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Texas State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Texas


 
Texas Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Texas Education Code states that all “course materials and instruction relating to human sexuality” must:
  • present abstinence from sexual activity as the preferred choice of behavior in relationship to all sexual activity for unmarried persons of school age;
  • devote more attention to abstinence from sexual activity than to any other behavior;
  • emphasize that abstinence from sexual activity, if used consistently and correctly, is the only method that is 100% effective in preventing pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the emotional trauma associated with adolescent sexual activity;
  • direct adolescents to a standard of behavior in which abstinence from sexual activity before marriage is the most effective way to prevent pregnancy, STDs, and infection with HIV or AIDS; and
  • teach contraception and condom use in terms of human use reality rates instead of theoretical laboratory rates, if instruction on contraception and condoms is included in curriculum content.[1]
In addition, school districts may not distribute condoms and are allowed to “separate students according to sex for instructional purposes.”[2] 
 
      In 2009, using authority given to it by the state legislature, the Texas Board of Education voted to repeal the state’s existing health education requirement. Though the specifics of what may and may not be taught remain in the Texas Education Code, schools may now choose whether or not to offer health education courses.
 
      Each school district must also have a local health advisory council established by the board of trustees.[3]  The council must make recommendations to the school district about changes in that district’s curriculum and “appropriate grade levels and methods of instruction for human sexuality instruction.”[4] This council also must “assist the district in ensuring that local community values are reflected in the district’s health education instruction.”[5]

      Parents or guardians may remove their children from any part of sexuality education instruction if it conflicts with their “religious or moral beliefs” by submitting a written request to the teacher.[6] This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
See Texas Administrative Code §§ 74.1, 74.2, 74.3, and 74.41; Texas Education Code §§ 28.004 and 26.010; and Texas State Board of Education Administrative Code §§ 115.22 and 115.23.  
 
 
Recent Legislation
Texas Education Works Act Introduced
House Bill 741 and Senate Bill 515, introduced in January 2009, would have mandated that all sexuality education in Texas be age-appropriate and medically accurate. In addition, such instruction would have included information on the health benefits, safety, and effectiveness of all methods of preventing STDs and pregnancy that are approved by the Food and Drug Administration, as well as resources for STD testing and treatment. Under HB 741 and SB 515 sexuality education would have also encouraged parent-child communication about sexuality and addressed responsible decision-making. Both bills died in committee. 
 
Legislation Prohibiting Federal Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
House Bill 1371, introduced in February 2009, would have prohibited the Texas Health and Services Commission from applying for or accepting federal funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. The bill was referred to the Committee on Public Health, where it died. 
 
Legislation Requiring Sexuality Education to be Scientifically Accurate
House Bill 1567 and Senate Bill 1076, introduced in February 2009, would have required that sexuality education instruction in Texas stress abstinence, but also include scientifically accurate information on contraception and not discourage students from using contraceptives. Both bills died in committee. 
 
Texas Prevention Works Act Introduced
House Bill 1694 and Senate Bill 1100, introduced in February 2009, would have required sexuality education instruction in Texas to be medically accurate. In addition, it would have required parents to be notified prior to the start of the course and the notification would have had to specify whether abstinence would be the primary focus and whether or not such instruction would include information on contraception. Both bills died in committee.
 
 
Texas’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[7]
  • In 2009, 49% of female high school students and 54% of male high school students in Texas reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in Texas reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 13% of female high school students and 20% of male high school students in Texas reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 39% of female high school students and 37% of male high school students in Texas reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 53% of females and 63% of males in Texas reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 17% of females and 10% of males in Texas reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 18% of females and 25% of males in Texas reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 83% of high school students in Texas reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Dallas, Texas
  • In 2009, 49% of female high school students and 63% of male high school students in Dallas, Texas reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in Dallas, Texas reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 10% of female high school students and 24% of male high school students in Dallas, Texas reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 37% of female high school students and 43% of male high school students in Dallas, Texas reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 51% of females and 69% of males in Dallas, Texas reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 9% of females and 4% of males in Dallas, Texas reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 12% of females and 24% of males in Dallas, Texas reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 80% of high school students in Dallas, Texas reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Texas Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Texas’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 5th in the U.S., with a rate of 88 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[8] There were a total of 73,270 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Texas.[9]
 
  • Texas’s teen birth rate ranked 2nd in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 61.6 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[10] In 2005, there were a total of 51,180 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Texas.[11]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[12] In contrast, Texas’s teen birth rate increased 2% between 2005 and 2006, from 61.6 to 63.1 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.
 
  • Texas’s teen abortion rate ranks 15th in the U.S., with a rate of 16 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 10,301 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Texas.[13]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Texas ranks 4th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 2,507 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Texas. [14]
 
  • Texas ranks 3rd in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 213 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Texas.[15]
 
  • Texas’s AIDS rate ranks 14th in the U.S., with a rate of 12.4 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[16]
 
  • Texas ranks 4th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 2,964 new AIDS cases reported in Texas.[17]
 
  • Texas ranks 4th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 38 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Texas.[18]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Texas ranks 21st in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 20.06 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 35,038 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Texas.[19] 
 
  • Texas ranks 16th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 5.49 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 9,592 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Texas.[20] 
 
  • Texas ranks 4th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.08 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 142 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Texas.[21] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in Texas public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[22]
 
Comprehensive Sexuality Education Curricula
Some Texas school districts are transitioning from an abstinence-only-until-marriage approach to more comprehensive sex education programming in response to rising teen pregnancy rates.  Austin Independent School District, Hays Consolidated Independent School District, and Lufkin Independent School District all adopted sex education curricula that teach about both abstinence and contraception for the 2009–2010 school year.  In addition, school districts in San Antonio and the Rio Grande Valley are also using more comprehensive sex education programs.  Houston Independent School District, the state’s largest school district, is also considering implementing a more comprehensive sex education curriculum beginning in the 2010–2011 school year.[23]
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Texas public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of State Health Services and community-based organizations in Texas received $10,225,188 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[24]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Texas received $3,283,437 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Texas Department of State Health Services distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to 21 sub-grantees, including 12 community-based organizations, two health centers, two school districts, two universities, one crisis pregnancy center, one faith-based organization, and one hospital.
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Texas, sub-grantees contributed to the match through a combination of direct revenue and in-kind services.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Public and private entities in Texas received $5,393,751 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are ten CBAE grantees in Texas, including four community-based organizations, two abstinence-only-until-marriage industry leaders, one crisis pregnancy center, one faith-based organization, one health center, and one university. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • Organizations in Texas received $1,548,000 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are four AFLA grantees in Texas, including two community-based organizations and two faith-based organizations. 
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Texas use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to: 
  • Choosing the Best
  • Sex Can Wait
  • WAIT Training
  • Why kNOw
  • Worth the Wait
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[25]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Texas Department of
State Health Services
 
 
 
$3,583,437
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Abstinence America
 
 
$61,516
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Alternative Community Development Services
 
 
 
$454,922
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Arlington Independent
School District.
 
 
$252,173
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Austin Learning Academy
 
 
 
 
$473,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Austin LifeCare
 
 
 
$70,425
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
$582,900
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Baptist Child and Family Services
 
 
 
 
$300,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Baptist Children’s Home Ministries
 
 
 
$395,500
 
(2006–2011)
 
$300,000
 
(2004–2009)
 
Change Happens!
(formerly Families Under Social Attack)
 
 
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Colorado Independent
School District
 
 
$51,033
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Communities in Schools of
Corpus Christi
 
 
 
$379,119
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Fifth Ward Enrichment Program
 
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Fisher County Healthcare Development Corporation
 
 
 
$73,677
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
$542,500
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
 
Girls Incorporated of
Metropolitan Dallas
 
 
$60,783
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Girls Incorporated of
Tarrant County
 
 
$50,626
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Henderson County HELP Center, Inc.
 
 
 
$426,316
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
JOVEN—Juvenile Outreach Vocational/Educational Network
 
 
$143,578
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Lamar County Coalition of
Education, Business, and Industry
 
 
$159,632
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Longview Wellness Center
 
 
$158,863
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
McLennan County Collaborative Abstinence Project
 
 
$131,724
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Medical Institute
 
 
 
 
$598,324
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
Memorial Medical Center
 
 
$68,577
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
New Hope Counseling Center Inc.
 
$115,497
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Planned Parenthood Center of
El Paso[26]
 
$51,637
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Shannon Health System
 
 
$195,359
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
$600,000
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
 
Skillful Living Center Inc.
 
$129,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Southwest Community Economic Development Corporation
 
 
$97,828
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Texas College
 
 
$134,229
 
(sub-grant)
 
$600,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
The Urban League of Greater Dallas and North Central Texas Inc.
 
 
$121,808
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
 
 
$344,777
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Worth the Wait, Inc.
 
 
 
$593,289
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[27]
Rachel Samsel, MSSW
State Adolescent Health Coordinator
Division of Family and Community Health
Texas Department of State Health Services
1100 West 49th Street
Austin, TX 78756
Phone: (512) 458-7111
 
 
Texas Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Texas
P.O. Box 12905
Austin, TX 78711
Phone: (512) 478-7300
NARAL Pro-Choice Texas
P.O. Box 684602
Austin, TX 78768
Phone: (512) 462-1661
 
Planned Parenthood of Houston
and Southeast Texas
3601 Fannin Street
Houston, TX 77004
Phone: (713) 522-6363
www.plannedparenthood.org/pphset
 
Planned Parenthood of North Texas
7424 Greenville Avenue, Suite 206
Dallas, TX 75231
Phone: (214) 363-2004

 
Planned Parenthood of San Antonio and
South Central Texas
104 Babcock Road
San Antonio, TX 78201
Phone: (210) 736-2244
 
Planned Parenthood of Texas Capital Region
201 East Ben White Boulevard
Austin, TX 78704
Phone: (512) 275-0171
 
Texas Freedom Network
P.O. Box 1624
Austin, TX 78767
Phone: (512) 322-0545
 
 
Women’s Health and Family Planning Association of Texas
P.O. Box 3868
Austin, TX 78764
Phone: (512) 448-4857
Valley AIDS Council
1217 Chicago Avenue
McAllen, TX 78501
Phone: (800) 333-7432
Youth First Texas
3918 Harry Hines Boulevard
Dallas, Texas 75219
Phone: 214.879.0400
 
 
Texas Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Aim for Success
P.O. Box 550336
Dallas, TX 75355
Phone: (972) 422-2322
 
Free Market Foundation
2001 West Plano Parkway, Suite 1600
Plano, Texas 75075
Phone: (972) 941-4444
 
Life Dynamics
P.O. Box 2226
Denton, TX 76202
Phone: (940) 380-8800
 
The Medical Institute
1101 South Capital of Texas Highway
Building B, Suite 100
Austin, TX 78746
Phone: (512) 328-6269
 
Texas Alliance for Life
2026 Guadalupe Street
Austin, TX 78705
Phone: (512) 477-1244
 
 
Texas Right To Life Committee
6776 Southwest Freeway, Suite 430
Houston, TX 77074
Phone: (713) 782- LIFE
 
Wonderful Days
3200 Riverfront, Suite 100
Fort Worth, TX 76107
Phone: (817) 335-5000
 
 
 
Newspapers in Texas[28]
Austin American-Statesman
Newsroom
305 South Congress Avenue
Austin, TX 78704
Phone: (512) 445-1718
 
Austin Chronicle
Newsroom
4000 North I H 35
Austin, TX 78751
Phone: (512) 454-5766
 
Beaumont Enterprise
Newsroom
380 Main Street
Beaumont, TX 77701
Phone: (409) 833-3311
 
Corpus Christi Caller-Times
Newsroom
820 North Lower Broadway Street
Corpus Christi, TX 78401
Phone: (361) 866-3600
 
Dallas Morning News
Newsroom
508 Young Street
Dallas, TX 75202
Phone: (214) 977-8222
 
El Paso Times
Newsroom
El Paso, TX 79901
Phone: (915) 546-6119
 
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Newsroom
400 West 7th Street
Fort Worth, TX 76102
Phone: (817) 390-7400
 
Houston Chronicle
Newroom
801 Texas Avenue
Houston, TX 77210
Phone: (713) 362-7171
Longview News-Journal
Newsroom
320 East Methvin Street
Longview, TX 75601
Phone: (903) 237-7777
 
Lubbock Avalanche-Journal
Newsroom
710 Avenue J
Lubbock, TX 79401
Phone: (806) 762-8844
 
San Antonio Express-News
Newsroom
Avenue E at Third Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
Phone: (210) 250-3171
 
 
 
Political Blogs in Texas
The Agonist
Burnt Orange Report
 
Capitol Annex
 
Grits for Breakfast
 
South Texas Chisme
Texas Liberal
 
 


[1] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 28.004(e)(1)–(5), <http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/ED/pdf/ED.28.pdf>. 
[2] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 28.004(f) and (g). 
[3] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 28.004(a). 
[4] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 28.004(c)(3). 
[5] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 28.004(a). 
[6] Tex. Ed. Code §§ 26.010(a). 
[7] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: Dallas also participated in the 2009 YRBS. 
[8] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[9] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[10] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[11] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[12] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[13] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3,5.
[14] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[15] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[16] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[17] Ibid., Table 16.
[18] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[19] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[20] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[21] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[22] This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified.  
[23] Brenda Bell, “Some Texas Districts Change Tune on Abstinence-Only Sex Ed,” Austin American-Statesman, 27 September 2009, accessed 4 October 2009, <http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/2009/09/27/0927abstinence.html>.
[24] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[25] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009.
[26] Closed on June 30, 2009. See “El Paso Closing Information,” Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/newsroom/politics-policy-issues/el-paso-closing-information-30208.htm>.
[27] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[28] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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