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Pennsylvania State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Pennsylvania

 
 
Pennsylvania Sexuality Education Law and Policy

Schools in Pennsylvania are not required to teach sexuality education.  Primary, intermediate, middle, and high schools, however, are required to teach sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV education; though primary schools are allowed to omit instruction on the sexual methods of disease transmission.[1]  Schools must use materials that have been determined by the local school district, are age-appropriate, discuss prevention, and stress abstinence as “the only completely reliable means of preventing sexual transmission.”[2]

The state has created the Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education, which includes STD- and HIV-prevention education.  All decisions regarding HIV-prevention curricula and materials must be made by local school districts.  School districts do not have to follow a specific curriculum, but they must use these standards as a framework for the development of their curricula.[3] 
 
School districts must publicize the fact that parents and guardians can review all curriculum materials.  Parents and guardians whose principles or religious beliefs conflict with instruction may excuse their children from the programs.[4]  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See Title 22 Pennsylvania Constitutional Statutes § 4.29, and the Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education (Title 22 Pennsylvania Constitutional Statutes App. D).
 
 
Recent Legislation
Healthy Youth Act Introduced
House Bill 1163, the Healthy Youth Act, was introduced in April 2009. The bill would require public schools to provide age-appropriate, medically accurate, and culturally sensitive, comprehensive sex education. Such instruction would teach the benefits of and reasons for not engaging in sexual intercourse; that not engaging in sex is the only certain way to prevent pregnancy and reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); the health benefits, side effects, safety, and proper use of all FDA-approved contraceptive methods; and information on how STDs are and are not transmitted. School districts would also be required to approve and select curricula appropriate for students in the district. The bill passed the House Education Committee on April 27, 2010, but was then tabled and reassigned to the Appropriations Committee. No further action has been taken.  
 
Notice Home Act Introduced
House Bill 1162, the Notice Home Act, was introduced in April 2009. It would have required school principals to notify parents that their child does not receive instruction on preventing STDs, HIV/AIDS, and pregnancy if that child participates in an abstinence-only-until-marriage program. The notice to parents would have stated that such programs do not provide medically accurate instruction on responsible decision-making regarding sexuality or information on the risks, benefits, or proper use of methods approved by the Food and Drug Administration for reducing the risk of contracting or transmitting STDs, including HIV/AIDS, or pregnancy. HB 1162 was referred to the Education Committee, where it died. 
 
 
Pennsylvania’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[5] 
  • In 2009, 51% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students in Pennsylvania reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in Pennsylvania reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 13% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in Pennsylvania reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 40% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students in Pennsylvania reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 60% of females and 71% of males in Pennsylvania reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 25% of females and 21% of males in Pennsylvania reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 11% of females and 18% of males in Pennsylvania reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 90% of high school students in Pennsylvania reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • In 2009, 59% of female high school students and 69% of male high school students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 6% of female high school students and 24% of male high school students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 17% of female high school students and 35% of male high school students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 45% of female high school students and 48% of male high school students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 53% of females and 74% of males in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 11% of females and 9% of males in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 9% of females and 13% of males in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 84% of high school students in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Pennsylvania Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Pennsylvania’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 40th in the U.S., with a rate of 53 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[6] There were a total of 22,350 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Pennsylvania.[7]
 
  • Pennsylvania’s teen birth rate ranked 41st in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 30.4 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[8] In 2006, there were a total of 12,910 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Pennsylvania.[9]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[10] Pennsylvania’s teen birth rate also increased between 2005 and 2006, from 30.4 to 31 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[11] 
 
  • Pennsylvania’s teen abortion rate ranks 18th in the U.S., with a rate of 15 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 6,208 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Pennsylvania.[12]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Pennsylvania ranks 7th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 1,007 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Pennsylvania. [13]
 
  • Pennsylvania’s AIDS rate ranks 10th in the U.S., with a rate of 14.1 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[14]
 
  • Pennsylvania ranks 6th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 1,750 new AIDS cases reported in Pennsylvania.[15]
 
  • Pennsylvania ranks 8th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. amongyoung people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 19 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Pennsylvania.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Pennsylvania ranks 26th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 18.42 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 16,501 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Pennsylvania.[17] 
 
  • Pennsylvania ranks 23rd in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 3.68 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 3,295 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Pennsylvania.[18] 
 
  • Pennsylvania ranks 23rd in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.02 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 22 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Pennsylvania.[19] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in Pennsylvania public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[20]
 
Revised School District Policy
Pittsburgh Public Schools
On February 24, 2009, the Pittsburgh Public Schools School Board overturned its abstinence-only-until-marriage policy and adopted a new, comprehensive sexuality education policy for grades K–12. The new policy requires schools to teach “sexuality health education” that is comprehensive, age-appropriate, and medically accurate.[21] Instruction must emphasize “abstinence as the expected norm and the only protection that is 100% effective against unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV when transmitted sexually,” and provide a “wholesome and comprehensive understanding of the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibility necessary for successful relationships and family life.”[22] 
 
Under the policy, sex education curriculum must cover six major topic areas: human development, healthy relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, sexual health, and society and culture. Specific instructional content shall discuss, among other information, anatomy, reproduction, body image, gender roles, “orientation and stereotypes,” risk reduction behaviors, decision-making skills, and pregnancy and STD prevention that addresses both abstinence and contraception.[23] Parents have the right to exempt their child from instruction. The policy specifies that any outside presenters must be approved by the Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development. Furthermore, any outside presenter whose services do not align with the guidelines established by the policy will be prohibited from presenting within district schools.[24]    
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Pennsylvania public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health and community-based organizations in Pennsylvania received $4,613,771 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[25]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Pennsylvania received $94,780 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Pennsylvania Department of Health distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to four sub-grantees, including two community-based organizations and two faith-based organizations.
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Pennsylvania, sub-grantees contributed to the match through in-kind services. 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in Pennsylvania received $3,290,991 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are six CBAE grantees in Pennsylvania, including three community-based organizations, one crisis pregnancy center, one faith-based organization, and one university. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There is one AFLA grantee in Pennsylvania, To Our Children’s Future with Health, Inc., which received $700,000 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
 
Congressional Earmarks
  • In Fiscal Year 2009, Pennsylvania received a total of $528,000 in federal earmarks. An earmark is a congressional provision that directs approved funds to be spent on a specific project.
  • There are 22 organizations in Pennsylvania that received earmarks for abstinence-only-until-marriage programming, including eight community-based organizations, four faith-based organizations, three crisis pregnancy centers, three school districts, two hospitals, one local health department, and one university.
  • Senator Arlen Specter (D-PA) was the first Senator to secure earmarks specifically for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs beginning in Fiscal Year 2003. As Senator Specter was the Ranking Member of the Appropriations Subcommittee that oversees funding levels for Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education when appropriations for Fiscal Year 2009 was finalized, he exercised great influence over funds within the bill.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Pennsylvania use commercially available curricula.  These include, but are not limited to: 
  • WAIT Training
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[26]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V/
Federal Earmarks
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Pennsylvania Department of Health
 
 
 
 
$94,780
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
A+ for Abstinence
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Catholic Social Services—
Wilkes–Barre
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
City of Chester, Bureau of Health
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Clinical Outcomes Group, Inc.
 
 
$17,998
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Crozer Chester Medical Center
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Esperanza
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Family Services and
Children’s Aid Society
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Guidance Center
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Keystone Central School District
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Keystone Economic Development Corporation
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
La Salle University
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
$510,089
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Lincoln Intermediate Unit-12
 
 
 
$550,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
My Choice, Inc.
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
 
Neighborhood United Against Drugs
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
 
New Brighton School District
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Pennsylvania Association of
Latino Organizations
 
 
$48,838
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
People for People
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Progressive Believers Ministries
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Rape and Victim Assistance Center of Schuylkill County[27]
 
 
 
$567,138
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
School District of Philadelphia
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Shepherd’s Maternity House, Inc.
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Tender Care Pregnancy Center
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
To Our Children’s Future With Health, Inc.
 
 
 
 
$700,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
True Light Empower Ministries
 
 
 
$4,999
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Tuscarora Intermediate Unit
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Urban Family Council
 
 
$5,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Washington Hospital Teen Outreach
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
Women’s Care Center of
Erie County, Inc.
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
$463,764
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
York County Human Life Services.
 
 
$24,000
 
(federal earmark)
 
 
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[28]
Abigail Coleman
Pennsylvania Department of Health
Bureau of Family Health
7th Floor, East Wing
Health & Welfare Building
625 Forster Street
Harrisburg, PA 17108
Phone: (717) 772-2762 
 
 
Pennsylvania Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Pennsylvania
P.O. Box 40008
Philadelphia, PA 19006
Phone: (215) 592-1513
 
Adagio Health
960 Penn Avenue, Suite 600
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Phone: (800) 942-9467
Attic Youth Center
255 South 16th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Phone: (215) 545-4331
 
Christian Association of U. Penn.
118 South 37th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: (215) 746-6350
 
Family Health Council of Central Pennsylvania
3461 Market Street, Suite 200
Camp Hill, PA 17011
Phone: (717) 761-7380
The Family Planning Council
260 South Broad Street, Suite 1000
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Phone: (215) 985-2600
 
LGBT Center Coalition
221 North Front Street, 3rd Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17101
Phone: (717) 920-9534
National Council of Jewish Women
1620 Murray Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
Phone: (412) 421-6118
 
Pennsylvania Coalition to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
3461 Market Street, Suite 200
Camp Hill, PA 17011
Phone: (717) 761-7380
 
Planned Parenthood Pennsylvania Advocates
1514 North 2nd Street, Suite 400
Harrisburg, PA 17102
Phone: (717) 234-2479
 
Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force
5913 Penn Avenue, 2nd Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15206
Phone: (412) 345-7456
 
 
 
Pennsylvania Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Pennsylvania Family Institute
23 North Front Street
Harrisburg, PA 17101
Phone: (717) 545-0600
www.pafamily.org
Pennsylvanians for Human Life
590 Snyder Avenue
West Chester, PA 19382
Phone: (610) 696-0780
 
Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation
4800 Jonestown Road, Suite 102
Harrisburg, PA 17109
Phone: (717) 541-0034
 
People for Life
1625 West 26th Street
P.O. Box 1126
Erie, PA 16512
Phone: (814) 459-1333
 
 
Newspapers in Pennsylvania[29]
Bucks County Courier Times
Newsroom
8400 Route 13
Levittown, PA 19057
Phone: (215) 949-4000
 
Erie Times-News
Newsroom
205 West 12th Street
Erie, PA 16534
Phone: (814) 870-1600
The Morning Call
Newsroom
101 North 6th Street
Allentown, PA 18101
Phone: (610) 820-6500
 
The Patriot-News
Newsroom
812 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17101
Phone: (717) 255-8100
Philadelphia Daily News
Newsroom
400 North Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Phone: (215) 854-5900
 
Philadelphia Inquirer
Newsroom
400 North Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Phone: (215) 854-5900
Philadelphia Metro
Newsroom
30 South15th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Phone: (215) 717-2600
 
Philadelphia Tribune
Newsroom
520 South16th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19146
Phone: (215) 893-4050
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Newsroom
34 Boulevard of the Allies
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Phone: (412) 263-1100
 
Reading Eagle
Newsroom
345 Penn Street
Reading, PA 19603
Phone: (610) 371-5000
Tribune-Review
Newsroom
503 Martindale Street, 3rd Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15212
Phone: (412) 321-6460
 
 
 
Political Blogs in Pennsylvania
Lake Erie Alliance for Democracy
 
The Lehigh Valley Political Blog
Two Political Junkies
Young Philly Politics
 
 


[1] 022 Pa. Const. Stat. §§ 4.29(a) and (b). 
[2] 022 Pa. Const. Stat. § 4.29(a). 
[3] Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education (Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2002), accessed 14 April 2010, <http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=18&objID=380421&mode=2>.
[4] 022 Pa. Const. Stat. § 4.29(c). 
[5] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: Philadelphia also participated in the 2009 YRBS. 
[6] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[7] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[8] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[10] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[11] Ibid., Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[13] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[14] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[15] Ibid., Table 16.
[16] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[20] This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified.  
[21] School District of Pittsburgh, School Board Policy No. 135, Comprehensive Sexuality Education, adopted 24 February 2009, accessed 5 May 2010, <http://www.pps.k12.pa.us/pps/lib/pps/ComprehensiveSexualityEducation%20_2_.pdf>, 1.
[22] Ibid.
[23] Ibid., 2.
[24] Ibid., 3.
[25] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[26] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009.
[27] Rape and Victim Assistance Center of Schuylkill County closed in 2009, and was taken over by the Sexual Assault Resource and Counseling Center of Schuylkill County. See Ben Wolfgang, “SARCC of Schuylkill County launches new home,” Pottsville Republican, 7 April 2010, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://republicanherald.com/news/sarcc-of-schuylkill-county-launches-new-home-1.721331>.
[28] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[29] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues.  For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education