Jersey Family Health Consortium (CJFHC), formerly the Regional Perinatal Consortium of Monmouth and Ocean Counties, is a network of private non-profit organizations composed of perinatal and pediatric providers, hospitals, community-based agencies, consumers, and consumer advocacy groups with an interest in health services for women, children, and families.[26] The organization aims to improve the health of pregnant women and children in Central New Jersey by identifying barriers to health care access, and planning and coordinating preventive, educational, and clinical services.[27]  
 
With its TPPI funding, CJFHC provides programming to suburban and rural, African-American youth under the age of 19 attending Neptune and Asbury Park school districts in Monmouth and Ocean counties. CJFHC implements Teen Outreach Program (TOP), an evidence-based youth development program that engages young people in experiential learning activities in order to “prepare for successful adulthood and avoid problem behaviors.”[28] The program is designed for youth ages 12–17 and focuses on reducing rates of school failure, school suspension, and teen pregnancy. TOP consists of a nine-month curriculum that addresses such topics as relationships, peer pressure, decision making, values clarification, goal-setting, adolescent development, and sexual health.[29] It also includes a 20-hour community service component that engages participants in activities to enhance knowledge and develop skills, including self-efficacy, communication, conflict-management, and self-regulation. TOP can be delivered as an in-school, after-school, or community-based program. An evaluation of the program published in Child Development found that young women, ages 15–19, who participated in TOP were significantly less likely to report a pregnancy during the program than participants in the control group.[30]
 
CJFHC plans for the program to reach approximately 900 youth annually.
 
South JerseyHealthcare, $1,000,000 (2010–2014)
South Jersey Healthcare (SJH) is a charitable, non-profit health care organization made up of a network of hospitals, health care providers, and doctors in Southern New Jersey. SJH It provides the full continuum of primary, acute, and advanced care services.
 
With its TPPI funding, SJH implements the “Cumberland County Partnership for Healthy Teens.” The overall goal of the program is to reduce the teen pregnancy rate in targeted areas of South Jersey.  The program replicates Children’s Aid Society – Carerra Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program (CAS – Carrera), an evidence-based positive youth development program designed for students in grades six through 12. The program consists of seven integrated components that can be delivered  in an after-school or in-school setting over the course of a year. These units include Education, Job Club, Family Life and Sexuality Education, Mental Health, Medical and Dental Services, Self Expression, and Lifetime Individual Sports.[31] The program uses a positive youth development approach to increase developmental competency and identity formation among participants in order to encourage youth to avoid early parenthood and risky sexual behavior. CAS – Carrera runs six days a week throughout the academic year and also includes a summer program component.[32] An evaluation of the program published in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health found that at a three-year follow-up female participants were significantly less likely to report a pregnancy or report being sexually active than participants in the control group.[33]
 
“Cumberland County Partnership for Healthy Teens” serves primarily Latino youth attending the sixth grade in Bridgeton and Vineland school districts, selected for their high incidence of teen pregnancy (Cumberland County has the highest rate of teen pregnancy in  New Jersey).[34] SJH partners with local schools and community agencies, including Community Health Care, Inc., and the Boys & Girls Club and YMCA of Vineland, to deliver the program to students six days a week.[35] SJH plans for the program to serve the same 120 students over the five-year period of the grant. 
 
TPPI Tier 2: Innovative Approaches
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program supports research and demonstration programs in order to develop, replicate, refine, and test additional models and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy.
  • There is one TPPI Tier 2 Innovative Approaches grantee in New Jersey, Princeton Center for Leadership Training, which received $965,522 for Fiscal Year 2010.
 
PrincetonCenterfor Leadership Training, $965,522 (2010–2014)
The Princeton Center for Leadership Training is a community-based organization that develops, disseminates, and promotes “peer leadership, advisory, and other evidence-based K–12 solutions that enable and inspire educators to more fully engage students in learning, better connect students to their schools, motivate and equip students to make decisions responsibly, and accelerate academic achievement.”[36] The organization uses its Tier 2 grant to implement and test the Teen Prevention Education Project (Teen PEP) in five rural and low-income communities in five North Carolina counties: Columbus, Greene, Forsyth, Lenoir, and Rockingham.  The program will serve approximately 1,080 young people in 16 high schools each year. 
 
Teen PEP “is a comprehensive, sexual health program that utilizes peer-to-peer education to increase students’ knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors associated with healthy decisionmaking.”[37] It was created by the Princeton Center for Leadership Training, HiTOPS (Health Interested Teens’ Own Program on Sexuality), Inc., and the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services.  (Please see the Comprehensive Sex Education in Public Schools section below for more information.)
 
During the first year of the program, stakeholders throughout the community and program advisors are identified and trained to implement Teen PEP. In the following year, program advisors identify students to function as peer educators and train them utilizing the Teen PEP curriculum. The peer educators will conduct outreach workshops with younger youth that address postponing sexual activity; preventing unintended pregnancy and STDs, including HIV; puberty; combating homophobia; and preventing date rape and partner violence during and after regular school hours. They will also conduct workshops with parents, school educators, and other groups.[38]
 
TPPI Tier 2: Communitywide Initiatives
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program also supports communitywide initiatives to reduce rates of teenage pregnancy and births in communities with the highest rates. The program awards grants to national organizations as well as state- and community-based organizations. Funded national partners provide training and technical assistance to local grantees. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) implement the grant program in partnership with OAH.
  • There are no TPPI Tier 2 Communitywide Initiatives grantees in New Jersey.
 
 
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program
The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) totals $75 million per year for Fiscal Years 2010–2014 and is the first-ever dedicated funding stream for more comprehensive approaches to sexuality education. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF) implements the grant. PREP includes a $55 million state-grant program, $10 million to fund local entities through the Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS) Program, $3.5 million for Indian tribes and tribal organizations, and $6.5 million for evaluation, training, and technical assistance. Details on the state-grant program and PREIS are included below. At the time of publication, the funding for tribes and tribal organizations had not yet been awarded.
 
PREP State-Grant Program
The PREP state-grant program supports evidence-based programs that provide young people with medically accurate and age-appropriate information for the prevention of unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The grant program totals $55 million per year and allocates funding to individual states. The grant does not require states to provide matching funds. Funded programs must discuss abstinence and contraception, and place substantial emphasis on both. Programs must also address at least three of the following adulthood preparation subjects: healthy relationships, positive adolescent development, financial literacy, parent-child communication skills, education and employment skills, and healthy life skills.
  • The New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services received $1,412,929 in federal PREP funds for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • The department has issued an application announcement for available funds under the state’s PREP grant program. At the time of publication, sub-grantees had not yet been determined.
 
The New Jersey PREP state-grant will support up to six projects that will provide evidence-based programming to New Jersey municipalities with some of the highest teen birth rates in the state. Local public and private entities are eligible to apply for the funds. The state-grant program requires funded programs to serve youth ages 10–19; and 50 percent of the youth served through each program must reside in one of the state’s 30 municipalities with the highest teen birth rates. In addition, the department will fund one local agency in each of the north, central, and south regions of the state. Sub-grantees may use any of the 28 evidence-based programs approved by the Office of Adolescent Health for replication.[39] (Please see the OAH Intervention Implementation Reportsfor more information about these programs.)
 
Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS)
The PREIS Program supports research and demonstration programs to develop, replicate, refine, and test innovative models for preventing unintended teen pregnancy. ACF implements the grant program in collaboration with OAH and provides a total of $10 million in funding directly to local public and private entities.
  • There are no PREIS grantees in New Jersey.
 
 
 
Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program
The Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program (Title V Abstinence-Only Program) allocates $50 million per year to states for Fiscal Years 2010–2014. ACF implements the grant program. The Title V Abstinence-Only Program requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups. All programs funded by the Title V Abstinence-Only Program must promote abstinence from sexual activity as their exclusive purpose and may provide mentoring, counseling, and adult supervision toward this end. Programs must be medically accurate and age-appropriate and must ensure abstinence is an expected outcome.
  • The New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services received $913,938 in federal Title V abstinence-only funding for Fiscal Year 2010.
  • The department provided sub-grants to four local public and private entities.
  • In New Jersey, sub-grantees contributed to the match.
 
The New Jersey Title V Abstinence-Only Program supports programs that provide abstinence education in addition to including one or more of the following program components: youth development, mentoring, counseling, or other adult-supervised activities. Programs must also address one or more of the following topics: healthy relationships, healthy behaviors, or life skills. Funded organizations provide programming to youth ages 10–14. The grant requires that 50 percent of youth served by each organization reside in one of the state’s 30 municipalities with the highest teen birth rates. In addition, at least one sub-grantee is located in each of the north, central, and south regions of the state.[40]
 
New Jersey’s Title V Abstinence-Only sub-grantees include: Institute for Relationship Intelligence, Inc.; Lifeguard, Inc.; Mount Olives Church of God, Inc.; and St. Peter’s Healthcare System. The majority of funded programs implement the YES You Can! curricula series with the exception of Relationship Intelligence, which uses its own curriculum.[41]
 
The YES You Can! curricula series was developed by Saint Michael’s Medical Center and is a product of “Project YES You Can!,” an abstinence-only-until-marriage program that previously received federal funding from the now-defunct Community-Based Abstinence Education funding stream. The project is intended to help youth “buck the tide of an over-sexualized social climate” by offering information on “the benefits of waiting,” “the impact sexual decisions have on the future,” and “the differences between males and females” among other topics[42] The Yes You Can! series is comprised of three curricula: YES You Can!…Experience True Freedom! (seventh and eighth grades); YES You Can!…Make Smart Choices! (ninth and 10th grades); and YES You Can!…Build Healthy Relationships! (11th and 12th grades).[43]
 
 
 
New Jersey TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only funding in FY 2010
Grantee
Award
Fiscal Years
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI)
TPPI Tier 1: Replication of Evidence-Based Programs
The Central Jersey Family Health Consortium
(formerly the Regional Perinatal Consortium of
Monmouth and Ocean County)
$481,326
2010–2014
South JerseyHealthcare
$1,000,000
2010–2014
TOTAL
$1,481,326
 
TPPI Tier 2: Innovative Approaches
Princeton Center for Leadership Training
$965,522
2010–2014
TOTAL
$965,522
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP)
PREP State-Grant Program
New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services
(federal grant)
$1,412,929
2010
TOTAL
$1,412,929
 
Title V Abstinence Education Grant Program (Title V Abstinence-Only)
New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services
(federal grant)
  $913,938
2010
Sub-grantees
 
 
Institute for Relationship Intelligence, Inc.
 
2010
Lifeguard, Inc.
 
2010
Mount Olives Church of God, Inc.
 
2010
St. Peter’s Healthcare System
 
2010
TOTAL
$913,938
 
     
GRAND TOTAL
$4,773,715
2010
 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sexuality Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in New Jersey public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[44]
 
Updated State Health Education Standards
The 2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards establish “21st-century” knowledge, skills, concepts, “global perspectives,” and technology expectations for students in preschool through grade 12.[45] These standards are revised and updated from the previous standards that were adopted in 2004. There are two “critical education priorities” encompassed in the revised standards: 1) the standards “align with the knowledge and skills needed by all students for post-secondary opportunities,” including higher education and vocational training opportunities, and 2) the standards “reflect a framework for teaching and learning that [corresponds] to the needs of 21st-century digital learners” that require “new literacies” in a global, technology innovation economy.  Thus, the standards call on educators and students to think critically, creatively, and to learn collectively while “working across and beyond traditional education disciplines.”[46]
 
The Content Standards address nine education content areas, including Comprehensive Health and Physical Education, which consist of six standards, 2.1–2.6.  Standard 2.4, “Human Relationships and Sexuality,” addresses such concepts as families, relationships, gender, puberty, human sexuality, reproduction, pregnancy, and parenting. Concepts related to STD and HIV/AIDS prevention, risk behaviors, and risk-reduction are addressed under multiple standards, including Standards 2.1, 2.3, and 2.4.[47]
 
The standards provide “cumulative progress indicators” (CPIs) that determine the specific knowledge and skills students should gain by the completion of certain grade levels (preschool, grade two, four, six, eight, and 12). CPIs serve as education benchmarks.  For example, one CPI related to sexuality education suggests that by the fourth grade students should be able to “[d]ifferentiate the physical, social, and emotional changes occurring at puberty and explain why puberty begins and ends at different ages.”[48]
 
A number of CPIs that fall under Standard 2.4, “Human Relationships and Sexuality,” address responsible sexual behavior including abstinence and contraception.  Indicators for younger students about abstinence are primarily knowledge–based while the indicators for higher grades are more skills-based standards.  For example, a CPI for sixth graders states that students should be able to “summarize strategies to remain abstinent and resist pressures to become sexually active,”whereas eighth graders should be able to “determine the benefits of sexual abstinence and develop strategies to resist pressures to become sexually active, [49] and 12th grade students should be able to “evaluate information that supports abstinence from sexual activity using reliable research data.”[50]
 
Students are also expected to know about contraception. One CPI states that students in eighth grade should be able to “compare and contrast methods of contraception used by adolescents and factors that may influence their use;” while by the completion of 12th grade students should be able to “analyze factors that influence the choice, use, and effectiveness of contraception, including risk-reduction and risk-elimination strategies.”[51]
 
To align with the development of 21st-century education standards, a new CPI included under Standard 2.4 addresses the use of technology within relationships. Specifically the standards state that 12th grade students should understand how “technology impacts the capacity of individuals to develop and maintain interpersonal relationships.”[52] The aligning CPI suggests that students should be able to “analyze how various technologies impact the developments and maintenance of local and global interpersonal relationships.”[53]
 
The 2009 revised standard also expand upon the previous learning expectations related to sexual identity and anti-bullying in regards to sexual orientation. The standards suggest that students in eighth and 12th grade should understand that discussions of sexuality are significant and sensitive and that such discussions require “a safe, supportive environment where sensitivity and respect is shown to all.”[54] Specifically, the CPI for eighth grade states that students should be able to “discuss topics regarding gender identity, sexual orientation, and cultural stereotyping,” and that by the completion of 12th grade students should be able to “compare and contrast attitudes and beliefs about gender identity, sexual orientation, and gender equity across cultures.”[55]
 
In another update, students are also expected to learn more about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and newly available vaccines. For example, one CPI states that students in sixth grade should be able to “determine behaviors that place one at risk for HIV/AIDS, STIs, HPV, or unintended pregnancy,” while another suggests that eighth grade students should be able to “explain the importance of practicing routine healthcare procedures such as breast self-examination, testicular examinations, and [the] HPV vaccine.”[56]
 
Both previous and current standards include the learning expectation that high school students will be able to “determine the impact of physical, social, emotional, cultural, religious, ethical, and legal issues on elective pregnancy termination.”[57] For the 2009 revised standards, a newly added CPI states that 12th grade students should be able to “compare the legal rights and responsibilities of adolescents with those of adults regarding pregnancy, abortion, and parenting.”[58]
 
Comprehensive Sex Education Programs in Public Schools
New JerseyTeen Prevention Education Program (Teen PEP)
The New Jersey Teen Prevention Education Program (Teen PEP) is a “sexual health promotion and peer education initiative” that trains high school students to serve as peer health educators, providing them with the knowledge and tools to become “effective and capable sexual health advocates and role models.”[59] The program, which began officially in 1999, is a collaboration of the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, the Princeton Center for Leadership Training, and HiTOPS (Health Interested Teens’ Own Program on Sexuality), Inc. Through the initiative, the collaborating partners work with school districts across the state to implement the Teen PEP sexual health course in participating high schools. The course, which is aligned with the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, serves as an elective or alternative year-long health class for selected high school students in their junior or senior year.   
 
Teen PEP is a team-taught course. Faculty advisors teaching the course “receive special training in sexual health and coordination of activity-based learning” and each year attend two, one-day advanced training sessions.[60]  
 
Students, who must be given parental consent before participating, receive both sexual health education and the “skills needed to facilitate innovative prevention outreach workshops.” The course covers information on a diversity of sexual health issues, including postponing sexual involvement, unintended pregnancy, STDs and HIV/AIDS, “homophobia reduction,” dating violence, and sexual abuse among other issues.[61] After being trained, the students facilitate at least five workshops over the course of the year that are geared toward lower class high school students (ninth and tenth graders) or parents. 
 
The workshops address sexual and reproductive health issues and focus on “enhancing the critical skills needed to promote teen sexual health,” such as “communication (with parents and partners),” negotiation, problem-solving, decision-making, refusal, and self-management skills.[62] Students participating in the workshops must also receive parental consent. 
 
The program is currently operating in more than 50 public high schools across 15 counties in New Jersey.[63] More than 600 peer educators participate in the Teen PEP course.[64]
 
Between 2000 and 2003, Rutgers University conducted an evaluation of Teen PEP.  The program was shown to be effective in impacting students’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors.  Among the peer educators, the evaluation showed that the students were more likely to speak with parents, friends, and partners about sexual health issues, delay sexual initiation, return to abstinence, and reduce their number of sexual partners.  In addition, they were more likely to access reproductive health care services and use condoms and birth control than their peers who were not in the program.  Among workshop participants, students were more likely to speak with parents, friends, and partners about sexual health issues, delay sexual initiation, return to abstinence, reduce their frequency of sex, “abstain from sex while under the influence of alcohol and other drugs,” and “use birth control more often.”[65]
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in New Jersey public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
 
Points of Contact
 
Adolescent Health Contact[66]
Cynthia A. Collins, MS, RD
Program Manager
Child and Adolescent Health Program
New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services
P.O. Box364
Trenton, NJ 08625
Phone: (609) 292-1723
 
PREP State-Grant Coordinator
Gilo Thomas, RN, MSN
Public Health Consultant 1, Nursing
Child and Adolescent Health Program
Division of Family Health Services
New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services
P.O. Box364
Trenton, NJ 08625
Phone: (609)777-7798
 
Title V Abstinence-Only Grant Coordinator
Lakota Kruse, MD, MPH
Director
Maternal and Child Health Services
Division of Family Health Services
New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services
P.O. Box364
Trenton, NJ 08625
Phone: (609) 292-5656
 
 
 
Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
ACLU of New Jersey
Newark, NJ
Phone: (973) 642-2084
 
New JerseyLesbian and Gay Coalition
New Brunswick, NJ
Phone: (732) 828-6772
 
Answer
Piscataway, NJ
Phone: (732) 445-7929
 
New JerseyNational Organization for Women
Trenton, NJ
Phone: (609) 393-0156
 
Family Planning Association
of New Jersey
Trenton, NJ
Phone: (609) 393-8423
 
HiTOPS
Princeton, NJ
Phone: (609) 683-5155
 
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation
New Brunswick, NJ
Phone: (732) 246-0204
 
New JerseyReligious Coalition for Reproductive Choice
Mt. Freedom, NJ
Phone: (973) 984-0118
 
Planned Parenthood of Greater Northern
New Jersey
Morristown, NJ
Phone: (973) 539-9580
 
Sierra Club – New Jersey Chapter
Trenton, NJ
NARAL Pro-Choice New Jersey
Trenton, NJ
Phone: (609) 439-4516
www.prochoicenj.org
 
 
 
 
Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
Free Teens USA
Westwood, NJ
Phone:(201) 488-3733
 
New Jersey Right to Life
Piscataway, NJ
Phone: (732) 562-0563
 
New Jersey Family Policy Council
Parsippany, NJ
Phone: (800) 653-7204
 
 
 
 
Media Outlets
 
Newspapers in New Jersey[67]
Courier News
Bridgewater, NJ
Phone: (908) 722-8800
 
Courier-Post
Cherry Hill, NJ
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Hoboken, NJ
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Trenton, NJ
Phone: (609) 989-5454
 
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[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th.  The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2010 began on October 1, 2009 and ended on September 30, 2010.
[2]N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 18A:35-7 and -8. 
[4]N.J. Admin. Code § 6A:8-3.1;  “Standard 2.4: Human Relationships and Sexuality,” 2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education, (Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Education, 2009), accessed 20 May 2010, <https://www13.state.nj.us/NJCCCS/ContentAreaTableView_Health.aspx
[5]New Jersey Comprehensive Health Education and Physical Education Curriculum Framework (New Jersey; New Jersey Department of Education, 1999), accessed 13 April 2010, <http://www.state.nj.us/education/frameworks/chpe/chapter3.pdf>, 26.
[6]New Jersey Comprehensive Health Education and Physical Education Curriculum Framework (New Jersey; New Jersey Department of Education, 1999), accessed 13 April 2010, <www.state.nj.us/education/frameworks/chpe>.
[7]N.J. Stat. Ann. § 18A:35-4.20. 
[8]N.J. Stat. Ann. § 18A:35-4.21(3). 
[9]N.J. Stat. Ann. § 18A:35-4.7. 
[10]Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>.  
[11]“Births: Final Data for 2008,” National Vital Statistics Report, vol. 59, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 2010), accessed 29 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr59/nvsr59_01.pdf>, Table 12.
[12]“VitalStats: Birth Data Files by State, Age of Mother in Years, 2008,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), accessed 30 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstats/VitalStats_Births.htm>.
[13]U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[14]Ibid., Table 3.2.
[15]U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.3.
[16]This section provides data from 2008, the most recent year for which the CDC has reported HIV/AIDS data for young people ages 13–19. For this reason, all the data presented is from 2008 for the purposes of direct comparison.
[17]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2010), accessed 28 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2008report/pdf/2008SurveillanceReport.pdf>, Table 19.
[18]Ibid.
[19]Slide 9: “Rates of Diagnoses of HIV Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[20]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, Table 20.
[21]Ibid.
[22]Slide 18: “Rates of Diagnoses of AIDS Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[23]“Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[24]Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[25]Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[26]Central Jersey Family Health Consortium, Inc., “About CJFHC,” accessed 3 June 2011, <http://rpcmoc.net/AboutCJFHC.aspx>.
[27]Ibid.
[28]Saras Chung and Annie Philipps, Promoting Mental Health and Well-being in Adolescents: Recommendations for Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program, (Eureka, MO: Wyman Teen Outreach Program, 2010), accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.wymantop.org/pdfs/TOP_Positive_Well-Being.pdf>, 3.
[29]Ibid, 9.
[30]“Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implementation Report: Teen Outreach Program,” Programs for Replication – Intervention Implementation Reports, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/prevention/research/programs/teen_outreach_program.html>.
[31]“Our Program,” The Children’s Aid Society – Carrera Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Program, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://stopteenpregnancy.childrensaidsociety.org/our-program>.
[32]Ibid.
[33]“Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implementation Report: Children’s Aid Society (CAS) – Carrera,” Programs for Replication – Intervention Implementation Reports, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accessed 1 July 2011, <http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/prevention/research/programs/cas_carrera.html>.
[34]Joel Landau, “Program fights to stop teen pregnancy,” The Daily Journal, 19 October 2010, accessed 2 June 2011, <http://www.thedailyjournal.com/article/20101019/NEWS01/10190313/Program-fights-stop-teen-pregnancy>.
[35]Ibid.
[36]“Our Mission,” Princeton Center for Leadership Training, accessed 30 August 2011, <http://www.princetonleadership.org/venture/our-mission>.
[37]“Teen PEP Overview,” Teen PEP, accessed 30 August 2011, <http://www.teenpep.org/overview.cfm>.
[38]“Program Model,” Teen PEP, accessed 30 August 2011, <http://www.teenpep.org/polProgramModel.cfm>.
[39]“New Jersey Personal Responsibility Education Program – Competitive Request for Applications, “ New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (June 2011), accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/documents/prep_rfa_draft.pdf>.
[40]“New Jersey Abstinence Education Project – Competitive Request for Applications,” New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (February 2011), accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/children/documents/rfa.pdf>.
[41]“New Jersey Abstinence Education Program – List of Grantees,” New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/children/documents/grantees.pdf>.
[42]“Message from the Director,” Project YES You Can!, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://projectyesyoucan.org/promo/message-from-the-director/>; see also “Students Respond to Project YES You Can!,” Project YES You Can!, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://projectyesyoucan.org/blog/students-respond-to-project-yes-you-can/>.
[43]“Curriculum,” Project YES You Can!, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://projectyesyoucan.org/educators/curriculum/>.
[44]This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified
[45]“Introduction,” 2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards, (Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Education, 2009), accessed 20 May 2010, <http://www.njcccs.org/Worldclassstandards.aspx>.
[46]Ibid.
[47]2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education.
[48]Ibid., 2.4.4.B.1.
[49]Ibid., 2.4.8.B.2.
[50]Ibid., 2.4.6.B.2; Ibid., 2.4.8.B.2; Ibid., 2.4.12.B.2.
[51]Ibid., 2.4.8.B.3.; Ibid., 2.4.12.B.3.
[52]2009 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education.
[53]Ibid., 2.4.12.A.6.
[54]Ibid.
[55]Ibid., 2.4.8.B.4; Ibid., 2.4.12.B.4.
[56]Ibid., 2.4.6.B.6; Ibid., 2.4.8.B.6.
[57]Ibid., 2.4.8.B.6.
[58]Ibid., 2.4.12.C.6.
[59]“New Jersey Teen Prevention Education Program,” New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, accessed 23 May 2010, <http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/teenpep.shtml#participants>.
[60]Ibid.
[61]Ibid., “Educational Programs for Youth: Peer-Led Programs,” HiTOPS, accessed 23 May 2010, <http://www.hitops.org/educationalprograms/programteens.shtml#peerledprograms>.
[62]Ibid.
[63]Ibid.
[64]“Teen PEP,” HiTOPS, accessed 23 May 2010, <http://www.hitops.org/peereducation/teenpep.shtml>.
[65]”Teen PEP Program Evaluation Results,” New Jersey Teen Prevention Education Program, accessed 23 May 2010, <http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/teenpep.shtml>.
[66]The person listed represents the designated personnel in the state responsible for adolescent reproductive health.
[67]This section is a list of major newspapers in the state and is by no means exhaustive of local print outlets.
 
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