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Wyoming State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Wyoming

 
 
Wyoming Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Wyoming does not require sexuality, HIV/AIDS, or sexually transmitted disease (STD)-prevention education, nor does it limit what can be taught if such education is offered.  Schools are required to provide health education programs; and developmentally appropriate sexuality education concepts and benchmarks are included in the Wyoming Health Content and Performance Standards.[1]  In addition, the Wyoming Department of Education created the HIV/AIDS Model Policy for Wyoming Public Schools, which recommends standards for HIV/AIDS-prevention education. According to these standards, “the goals of HIV prevention education are to promote healthful living and discourage the behaviors that put people at risk of acquiring HIV.”[2]  
 
This educational program should:
  • be taught at every level, kindergarten through grade twelve;
  • use methods demonstrated by sound research to be effective;
  • be consistent with community standards;
  • follow content guidelines prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC);
  • be appropriate to students’ developmental levels, behaviors, and cultural backgrounds;
  • build knowledge and skills from year to year;
  • stress the benefits of abstinence from sexual activity, alcohol, and other drug use;
  • include accurate information on reducing risk of HIV infection;
  • address students’ own concerns;
  • include means for evaluation;
  • be an integral part of a coordinated school health program;
  • be taught by well-prepared instructors with adequate support; and
  • involve parents, families, and communities as partners in education.[3]
 
The state does not recommend a specific curriculum. School districts are encouraged to “organize a health advisory council” comprised of educators, administrators, parents, students, medical professionals, representatives from minority groups, and other community members to “develop policies and approve curriculum and other materials for school health education including K-12 HIV prevention education.”[4] In addition, materials for HIV-AIDS and health education approved by the Department of Education are available at no cost to schools.[5] Educators are encouraged to have their students participate in extracurricular HIV/AIDS awareness activities, and are cautioned that “[a] single film, lecture, or school assembly is not sufficient to assure that students develop the complex understanding and skills needed to avoid HIV infection (emphasis in original).”[6]  In addition, schools should provide counseling and information about HIV-related community services.   
 
The HIV/AIDS Model Policy for Wyoming Public Schools states that parents or guardians can ask that their children not receive HIV/AIDS-prevention education.[7]  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
See Wyoming Statutes § 21-9-101, Wyoming Content and Performance Standards, HIV/AIDS Model Policy for Wyoming Public Schools, and http://www.k12.wy.us/HS/cshp.asp
 
 
Recent Legislation
SIECUS is not aware of any proposed legislation regarding sexuality education inWyoming.
 
 
Wyoming’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[8]
  • In 2009, 52% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students in Wyoming reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in Wyoming reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 17% of female high school students and 19% of male high school students in Wyoming reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 40% of female high school students and 35% of male high school students in Wyoming reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 57% of females and 67% of males in Wyoming reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 31% of females and 16% of males in Wyoming reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 19% of females and 30% of males in Wyoming reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 85% of high school students in Wyoming reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Wyoming Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Wyoming’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 24th in the U.S., with a rate of 65 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[9] There were a total of 1,190 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data is available, in Wyoming.[10]
 
  • Wyoming’s teen birth rate ranked 18th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 43.2 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[11] In 2005, there were a total of 795 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Wyoming.[12]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[13]  Wyoming’s teen birth rate also increased between 2005 and 2006, from 43.2 to 47.3 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[14] 
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Wyoming ranks 46th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 12 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Wyoming. [15]
 
  • In 2007, there were no young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Wyoming.[16]
 
  • Wyoming’s AIDS rate ranks 46th in the U.S., with a rate of 2.5 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[17]
 
  • Wyoming ranks 49th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 13 new AIDS cases reported in Wyoming.[18]
 
  • Wyoming ranks 35th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there was a total of 1 AIDS case reported among young people ages 13–19 in Wyoming.[19]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Wyoming ranks 40th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 13.71 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 509 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Wyoming.[20] 
 
  • Wyoming ranks 41st in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 1.02 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 38 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Wyoming.[21] 
 
  • There are no available statewide data on the rate of syphilis among young people. 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Wyoming public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Wyoming public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
Wyoming did not receive abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009.[22]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Wyoming chose not to participate in the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program in Fiscal Year 2009. The state was eligible for approximately $73,188 in funding. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state would have received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • There are no CBAE grantees in Wyoming.
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There are no AFLA grantees in Wyoming.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula  
SIECUS is not aware of any commercially available abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula used in Wyoming.
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[23]
Zaffer Sharif
Children and Families Initiative
Wyoming Department of Family Services
Hathaway Building
Cheyenne, WY 82002
Phone: (307) 777-6203
 
 
Wyoming Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
NARAL Pro-Choice Wyoming
P.O. Box 271
Laramie, WY 82073
Phone: (307) 742-9189
 
Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains
7155 East 38th Avenue
Denver, CO 80207
Phone: (303) 321-PLAN
 
Wyoming Health Council
1920 Thomes Avenue, Suite 100
Cheyenne, WY  82001
Phone: (307) 632-3640
Wyoming ACLU
P.O. Box 20706
Cheyenne, WY 82003
Phone: (307) 637-4565
 
 
Wyoming Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Roman Catholic Diocese of Cheyenne
2121 Capitol Avenue
Cheyenne, WY 82001
Phone: (307) 638-1530
Right to Life of Wyoming
P.O. Box 1208
Casper, WY 82602
Phone: (307) 266-1234
 
 
Newspapers in Wyoming[24]
Casper Star-Tribune
Newsroom
170 Star Lane
Casper, WY 82604
Phone: (307) 266-0500
 
Laramie Daily Boomerang
Newsroom
320 E. Grand Avenue
Laramie, WY 82070
Phone: (307) 742-2176
Wyoming Tribune-Eagle
Newsroom
702 W. Lincolnway
Cheyenne, WY 82001
Phone: (307) 634-3361
 
 
 
Political Blogs in Wyoming
hummingbirdminds
New West
 
 


[1] Wis. Stat. § 21-9-101. 
[2] HIV/AIDS Model Policy for Wyoming Public Schools (Cheyenne, WY; Wyoming Department of Education, 1998), accessed 27 April 2010, <http://www.k12.wy.us/HS/hivpolicy.pdf>, 8. 
[3] Ibid. 
[4] Ibid., 14. 
[5] “Welcome to Comprehensive School Health Education,” Wyoming Department of Education, accessed 27 April 2010, <http://www.k12.wy.us/HS/cshp.asp>.
[6] HIV/AIDS Model Policy for Wyoming Public Schools, 15. 
[7] Ibid., 8. 
[8] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[10] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[11] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[13] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006.”
[14] Ibid., Table B.
[15] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf>, Table 18.
[16] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[17] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[18] Ibid., Table 16.
[19] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[20] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[21] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[22] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[23] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[24] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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