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Nebraska State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Nebraska

 
 
Nebraska Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Nebraska law does not require sexuality education, nor does it limit or prescribe what can be taught in such classes, or recommend a specific curriculum.  However, in its Nebraska Health Education Frameworks, the Nebraska State Board of Education supports “an abstinence approach to risk behaviors associated with…sexual activity,” and declares that all “state monies shall be dedicated to abstinence programs.”[1] The state board of education also adopted specific abstinence guidelines to be used in any school unit involving family life or sexuality education.  The guidelines include teaching that “abstinence from sexual activity outside marriage is the expected standard for all school-age children,” and “a mutually faithful monogamous relationship in the context of marriage is the expected standard of human sexual activity.”[2]  The guidelines also note that the best way to develop family life or sexuality education units is for parents, school boards, and teachers to work together with schools, districts, and communities “so all have a voice in the process and content.”[3]
 
Nebraska state law does not require parental permission for students to participate in sexuality or HIV/AIDS education nor does it say whether parents or guardians may remove their children from such classes; however, the board of education does recommend that school districts “inform parents of intended activities and permit parents to have their children excluded from the activities.”[4]

See Nebraska Revised Statutes Chapter 79, and Nebraska Health Education Frameworks.
 
 
Recent Legislation
SIECUS is not aware of any recent legislation regarding sexuality education in Nebraska.
 
 
Nebraska’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[5]
  • In 2005, 41% of female high school students and 41% of male high school students in Nebraska reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 48% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, 3% of female high school students and 6% of male high school students in Nebraska reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, 12% of female high school students and 12% of male high school students in Nebraska reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 17% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, 30% of female high school students and 30% of male high school students in Nebraska reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 35% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 56% of females and 67% of males in Nebraska reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 56% of females and 70% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 25% of females and 19% of males in Nebraska reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 21% of females and 15% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 23% of females and 26% of males in Nebraska reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2005, 85% of high school students in Nebraska reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 88% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Nebraska Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Nebraska’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 43rd in the U.S., with a rate of 50 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[6] There were a total of 3,120 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Nebraska.[7]
 
  • Nebraska’s teen birth rate ranked 33rd in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 34.2 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[8] In 2005, there were a total of 2,147 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Nebraska.[9]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[10] Nebraska’s teen birth rate decreased between 2005 and 2006, from 34.2 to 33.4 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[11] 
 
  • Nebraska’s teen abortion rate ranks 42nd in the U.S., with a rate of 8 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 448 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Nebraska.[12]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Nebraska ranks 39th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 52 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Nebraska. [13]
 
  • Nebraska ranks 25th in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 7 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Nebraska.[14]
 
  • Nebraska’s AIDS rate ranks 38th in the U.S., with a rate of 4.5 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[15]
 
  • Nebraska ranks 37th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 80 new AIDS cases reported in Nebraska.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Nebraska ranks 37th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 14.51 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 1,888 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Nebraska.[17] 
 
  • Nebraska ranks 24th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 3.64 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 474 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Nebraska.[18] 
 
  • There are no available statewide data on the rate of syphilis among young people.
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
 SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Nebraska public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Nebraska public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health and Human Services and community-based organizations in Nebraska received $1,879,375 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[19]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Nebraska received $164,055 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to ten sub-grantees, including three community-based organizations, two crisis pregnancy centers, two local health departments, one health center, one high school, and one school district. 
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Nebraska, sub-grantees contributed to the match through in-kind services. 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Public and private entities in Nebraska received $1,415,320 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are three CBAE grantees in Nebraska, including one community-based organization, one faith-based organization, and one Native American tribe. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There is one AFLA grantee in Nebraska, Father Flanagan’s Boys Home, which received $300,000 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Nebraska use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to: 
  • WAIT Training
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[20]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
 
 
$164,055
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Alliance Area YMCA
 
$3,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Bishop Neumann High School
 
 
$2,075
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Charles Drew Health Center
 
 
$3,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
City of Norfolk/Community Character Development Coalition
 
 
 
$469,860
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Essential Pregnancy Services
 
 
$1,165
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home
 
 
 
$550,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
$300,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Four Corners Public Health Department
 
 
$3,245
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Hastings AAA Crisis Pregnancy Center
 
$3,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Nebraska Children’s Home Society
 
 
 
$3,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
North Central District Health
Department
 
$3,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Saint Elizabeth Foundation
 
 
$3,245
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Wahoo Public Schools
 
 
$2,075
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
 
 
 
$395,460
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[21]
Linda Henningsen
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
P.O. Box 95044
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-0538
 
 
Nebraska Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Nebraska
941 O Street, Suite 706
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 476-8091
 
Nebraska AIDS Project
250 South 77th Street, Suite A
Omaha, NE 68114
Phone: (402) 552-9260
 
Nebraska Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
P.O. Box 31395
Omaha, NE 68131
Phone: (402) 320-0070
 
Planned Parenthood of the Heartland
4610 S. 133rd Street, Suite 101
Omaha, NE 68137
Phone: (402) 554-1054
Stop AIDS Nebraska
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
 
 
 
Nebraska Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Family First
610 J Street, Suite 10
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 435-3210
Nebraska Right to Life Committee
P.O. Box 80410
Lincoln, NE 68501
Phone: (402) 438-4802
 
 
Newspapers in Nebraska[22]
Columbus Telegram
Newsroom
1254 27th Avenue
Columbus, NE 68601
Phone: (402) 564-2741
 
Hastings Tribune
Newsroom
912 West 2nd Street
Hastings, NE 68901
Phone: (402) 462-2131
Lincoln Journal Star
Newsroom
926 P Street
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 473-7150
 
North Platte Telegraph
Newsroom
P.O. Box 370
North Platte, NE 69101
Phone: (308) 532-6000
Omaha World-Herald
Newsroom
Omaha World-Herald Building
Omaha, NE 68102
Phone: (402) 444-1000
 
 
 
Political Blogs in Nebraska
Blog for Rural America
Daily Kos
 
New Nebraska Network
Service Employees International Union
 
 


[1] Nebraska Health Education Frameworks (Lincoln, NE; Nebraska Department of Education, 1998), accessed 13 April 2010, <http://www.nde.state.ne.us/health/framework.pdf>, 1.
[2] Ibid., 16.
[3] Ibid.
[4] Ibid., 1. 
[5] Danice K. Eaton, et al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2005,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 55, no. SS-5 (9 June 2006): 1-108, accessed 26 January 2007, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>. Note: Nebraska did not participate in the 2007 or the 2009 YRBS. 
[6] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[7] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[8] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[10] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[11] Ibid., Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[13] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[14] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[15] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[16] Ibid., Table 16.
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[20] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[21] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[22] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues.  For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

 

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