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Oklahoma State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Oklahoma

 
 
Oklahoma Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Oklahoma does not require schools to teach sexuality education. However, schools are required to provide HIV/AIDS-prevention education. This education must be limited to the “discussion of the disease AIDS and its spread and prevention.”[1]  The class must be taught once during either grade five or six, once during grades seven through nine, and once during grades ten through 12.[2]  All curricula and materials must be checked for medical accuracy by the Oklahoma Department of Health and must only include “factual medical information for AIDS prevention.”[3]
 
HIV/AIDS education must specifically teach that:
 
  • engaging in homosexual activity, promiscuous sexual activity, intravenous drug use or contact with contaminated blood products is now known to be primarily responsible for contact with the AIDS virus;
  • avoiding the activities specified above is the only method of preventing the spread of the virus;artificial means of birth control are not a certain means of preventing the spread of the AIDS virus and reliance on such methods puts a person at risk for exposure to the disease; and
  • sexual intercourse, with or without condoms, with any person testing positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies, or any other person infected with HIV, places that individual in a high risk category for developing AIDS.[4]
 
If a school district does choose to teach sexuality education, all curricula and materials must be approved for medical accuracy by the state and by the district superintendent.[5]  All materials must also be available to parents for review.[6]  In addition, all sexuality education classes must have as one of their primary purposes “the teaching of or informing students about the practice of abstinence.”[7]
 
A school district must provide written notification of all sexuality and HIV/AIDS -prevention classes. Parents or guardians can submit written notification if they do not want their children to participate in such classes.[8]  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

See Oklahoma Statutes 70-11-103.3, 70-11-105.1
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation Mandating Medically Accurate Sex Education
House Bill 1348, introduced in February 2009, and its companion measure, Senate Bill 1381, which was introduced in February 2010, would have amended current statutes to clarify that all sex education curricula must be based on medically accurate and factual information.  Both bills defined medical accuracy and specified that no such program could withhold information necessary to make informed decisions about personal health.  HB 1348 was referred to the House Committee on Common Education and SB1318 was referred to the Senate Committee on Health and Human Resources; both bills died due to inaction.
 
 
Oklahoma’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[9]
  • In 2009, 51% of female high school students and 51% of male high school students in Oklahoma reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 6% of male high school students in Oklahoma reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 15% of female high school students and 20% of male high school students in Oklahoma reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 40% of female high school students and 40% of male high school students in Oklahoma reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 50% of females and 64% of males in Oklahoma reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 22% of females and 23% of males in Oklahoma reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 20% of females and 20% of males in Oklahoma reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 82% of high school students in Oklahoma reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Oklahoma Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Oklahoma’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 14th in the U.S., with a rate of 76 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[10] There were a total of 9,370 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Oklahoma.[11]
 
  • Oklahoma’s teen birth rate ranked 8th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 54.2 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[12]  In 2005, there were a total of 6,685 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Oklahoma.[13]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[14] In contrast, Oklahoma’s teen birth rate increased 10% between 2005 and 2006, from 54.2 to 59.6 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[15] 
 
  • Oklahoma’s teen abortion rate ranks 31st in the U.S., with a rate of 10 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 1,109 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Oklahoma.[16]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Oklahoma ranks 31st in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 172 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Oklahoma. [17]
 
  • Oklahoma ranks 25th in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 7 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Oklahoma.[18]
 
  • Oklahoma’s AIDS rate ranks 24th in the U.S., with a rate of 7.3 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[19]
 
  • Oklahoma ranks 29th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 264 new AIDS cases reported in Oklahoma.[20]
 
  • Oklahoma ranks 35th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there was a total of 1 AIDS case reported among young people ages 13–19 in Oklahoma.[21]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Oklahoma ranks 18th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 21.04 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 5,343 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Oklahoma.[22] 
 
  • Oklahoma ranks 13th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 5.95 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 1,510 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Oklahoma.[23] 
 
  • Oklahoma ranks 23rd in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.02 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 4 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Oklahoma.[24] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Oklahoma public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Oklahoma public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.orgto share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health and community-based organizations in Oklahoma received $1,117,533 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[25]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Oklahoma received $518,006 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Oklahoma State Department of Health distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to 20 sub-grantees, including 17 school districts, one community-based organization, one faith-based organization, and one local health department. 
  • The Department of Health also uses a portion of the federal funds to support a public awareness campaign and television advertisements. 
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Oklahoma, sub-grantees contributed to the match through in-kind services.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • There is one CBAE grantee in Oklahoma, the Pregnancy Resource Center of Southern Oklahoma, which received $599,527 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There are no AFLA grantees in Oklahoma.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Oklahoma use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to: bb:
  • Choosing the Best
  • WAIT Training
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[26]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Oklahoma State Department of Health
 
 
$518,006
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Byng Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Caney Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Canute Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Crescent Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Darlington Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Delaware County Health Department
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Geary Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Latta Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Haworth Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Moss Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Oklahoma Broadcasting Association
 
 
$25,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Oklahoma Family Policy Council
 
 
$125,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Pregnancy Resource Center of Southern Oklahoma
 
 
 
$599,527
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
 
 
Pleasant Grove Public Schools
 
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Ponca City Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Preston Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Sasakwa Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Savanna Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Tipton Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Wright City Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Wynona Public Schools
 
 
$1,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[27]
Teresa Ryan
Adolescent Health Coordinator
Oklahoma State Department of Health
1000 N.E. Tenth Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73117
Phone: (405) 271-4477
 
 
Oklahoma Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
NARAL Pro-Choice Oklahoma
P.O. Box 702503
Tulsa, OK 74170
 
Oklahoma AIDS Care Fund
6608 North Western, #219
Oklahoma City, OK   73116
Phone: (405) 348-6600
Oklahomans for Equality
621 East 4th Street
Tulsa OK
Phone: (918) 743-4297
 
Oklahoma Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
P.O. Box 35194
Tulsa, OK 74153
Phone: (918) 481-6444
 
Planned Parenthood of Arkansas and
Eastern Oklahoma
5780 South Peoria
Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: (918) 587-1101
Planned Parenthood of Central Oklahoma
619 North West 23rd Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73103
Phone: (405) 528-2157
 
 
Oklahoma Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Oklahoma Family Policy Council
3908 North Peniel Avenue
Bethany Bank Tower, Suite 100
Bethany, OK 73008
Phone: (405) 787-7744
Oklahomans for Life
3105 East Skelly Drive, Suite 605
Tulsa, OK 74105
Phone: (918) 749-5022
 
 
Newspapers in Oklahoma[28]
Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise
Newsroom
4125 Nowata Road
Bartlesville, OK 74006
Phone: (918) 335-8200
 
The Daily Ardmoreite
Newsroom
117 West Broadway
Ardmore, OK 73401
Phone: (580) 223-2200
Enid News and Eagle
Newsroom
P. O. Box 1192
Enid, OK 73702
Phone: (800) 299-6397
 
The Lawton Constitution
Newsroom
P.O. Box 2069
Lawton, OK  73502
Phone: (580) 353-0620
Muskogee Daily Phoenix
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1968
Muskogee, OK 74402
Phone: (918) 684-2828
 
News-Capital & Democrat
Newsroom
P.O. Box 987
McAlester, OK 74502
Phone: (918) 423-1700
The Norman Transcript
Newsroom
P.O. Drawer 1058
Norman, OK 73070
Phone: (405) 321-1800
 
The Oklahoman
Newsroom
P.O. Box 25125
Oklahoma City, OK 73125
Phone: (405) 475-3311
Ponca City News
Newsroom
300 North Third Street
Ponca City, OK 74601
Phone: (580) 765-3311
Tulsa World
Newsroom
315 South Boulder Avenue
Tulsa, OK 74103
Phone: (918) 581-8400
 
 
Political Blogs in Oklahoma
Alternative Tulsa
Blue Oklahoma
 
Okie Funk
Oklahoma Women’s Network
 
 


[1] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-103.3(A). 
[2] Ibid.
[3] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-103.3(C). 
[4] Okla. Stat. §S 70-11-103.3(D)–(E). 
[5] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-103.3(B). 
[6] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-103.3(C). 
[7] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-105.1(B). 
[8] Okla. Stat. § 70-11-105.1(B). 
[9] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[10] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[11] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[12] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[13] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.2.
[14] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4..
[15] Ibid., Table B.
[16] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[17] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[18] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[19] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[20] Ibid., Table 16.
[21] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[22] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[23] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[24] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[25] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[26] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[27] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[28] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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