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Connecticut State Profile Fiscal Year 2010

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Sexuality Education Law and Policy | Recent Legislation | Youth Sexual Health Data | Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative | Personal Responsibility Education Program | Title V Abstinence-Only Program | TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only Funding in FY 2010 | Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education | Points of Contact | Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education | Media Outlets | References

 
Connecticut
 
In Fiscal Year 2010[1], the state of Connecticut received:
  • Personal Responsibility Education Program funds totaling $596,440
 
In Fiscal Year 2010, local entities in Connecticut received:
  • Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative funds totaling $900,000
  • Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies funds totaling $832,467
 
 
Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Connecticutdoes not require schools to teach sexuality education, but does require that schools teach human growth and development and disease prevention. Connecticut law also states, “Each local and regional board of education shall offer during the regular school day planned, ongoing and systematic instruction on acquired immune deficiency syndrome, as taught by legally qualified teachers.”[2]
 
The Connecticut State Board of Education is charged with developing family life education curriculum guidelines that “shall include, but not be limited to, information on developing a curriculum including family planning, human sexuality, parenting, nutrition and the emotional, physical, psychological, hygienic, economic and social aspects of family life, provided the curriculum guides shall not include information pertaining to abortion as an alternative to family planning.”[3] However, Connecticut statute also states that the instruction must be left to the discretion of local or regional boards of education.
 
Parents or guardians may remove their children from sexuality education and/or STD/HIV education classes with written notification.  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
 
 
 
Recent Legislation
 
Bill Requiring Parental Notification
Senate Bill 428, introduced in January 2011, would have required all school districts to provide written notification to parents at the beginning of every school year informing them that a family life education program will be offered to students. The bill was referred to the Senate Committee on Education, where it died.
 
 
 
Youth Sexual Health Data
SIECUS has compiled the following data to provide an overview of adolescent sexual health in Connecticut. The data collected represents the most current information available.
 
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) Data[4]
  • In 2009, 38% of female high school students and 43% of male high school students in Connecticut reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 6% of male high school students in Connecticut reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 8% of female high school students and 13% of male high school students in Connecticut reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 30% of female high school students and 29% of male high school students in Connecticut reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 56% of females and 63% of males in Connecticut reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 26% of females and 23% of males in Connecticut reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 22% of females and 28% of males in Connecticut reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 82% of high school students in Colorado reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Connecticut’s teen birth rate currently ranks 48th in the United States, with a rate of 22.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 41.5 births per 1,000.[5] In 2008, there were a total of 2,385 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Connecticut.[6]
 
  • In 2005, Connecticut’s teen pregnancy rate ranked 37h in the United States, with a rate of 57 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[7]  There were a total of 6,880 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in Connecticut.[8]
 
  • In 2005, Connecticut’s teen abortion rate ranked 6th in the United States, with a rate of 26 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000.[9]
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Connecticut’s HIV infection rate ranks 15th in the United States, with a rate of 13.8 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 19.5 cases per 100,000.[10]
 
  • Connecticut ranks 20th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 484 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Connecticut.[11]
 
  • Connecticut’s HIV infection rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 23rd in the United States, with a rate of 5.6 cases per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 9.1 cases per 100,000.[12]
 
  • Connecticut ranks 26th in number of reported AIDS cases in the United States among all age groups. In 2008, there were a total of 354 new AIDS cases reported in Connecticut.[13]
 
  • Connecticut’s AIDS rate ranks 16th in the United States, with a rate of 10.1 cases per 100,000 individuals compared to the national rate of 12.3 cases per 100,000.[14]
 
  • Connecticut’s AIDS rate among young people ages 13–19 ranks 21st in the United States, with a rate of 1.4 case per 100,000 young people compared to the national rate of 1.8 cases per 100,000.[15]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Connecticutranks 30th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 16.81 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 4,220 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Connecticut.[16]
 
  • Connecticutranks 29th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 2.80 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000.  In 2008, there were a total of 702 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Connecticut.[17]
 
  • Connecticutranks 31st in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the United States, with an infection rate of 0.01 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000.[18]
 
 
 
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
The President’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI) funds medically accurate and age-appropriate programs to reduce teen pregnancy. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) administers the grant program, which totaled $110 million in discretionary funding for Fiscal Year 2010. TPPI consists of two funding tiers that provide grants to local public and private entities. Tier 1 totals $75 million and provides funding for the replication of evidence-based programs proven to prevent unintended teen pregnancy and address underlying behavioral risk factors. Tier 2 totals $25 million and provides funding to develop and test additional models and innovative strategies. A portion of the Tier 2 funds, $15.2 million, was allocated for research and demonstration grants to test innovative approaches, while the remaining funding, $9.8 million, was allocated for grants to support communitywide initiatives. TPPI also dedicates $4.5 million in funding to conduct evaluations of individual programs.
 
TPPI Tier 1: Evidence-Based Programs
The TPPI Tier 1 grant program supports the replication of evidence-based programs proven effective through rigorous evaluation to prevent unintended teen pregnancy, underlying behavioral risk factors, or other associated risk factors.
  • There are no TPPI Tier 1 grantees in Connecticut.
 
TPPI Tier 2: Innovative Approaches
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program supports research and demonstration programs in order to develop, replicate, refine, and test additional models and innovative strategies for preventing teenage pregnancy.
  • There are no TPPI Tier 2 Innovative Approaches grantees in Connecticut.
 
TPPI Tier 2: Integrating Services, Programs, and Strategies through Communitywide Initiatives
The TPPI Tier 2 grant program also supports communitywide initiatives to reduce rates of teenage pregnancy and births in communities with the highest rates. The program awards grants to national organizations as well as state- and community-based organizations. Funded national partners provide training and technical assistance to local grantees. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) administer the grant program in partnership with OAH.
  • There is one TPPI Tier 2 Communitywide Initiatives grantee in Connecticut, the City of Hartford, which received $900,000 for Fiscal Year 2010.
 
City of Hartford, $900,000 (2010–2014)
The City of Hartford, Department of Health and Human Services administers the city’s TPPI Tier 2 grant, which employs a multi-faceted strategy to provide teen pregnancy-prevention programming and clinical services to young people ages 13–19. The initiative primarily serves African-American and Latino youth from low-income communities. In addition, it works to educate community stakeholders and develop strategies to institutionalize programming and promote sustainability. The Department of Health and Human Services partners with several government agencies and local public and private entities to implement coordinated program services, including the Hartford Action Plan on Infant Health, Hartford Office of Youth Services, Hartford Public Schools system, 10 youth service agencies and six community health clinics as well as additional private sector partners.[19]
 
 
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program
The Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) totals $75 million per year for Fiscal Years 2010–2014 and is the first-ever dedicated funding stream for more comprehensive approaches to sexuality education. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF) administers the grant. PREP includes a $55 million state-grant program, $10 million to fund local entities through the Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS) Program, $3.5 million for Indian tribes and tribal organizations, and $6.5 million for evaluation, training, and technical assistance. Details on the state-grant program and PREIS are included below. At the time of publication, the funding for tribes and tribal organizations had not yet been awarded.
 
PREP State-Grant Program
The PREP state-grant program supports evidence-based programs that provide young people with medically accurate and age-appropriate information for the prevention of unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The grant program totals $55 million per year and allocates funding to individual states. The grant does not require states to provide matching funds. Funded programs must discuss abstinence and contraception, and place substantial emphasis on both. Programs must also address at least three of the following adulthood preparation subjects: healthy relationships, positive adolescent development, financial literacy, parent-child communication skills, education and employment skills, and healthy life skills.
  •  The State of Connecticut Department of Public Health received $596,440 in federal PREP funds for Fiscal Year 2010.
 
The State of Connecticut Department of Public Health uses the state’s PREP funds to provide sexuality education to youth in foster care across the state. The department partners with the State Department of Children and Families to serve youth ages 13–19 who are living in state-run facilities. This includes therapeutic group homes and Preparation for Adult Living facilities as well as youth enrolled in the Transitional Living Assistance Program, the Support Work Employment Training Program, and those who attend state-run residential schools.  Programming is provided in a total of 47 facilities. Connecticut PREP uses two curricula to provide programming to youth: Making Proud Choices! and Teen Talk.[20]
 
Making Proud Choices! is an evidence-based STD-, HIV-, and pregnancy-prevention curriculum for young adolescents ages 11–13 that is designed for use with African-American, Latino, and white populations.  The curriculum aims to help youth understand the poor reasoning and decision making that can lead to STD/HIV infection and/or unintended pregnancy, as well as to increase their confidence, negotiation skills, and self-efficacy in using condoms. The program consists of eight, one-hour sessions and can be implemented in school- or community-based settings. Making Proud Choices! includes interactive and skill-building activities that are designed to “increase comfort with practicing condom use, address concerns about negative effects of practicing safer sex, and build skills in condom use and negotiation.”[21] Findings from an evaluation of the program published in the Journal of the American Medical Association show that program participants reported more consistent condom use and less unprotected sex as well as a higher frequency of condom use than those in the control group.[22]
 
Teen Talk is a sexuality education program developed by the Teen Pregnancy Coalition of San Mateo County, California that is intended to reduce unintended pregnancy and STD/HIV incidence among young people. Teen Talk is designed for classroom use and includes two curricula, one for middle school students and one for high school students. Each curriculum contains eight to 10 hours worth of instruction. The curricula address a broad range of sexuality and sexual health topics, including personal values and beliefs, parent-child communication, human growth and development, healthy relationships, STD/HIV education, birth control, abstinence, sexual decision-making, sexual violence prevention, and sexual identity among others. The curricula also include interactive activities to foster personal skill development. Teen Talk is medically accurate and appropriate for use with multi-ethnic groups.[23]
 
Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies (PREIS)
The PREIS Program supports research and demonstration programs to develop, replicate, refine, and test innovative models for preventing unintended teen pregnancy. ACF administers the grant program in collaboration with OAH and provides a total of $10 million in funding directly to local public and private entities.
  • There is one PREIS grantee in Connecticut, The Village for Families & Children, Inc., which received $832,467 for Fiscal Year 2010.
 
The Village for Families & Children, Inc., $832,467 (2010–2014)
The Village for Families & Children is a private, non-profit mental health and human services agency that offers “programs and services for all age groups to ensure families and children in Hartford thrive physically and emotionally and become happy and productive citizens.”[24] The agency offers programs and services in three core areas: Placement and Permanency, including adoption, foster care, and family preservation programs, Children’s Behavioral Health, and Family and Community Support.[25]
 
The organization uses its PREIS funding to conduct a trial of FatherWorks, an intervention designed to reduce the incidence of repeat fatherhood among young men.  The trial includes 330 Latino and African-American young men in Hartford and Hartford County, ages 15–24, who have fathered a child with a woman under the age of 21. 
 
FatherWorks “is a comprehensive intervention” that provides participants with the “motivation, opportunities and skills needed to change risk behavior.”[26] The program includes parenting and co-parenting education, case management services, clinical group and individual therapy services, sex education, and vocational and employment opportunities.[27] Other services include anger management education, relationship skills, financial literacy, activities involving participants’ children, and emergency financial assistance. 
 
 
 
Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program
The Title V State Abstinence Education Grant Program (Title V Abstinence-Only Program) allocates $50 million per year to states for Fiscal Years 2010–2014. ACF administers the grant program. The Title V Abstinence-Only Program requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups. All programs funded by the Title V Abstinence-Only Program must promote abstinence from sexual activity as their exclusive purpose and may provide mentoring, counseling, and adult supervision toward this end. Programs must be medically accurate and age-appropriate and must ensure abstinence is an expected outcome.
  • Connecticutchose not to apply for Title V abstinence-only funds for Fiscal Year 2010.
 
 
 
Connecticut TPPI, PREP, and Title V Abstinence-Only Funding in FY 2010
Grantee
Award
Fiscal Years
Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative (TPPI)
TPPI Tier 2: Communitywide Initiatives
City of Hartford
$900,000
2010–2014
TOTAL
$900,000
 
Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP)
PREP State-Grant Program
State of Connecticut Department of Public Health
(federal grant)
$596,440
2010
TOTAL
$596,440
 
Personal Responsibility Education Innovative Strategies
 The Village for Families & Children, Inc.
$832,467
2010–2014
TOTAL
$832,467
 
 
GRAND TOTAL
$2,328,907
2010
 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sexuality Education
 
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Connecticut public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Connecticut public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information.  Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
 
Points of Contact
 
Adolescent Health Contact[28]
Donna Maselli, RN, MPH
Nurse Consultant
Connecticut Department of Public Health
410 Capitol Avenue
MS #11 MAT
Hartford, CT 06106
Phone: (860) 509-7505
 
PREP State-Grant Coordinator
Donna Maselli, RN, MPH
Nurse Consultant
Connecticut Department of Public Health
410 Capitol Avenue
MS #11 MAT
Hartford, CT 06106
Phone: (860) 509-7505
 
 
 
Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
ACLU of Connecticut
Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 523-9146
 
NARAL Pro-Choice Connecticut
West Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 523-1227
www.pro-choicect.org
 
Hartford Gay and Lesbian Health Collective
Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 278-4163
 
Planned Parenthood of Connecticut
New Haven, CT
Phone: (203) 865-5158
 
 
GLSEN Connecticut
Stamford, CT
Phone: (203) 288-2399
 
The Triangle Community Center
Norwalk, CT
Phone: (203) 853-0600
 
 
 
 
 
 
Latino Community Services
Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 296-6400
 
 
 
Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
 
Connecticut Right to Life
Waterbury, CT
Phone: (203) 757-5213
 
Family Institute of Connecticut
Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 548-0066
 
 
 
Media Outlets
 
Newspapers in Connecticut[29]
Connecticut Post
Bridgeport, CT
Phone: (203) 333-0161
 
The Day
New London, CT
Phone: (860) 701-4372
 
The Hartford Courant
Hartford, CT
Phone: (860) 241-6200
 
Journal Inquirer
Manchester, CT
Phone: (860) 646-0500
 
New Haven Register
New Haven, CT
Phone: (203) 789-5730
 
The News-Times
Danbury, CT
Phone: (203) 744-5100
 
The Norwalk Advocate
Stamford, CT
Phone: (203) 750-5325
 
Norwich Bulletin
Norwich, CT
Phone: (860) 887-9211
 
Record-Journal
Meriden, CT
Phone: (203) 317-2245
Waterbury Republican-American
Waterbury, CT
Phone: (203) 574-3636ext. 1443
 
 
Political Blogs in Connecticut
Blogs.courant
 
CT Progressive
 
My Left Nutmeg
 
 
 
 

[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th.  The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2010 began on October 1, 2009 and ended on September 30, 2010.
[4]Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[5]“Births: Final Data for 2008,” National Vital Statistics Report, vol. 59, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, December 2010), accessed 29 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr59/nvsr59_01.pdf>, Table 12.
[6]“VitalStats: Birth Data Files by State, Age of Mother in Years, 2008,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), accessed 30 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstats/VitalStats_Births.htm>.
[7]U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[8]Ibid., Table 3.2.
[9]U.S.Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.3.
[10]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 2010), accessed 28 June 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/surveillance/resources/reports/2008report/pdf/2008SurveillanceReport.pdf.> Table 19.
[11]Ibid.
[12]Slide 9: “Rates of Diagnoses of HIV Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[13]HIV Surveillance Report, 2008, Table 20.
[14]Ibid.
[15]Slide 18: “Rates of Diagnoses of AIDS Infection among Adolescents Aged13–19 Years, 2009—40 States and 5 U.S. Dependent Areas,” HIV Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, July 2011), accessed 27 September 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[16]“Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[17]Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[18]Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[19]“Teenage Pregnancy Prevention: Integrating Services, Programs, and Strategies through Communitywide Initiatives – State- and Community-Based Organizations,” Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2 March 2011, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.cdc.gov/TeenPregnancy/State-Community-Orgs.htm>.
[20]Information provided by Donna Maselli, nurse consultant for the Connecticut Department of Public Health, 28 February 2011.
[21]“Making Proud Choices!” Evidence-Based Programs, Resource Center for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention (ReCAPP), ETR Associates, accessed 15 April 2010, <http://www.etr.org/recapp/index.cfm?fuseaction=pages.ebpDetail&PageID=128>.
[22]Ibid.
[23]“Program Description,” Teen Talk Sexuality Education, accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.teentalkca.org/teachers/program-description/>.
[24]“FatherWorks Program,” The Village for Family and Children, Inc., accessed 5 September 2011, <http://www.villageforchildren.org/images/stories/PDF/Brochure.pdf>.
[25]“Welcome to the Village,” The Village for Families & Children, Inc., accessed 29 August 2011, <http://www.villageforchildren.org/>.
[26]“Teen Pregnancy Prevention through Responsible Fathering: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the FatherWorks Program,” Application for Federal Funds SF-424, FY10 Teenage Pregnancy Prevention: Research and Demonstration Programs (Tier 2) and Personal Responsibility Education Program, The Village for Families & Children, Inc., (June 2010), 1. Information obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request submitted to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health.
[27]“Services and Programs Listing,” The Village for Family and Children, Inc., accessed 5 September 2011, <http://www.villageforchildren.org/en/our-work/all-services-and-programs.html>.
[28]The person listed represents the designated personnel in the state responsible for adolescent reproductive health. 
[29]This section is a list of major newspapers in the state and is by no means exhaustive of local print outlets.
 
National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education