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South Dakota State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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South Dakota

 
 
South Dakota Sexuality Education Law and Policy
South Dakota law does not specifically mention sexuality education; however, public schools must conform to the educational standards established by the state Board of Education.[1] The South Dakota Health Education Standards specify that a comprehensive health education program should include instruction on sexuality.[2] The Standards also include the connection between sexual activity and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) as a suggested objective of comprehensive health education beginning in grade eight.[3]  
In addition, schools are required to teach “character development instruction,” which includes sexual abstinence.[4]
 
South Dakota does not require parental permission for students to participate in sexuality or HIV/AIDS education nor does it say whether parents or guardians can remove their children from such classes.

See South Dakota Codified Laws §§ 13-33-1 and 13-33-6.1 and the South Dakota Health Education Standards.
 
 
Recent Legislation
SIECUS is not aware of any proposed legislation regarding sexuality education in South Dakota.
 
 
South Dakota’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[5]
  • In 2009, 47% of female high school students and 47% of male high school students in South Dakota reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in South Dakota reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 14% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in South Dakota reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
  
  • In 2009, 39% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students in South Dakota reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 55% of females and 69% of males in South Dakota reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 25% of females and 19% of males in South Dakota reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 23% of females and 24% of males in South Dakota reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 78% of high school students in South Dakota reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
South Dakota Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • South Dakota’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 41st in the U.S., with a rate of 51 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[6] There were a total of 1,480 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in South Dakota.[7]
 
  • South Dakota’s teen birth rate ranked 28th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 37.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[8] In 2005, there were a total of 1,082 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in South Dakota.[9]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[10] South Dakota’s teen birth rate also increased between 2005 and 2006, from 37.5 to 40.2 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[11] 
 
  • South Dakota’s teen abortion rate ranks 44th in the U.S., with a rate of 5 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 122 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in South Dakota.[12]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • South Dakota ranks 45th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 16 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in South Dakota. [13]
 
  • South Dakota ranks 31st in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there was a total of 1 young person ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in South Dakota.[14]
 
  • South Dakota’s AIDS rate ranks 48th in the U.S., with a rate of 1.9 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[15]
 
  • South Dakota ranks 48th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 15 new AIDS cases reported in South Dakota.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • South Dakota ranks 31st in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 16.73 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 972 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in South Dakota.[17] 
 
  • South Dakota ranks 37th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 1.65 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 96 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in South Dakota.[18]
 
  • There are no available statewide data on the rate of syphilis among young people.
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in South Dakota public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people. 
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in South Dakota public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health and community-based organizations in South Dakota received $1,248,879 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[19]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • South Dakota received $136,379 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  •  The South Dakota Department of Health distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to four sub-grantees, including two community-based organizations, one abstinence-only-until-marriage industry leader, and one crisis pregnancy center. 
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In South Dakota, sub-grantees contributed to the match through in-kind services and donations. 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in South Dakota received $1,112,500 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are two CBAE grantees in South Dakota, including one community-based organization and one crisis pregnancy center. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There are no AFLA grantees in South Dakota.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
SIECUS is not aware of any commercially available curricula used by abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in South Dakota. 
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[20]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
South Dakota Department of Health
 
 
$136,379
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Alpha Center
 
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Bella Pregnancy Resource Center (Formerly Northern Hills Pregnancy Care Center)
 
 
$25,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Girl Scouts—Dakota Horizons
 
 
$5,700
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Growing Up Together
 
 
$18,900
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
National Abstinence Clearinghouse
 
 
$35,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Rural America Initiatives
 
 
 
$512,500
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[21]
Nancy Hoyme
Office of Community Health Services
South Dakota Department of Health
600 E. Capitol Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: (605) 773-2980
 
 
South Dakota Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of the Dakotas
401 East 8th Street, Suite 203A
Sioux Falls, SD 57103
Phone: (605) 332-2508
 
Equality South Dakota
P.O. Box 2854
Sioux Falls, SD 57101
NARAL Pro-Choice South Dakota
401 East 8th Street, Suite 330G
Sioux Falls, SD 57103
Phone: (605) 334-5065
Planned Parenthood of South Dakota
619 Mountain View Road
Rapid City, SD 57702
 
 
 
South Dakota Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Abstinence Clearinghouse
801 East 41st Street
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
Phone: (605) 335-3643
 
Catholic Social Services
918 5th Street
Rapid City, SD 57701
Phone: (605) 348-6086
 
South Dakota Family Policy Council
3500 South Phillips Avenue, Suite 110
Sioux Falls, SD 57105
Phone: (605) 335-8100
 
South Dakota Right to Life
P.O. Box 1032
314 South Central
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: (605) 224-9181
 
 
Newspapers in South Dakota[22]
Aberdeen American News
Newsroom
124 South 2nd Street
Aberdeen, SD 57401
Phone: (605) 622-4100
 
Argus Leader
Newsroom
200 South Minnesota Avenue
Sioux Falls, SD 57104
Phone: (605) 331-2300
Brookings Register
Newsroom
312 5th Street
Brookings, SD 57006
Phone: (605) 692-6271
 
Capital Journal
Newsroom
333 West Dakota Avenue
Pierre, SD 57501
Phone: (605) 224-7301
Rapid City Journal
Newsroom
507 Main Street
Rapid City, SD 57701
Phone: (605) 394-8402
 
 
 
Political Blogs in South Dakota
Dakota Today
Madville Times
 
Robbinsdale Radical
 
 
 
 
 

[1] S.D. Codified Laws § 13-33-1. 
[2] South Dakota Health Education Standards: A Resource Guide for Achieving Health Literacy (Pierre, SD: South Dakota Department of Education and Cultural Affairs, 2000), accessed 14 April 2010, <http://doe.sd.gov/contentstandards/health/docs/standards.pdf>, 3. 
[3] Ibid., 55. 
[4] S.D. Codified Laws § 13-33-6.1. 
[5] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[6] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[7] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[8] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[10] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[11] Ibid., Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[13] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[14] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[15] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[16] Ibid., Table 16.
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[20]  Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[21] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[22] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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