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New York State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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New York

 
 
New York Sexuality Education Law and Policy
In New York, health education is required for all students in kindergarten through 12th grade.  This instruction must provide information about HIV/AIDS.  HIV/AIDS instruction must be taught by teachers who have been given appropriate training and curriculum materials by the board of education or trustees. [1]
 
All HIV/AIDS education must “provide accurate information to pupils concerning the nature of the disease, methods of transmission, and methods of prevention.”[2] This instruction must be age-appropriate and consistent with community values and “shall stress abstinence as the most appropriate and effective premarital protection against AIDS.”[3]
 
Each local school board must establish an advisory council to make recommendations on HIV/AIDS instruction.[4] Local boards of education may provide for the distribution of condoms in schools. They must ensure that all students who have access to the condoms have taken part in an HIV/AIDS education program.[5] 
 
The state does not require or suggest a specific curriculum, but does provide a curriculum framework, the Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences at Three Levels. The framework does not specifically mention sexuality education though certain topics within sexuality education are included, such as “understanding of the changes that accompany puberty.”[6]
 
Parents may exempt their children from HIV/AIDS classes as long as the school is given “assurance that the pupil will receive such instruction at home.”[7] This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.

See New York Regulations of the Commissioner of Education § 135.3, and Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences at Three Levels.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Bill to Establish Sex Education Grant Program
Assembly Bill 1806 and its companion, Senate Bill 3836, which were introduced in January 2009 and carried over from the previous legislative session, would establish a sex education grant program administered by the department of health.  Both public and private entities would be eligible to apply for the grants.  Programs receiving the grants would have to be age-appropriate and medically accurate; provide information on abstinence and contraception; acknowledge the needs of students who already have engaged in sexual activity; and encourage healthy decision-making, self-esteem, and family communication.  The bill empowers the Commissioner of Health, who would administer the grants, to determine topics of instruction and make provisions for grant applications.  The bill passed the Assembly 129–16, but failed to move out of committee in the Senate.  It was returned to the Assembly in January 2010, but no further action has been taken.
 
Legislation Mandates Comprehensive Sex Education
Senate Bill 1295, introduced in January 2009, and its companion measure, Assembly Bill 10966, would direct the Commissioner of Education to create and implement an age-appropriate, medically accurate, comprehensive sex education program for students in grades one through 12. Local boards of education would be empowered to institute different curricula, provided that the curricula did not substantially deviate from that created by the Commissioner. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Education. No further action has been taken. 
 
 
New York’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[8]
  • In 2009, 38% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students in New York reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in New York reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 8% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in New York reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 30% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students in New York reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 68% of females and 68% of males in New York reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 19% of females and 15% of males in New York reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 18% of females and 27% of males in New York reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
New York, New York
  • In 2009, 35% of female high school students and 45% of male high school students in New York City reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 14% of male high school students in New York City reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 9% of female high school students and 22% of male high school students in New York City reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 25% of female high school students and 30% of male high school students in New York City reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 65% of females and 77% of males in New York City reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 7% of females and 7% of males in New York City reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 15% of females and 23% of males in New York City reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
 
New York Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • New York’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 12th in the U.S., with a rate of 77 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[9] There were a total of 49,840 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in New York.[10]
 
  • New York’s teen birth rate ranked 44th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 26.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[11] In 2005, there were a total of 17,068 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in New York.[12]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[13] New York’s teen birth rate also decreased 3% between 2005 and 2006, from 26.5 to 25.7 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[14] 
 
  • New York’s teen abortion rate ranks 1st in the U.S., with a rate of 31 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 22,599 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in New York.[15]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • New York ranks 2nd in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 2,836 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in New York. [16]
 
  • New York ranks 1st in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 264 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in New York.[17]
 
  • New York’s AIDS rate ranks 2nd in the U.S., with a rate of 24.9 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[18]
 
  • New York ranks 2nd in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 4,810 new AIDS cases reported in New York .[19]
 
  • New York ranks 1st in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 109 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in New York.[20]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • New York ranks 16th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 21.34 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 29,803 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in New York.[21] 
 
  • New York ranks 26th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 3.33 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 4,648 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in New York.[22] 
 
  • New York ranks 11th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.05 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 72 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in New York.[23] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in New York public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[24]
 
Comprehensive Sex Education Programs in Public Schools
New York City Department of Education Sex Education Pilot Program
In 2007, the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) implemented a pilot sex education program in ten public schools in the South Bronx. Five middle schools and five high schools elected to take part in the pilot program; a total of seven schools were able to complete the program. NYCDOE chose the South Bronx due to the community’s high rates of teen sexual activity and teen pregnancy.[25] The program used the evidenced-based curriculum, Reducing the Risk, as well as three lessons from the “Abstinence and Sexual Health” component of the HealthSmart curriculum for high school students. Middle school students received the middle school HealthSmart curriculum. Additional information was also provided on relationship violence, risky behaviors, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) issues.[26] District teachers administered both curricula. “Forty unique classrooms” took part in the pilot program and 24 lessons were included in both the middle school and high school curriculum.[27]
 
Reducing the Risk: Building Skills to Prevent Pregnancy, STD and HIV is a comprehensive sexuality education curriculum designed for high school students in the ninth and tenth grades that is appropriate for use with multi-ethnic populations.[28] The curriculum includes experiential activities that teach students to develop refusal, negotiation, and communication skills. An evaluation of the program published in Family Planning Perspectives found that it increased parent-child communication, especially among Latino youth, delayed the initiation of sexual intercourse, and reduced incidence of unprotected sex among lower-risk youth.[29]
 
HealthSmart is a comprehensive health education curriculum. There are two versions of the curriculum, one for middle school and one for high school. The middle school curriculum addresses four areas of health education, including “Personal and Family Health,” “Safety and Injury Protection,” “Nutrition and Physical Activity,” and “Tobacco, Alcohol, and Other Drug Prevention.” The “Personal and Family Health” unit teaches students information to “identify and seek help for troublesome feelings,” prevent bullying, resolve conflicts, “develop respect for their bodies,” and “practice behaviors that prevent the spread of diseases.”[30]
 
A process evaluation of the pilot program was conducted among school principals and teachers who administered the program. The evaluation revealed a lack of basic knowledge among students about human sexuality. Teachers reported that students who participated in the program possessed little to no knowledge of reproductive anatomy. Findings also show that students were eager to receive information.[31] In fact, teachers reported that in most cases they needed more time than one class period per lesson due to students’ engagement in the information and desire to ask questions and participate in class discussion. Additional findings show support among parents. The evaluation revealed that very few parents (zero to three per school) chose to opt their child out of the program. Those who did, chose to do so due to religious reasons. In addition, schools received little resistance from parents; and three out of the six principals who participated in the program evaluation reported strong parental support for the program.[32] 
 
Findings also reveal that the pilot program made a positive impact on the school environment overall. Four out of the six principals participating in the survey stated that the pilot helped with school attendance, improved grades, and reduced the number of disciplinary incidents. Five out of the six principals reported that the program helped in “fostering school pride and connectedness.”[33] No principals reported that the program had any negative affect on academic goals and priorities. 
 
Moreover, all of the principals stated that “they would use the curricula again and recommend them to other principals.”[34] And, among the teachers participating in the survey, all of the teachers “reported that they thought teaching sex education in school was important” and the majority thought that sex education should be mandated.[35]
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in New York public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
Community-based organizations in New York received $4,485,091 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[36]
  
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • New York chose not to participate in the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program in Fiscal Year 2009. The state was eligible for approximately $3,676,827 in funding. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state would have received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in New York received $2,760,093 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are six CBAE grantees in New York, including four faith-based organizations, one community-based organization, and one crisis pregnancy center. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • Organizations in New York received $1,724,998 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are four AFLA grantees in New York, including three community-based organizations and one hospital. 
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in New York use commercially available curricula.  These include, but are not limited to: 
  • A.C. Green’s Game Plan
  • WAIT Training
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[37]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Adolescent & Family Comprehensive Services, Inc. 
 
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Be’er Hagolah Institutes
 
 
 
$290,398
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
Boys and Girls Clubs of
the Northtowns
 
 
 
$512,500
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Catholic Charities of Buffalo (ProjecTruth)
 
 
 
$599,800
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
 
Catholic Charities of
Oneida/Madison County
 
 
 
$458,516
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Catholic Charities of
Onondaga County
 
 
 
 
$474,998
 
(2007–2012)
 
Mother and Unborn Baby Care
of Long Island, Inc. (d.b.a. Life
Center of Long Island)
 
 
 
$598,879
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
Niagara County
 
 
 
$300,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial Hospital, Inc.
 
 
 
 
$300,000
 
(2004–2009)
 
Project REACH
 
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[38]
Kristine Mesler
New York State Department of Health
State Adolescent Health Coordinator
Bureau of Child and Adolescent Health
Empire State Plaza
Corning Tower, Room 208
Albany, NY 12237
Phone: (518) 473-4656
 
 
New York Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Anti-Violence Project
240 West 35th Street, Suite 200
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 714-1184
Empire State Pride Agenda
16 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10010
Phone: (212) 627-0305
 
Family Planning Advocates of
New York State
17 Elk Street
Albany, NY 12207
Phone: (518) 436-8408
 
GMHC
119 West 24th Street
New York, NY 10011
Phone: 212.367.1000
 
Harlem United Community AIDS Center
306 Lenox Avenue, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10027
Phone: (212) 803-2850
New York AIDS Coalition
400 Broadway, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10013
(646) 744-1598
 
New York Civil Liberties Union
125 Broad Street
New York, NY 10004
Phone: (212) 607-3300
 
New York State United Teachers
800 Troy-Schenectady Road
Latham, NY 12110
Phone: (518) 213-6000
 
Planned Parenthood of New York City
26 Bleecker Street
New York, NY 10012
Phone: (212) 274-7200
Youth Organizers United
105 Washington Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10006
Phone: (212) 608-6365
 
 
 
New York Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Conservative Party of New York
486 78th Street
Ft. Hamilton Station, NY 11209
Phone: (718) 921-2158
 
New Yorkers for Constitutional Freedom
P.O. Box 107
Spencerport, NY 14559
Phone: (585) 225-2340
www.nycf.info
 
New York State Catholic Conference
465 State Street
Albany, NY 12203
Phone: (518) 434-6195
New York State Right to Life Committee
41 State Street, Suite 100M
Albany, NY 12207
Phone: (518) 434-1293
 
 
Newspapers in New York[39]
The Buffalo News
Newsroom
P.O. Box 100
Buffalo, NY 14240
Phone: (716) 849-3434
 
Daily News
Newsroom
450 West 33rd Street
New York, NY 10001
Phone: (212) 210-2100
Hudson Valley Press
Newsroom
P.O. Box 2160
Newburgh, NY 12550
Phone: (845) 562-1313
 
New York Post
Newsroom
1211 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10036
Phone: (212) 930-8000
The New York Times
Newsroom
620 Eighth Avenue
New York, NY 10018
Phone: (888) 698-6397
 
Newsday
Newsroom
235 Pinelawn Road
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: (212) 251-6600
The Post-Standard
Newsroom
P.O. Box 4915
Syracuse, NY 13221
Phone: (315) 470-0011
 
Press & Sun-Bulletin
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1270
Binghamton, NY 13902
Phone: (607) 352-2645
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
Newsroom
55 Exchange Boulevard
Rochester, NY 14614
Phone: (585) 258-2220
 
Staten Island Advance
Newsroom
950 Fingerboard Road
Staten Island, NY 10305
Phone: (718) 981-1234
Times Herald Record
Newsroom
40 Mulberry Street
Middletown, NY 10940
Phone: (845) 343-7008
 
Times Union
Newsroom
P.O. Box 15000
Albany, NY 12212
Phone: (518) 454-5420
The Village Voice
Newsroom
36 Cooper Square
New York, NY 10003
Phone: (212) 475-3333
The Wall Street Journal
Newsroom
200 Liberty Street
New York, NY 10281
Phone: (212) 416-2000
 
 
Political Blogs in New York
The Albany Project
The Community Alliance Blog
 
Lost in the Ozone
 
Next Left Notes
 
Politics on the Hudson
Rochester Turning
 
 


[1] N.Y. Regs. of the Comr. Of Ed. §§ 135.3(b)(2) and (c)(2)(i). 
[2] Ibid. 
[3] Ibid. 
[4] Ibid. 
[5] N.Y. Regs. of the Comr. Of Ed. § 135.3(c)(2)(ii). 
[6] Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences at Three Levels (New York: New York State Department of Education), accessed 14 April 2010, <http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/pe/pub/hpefcle.pdf>, 4. 
[7] N.Y. Regs. of the Comr. Of Ed. §§ 135.3(b)(2) and (c)(2)(i). 
[8] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: New York City also participated in the 2009 YRBS.
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[10] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[11] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[13] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[14] Ibid., Table B.
[15] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[16] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[17] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[18] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park. CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[19] Ibid., Table 16.
[20] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[21] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,”(Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[22] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[23] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[24] This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified.
[25] Philip M. Alberti, et. al, “NYC Sex Education Pilot Program: Process Evaluation Results,” New York City Department of Education, accessed 15 June 2010, <http://www.nyclu.org/files/releases/Bronx_pilot_evaluation_05.27.10.pdf>, 3.
[26] Ibid, 6.
[27] Ibid, 12.
[28] Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008), accessed 30 March 2010, <http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/sciencesuccess.pdf>, 22.
[29] Ibid., 23–24.
[30] “Health Smart Curriculum,” West Middle Island School, accessed 23 May 2010, <http://www.longwood.k12.ny.us/wmi/health_smart.html>.
[31] Philip M. Alberti, et. al, “NYC Sex Education Pilot Program: Process Evaluation Results,” 13.
[32] Ibid, 18.
[33] Ibid.
[34] “Advocates Urge NYC Dept of Education to Expand Successful Sex Ed Program,” Press Release, American Civil Liberties Union, 27 May 2010, accessed 15 June 2010, <http://www.aclu.org/reproductive-freedom/advocates-urge-nyc-dept-education-expand-successful-sex-ed-program>.
[35] Ibid.
[36] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[37] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009.
[38] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[39] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

 

National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education