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Missouri State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Missouri

 
 
Missouri Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Missouri schools are required to teach health education, including HIV/AIDS-prevention education, beginning in elementary school.[1] If a school chooses to provide additional sexuality education, Missouri law mandates that all instruction must be medically and factually accurate and “present abstinence from sexual activity as the preferred choice of behavior in relation to all sexual activity for unmarried pupils.”[2] In addition, instruction must “advise students that teenage sexual activity places them at a higher risk of dropping out of school because of the consequences of sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancy.”[3] 
Among other requirements, the instruction must also:
 
  • provide students with the latest medical information regarding exposure to HIV/AIDS, human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis, and other STDs;
  • present the latest medically factual information regarding both the possible side effects and health benefits of all forms of contraception, including their success and failure rates in preventing pregnancy and STDs, or present information on contraceptives in a manner consistent with the provisions of the federal abstinence education law; and
  • include a discussion of the possible emotional and psychological consequences of preadolescent and adolescent sexual activity and the consequences of adolescent pregnancy.
 
The specific content of human sexuality instruction must be determined by the school board of a school district or charter school.[4]  School districts and charter schools are prohibited from providing abortion services and from allowing a person and/or entity that provides abortion services to “offer, sponsor, or furnish” course materials related to human sexuality and STDs.[5]
 
Prior to instruction, school districts and charter schools must make all curriculum materials available for public inspection.[6] Parents have the right to remove their child from any part of the district’s or school’s human sexuality instruction.[7] This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See Missouri Revised Statutes § 170.015 and Missouri School Improvement Program Integrated Standards and Indicators Manual: Accreditation Standards for Public Schools in Missouri.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Prevention First Act Introduced
Senate Bill 329, the Prevention First Act, was introduced in February 2009 and would have mandated that all sex education be medically and factually accurate and based on projects that have been shown to influence healthy behavior. Specifically, the bill stated that all sex education should stress abstinence as the only sure way to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases; discuss the latest medical information on STDs; present factual information about condoms and contraceptives, including success and failure rates; provide information about the human papillomavirus vaccine; encourage family communication about sexuality; and teach skills for making responsible decisions, managing conflict, respecting one’s self and others, and resisting peer pressure.  SB 329 was referred to the Education Committee, where it died. The Prevention First Act was reintroduced as Senate Bill 982 in February 2010; it and a similar measure, Senate Bill 696, which was introduced in January 2010, also died in committee. 
 
Act to Modify Sexuality Education
Senate Bill 316, introduced in February 2009, would have modified provisions on human sexuality and sexually transmitted disease education courses for school districts that choose to teach such courses.  The act would have removed references in the sexual education statute allowing information to be provided on the federal abstinence education law, and required instruction on the dangers of sexual predators, including online predators.  Students would have also been taught how to behave responsibly on the internet and how to report inappropriate behavior to a responsible adult.  Prior to any human sexuality instruction, parents would have had to be notified regarding the CyberTipline and the sexual offender registry. Finally, the act would have repealed the provisions prohibiting abortion providers from providing sexual education in school and schools from providing abortion services.  The bill died in committee.
 
 
Missouri’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[8]
  • In 2009, 47% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students in Missouri reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in Missouri reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 14% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in Missouri reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 36% of female high school students and 35% of male high school students in Missouri reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 51% of females and 69% of males in Missouri reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 27% of females and 22% of males in Missouri reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 19% of females and 27% of males in Missouri reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 90% of high school students in Missouri reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Missouri Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Missouri’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 26th in the U.S., with a rate of 63 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[9] There were a total of 12,840 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Missouri.[10]
 
  • Missouri’s teen birth rate ranked 21st in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 42.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[11] In 2005, there were a total of 8,611 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Missouri.[12]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[13] In contrast, Missouri’s teen birth rate increased 8% between 2005 and 2006, from 42.5 to 45.7 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[14] 
 
  • Missouri’s teen abortion rate ranks 42nd in the U.S., with a rate of 6 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 1,288 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Missouri.[15]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Missouri ranks 21st in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 353 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Missouri. [16]
 
  • Missouri ranks 12th in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 50 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Missouri.[17]
 
  • Missouri’s AIDS rate ranks 20th in the U.S., with a rate of 9.2 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[18]
 
  • Missouri ranks 20th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 542 new AIDS cases reported in Missouri.[19]
 
  • Missouri ranks 13th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 11 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Missouri.[20]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Missouri ranks 12th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 22.61 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 9,364 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Missouri.[21] 
 
  • Missouri ranks 15th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 5.73 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 2,375 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Missouri.[22] 
 
  • Missouri ranks 16th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.03 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 14 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Missouri.[23] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Missouri public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Missouri public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health and Senior Services and community-based organizations in Missouri received $2,906,569 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[24]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Missouri received $644,514 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to nine sub-grantees, including three crisis pregnancy centers, two health centers, one community-based organization, one county health department, one faith-based organization, and one school district. 
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Missouri, sub-grantees contributed to the match through a combination of direct revenue and in-kind services.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in Missouri received $2,262,055 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are four CBAE grantees in Missouri, including two community-based organizations and two faith-based organizations.  
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There are no AFLA grantees in Missouri.
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Missouri use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to: 
  • Choosing the Best
  • Sex Can Wait
  • WAIT Training 
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[25]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Missouri Department of Health
and Senior Services
 
 
$644,514
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
About Our Kids, Inc.
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Better Family Life, Inc.
 
 
 
$599,800
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Clay County Public Health Center
 
 
$81,713
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
The Community Abstinence
Program, Inc..
 
 
$95,913
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Kansas City, Missouri School District
 
 
$64,991
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Laclede County
Pregnancy Resource Center
 
 
$62,812
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
LifeChoices Medical Clinic &
Resource Center
 
 
$125,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Lutheran Family and
Children’s Services
 
 
 
$32,669
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
People’s Health Centers
 
 
$116,779
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Pregnancy Care Center
 
 
$104,999
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Saint Louis County
Department of Health
 
 
$82,066
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
ThriVe St. Louis
Pregnancy Resources Center
 
 
 
$549,755
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City/LifeGuard Youth Development
 
 
 
$512,500
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[26]
Patti Van Tuinen
Adolescent Health Coordinator
Bureau of Genetics and Healthy Childhood, Section of Healthy Families and Youth Division of Community and Public Health
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
930 Wildwood Drive
Jefferson City, MO 65109
Phone: (573) 751-6188
 
 
Missouri Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Eastern Missouri
454 Whittier Street
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 652-3111
 
ACLU of Kansas and Western Missouri
3601 Main Street
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: (816) 756-3113
 
Faith Aloud
462 North Taylor, Ste. 102
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 531-5010
 
Kansas City Passages Youth Center
P.O. Box 10083
Kansas City, MO 64171
Phone: (816) 931-0334
 
The Lesbian and Gay Community Center
207 Westport Road, Suite 218
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: (816) 931-4420
 
NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri
1210 South Vandeventer
St. Louis, MO 63110
Phone: (314) 531-8616
 
Planned Parenthood of Kansas and
Mid-Missouri
4401 West 109th Street, Suite 200
Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: (913) 312-5100
 
Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region
4251 Forest Park Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 531-7526
 
Personal Rights of Missourians (PROMO)
438 North Skinker Boulevard
Saint Louis, MO 63130
Phone: (314) 862-4900
 
 
 
Missouri Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Life’s Silver Linings
3298 Huckleberry Drive
Florissant, MO 63033
Phone: (314) 830-1034
 
Missouri Eagle Forum
41 Glen Eagles Drive
St. Louis, MO  63124
Phone: (314) 983-0680
 
Missouri Right to Life
P.O. Box 651
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 635-5110
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City
815 North Noland Road, Suites 4 & 5
Independence, MO 64050
Phone: (816) 836-9000
Newspapers in Missouri[27]
Branson Daily News
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1900
Branson, MO 65615
Phone: (417) 334-3161
 
Columbia Daily Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 798
Columbia, MO 65205
Phone: (573) 815-1700
 
Daily American Republic
Newsroom
208 Poplar Street
Poplar Bluff, MO 63901
Phone: (573) 785-1414
www.darnews.com
 
Jefferson City Post-Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 420
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 636-3131
 
The Joplin Globe
Newsroom
P.O. Box 7
Joplin, MO 64802
Phone: (417) 623-3480
The Kansas City Star
Newsroom
1729 Grand Boulevard
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: (816) 234-4741
 
The News-Leader
Newsroom
651 Boonville Avenue
Springfield, MO 65806
Phone: (417) 836-1100
St. Joseph News-Press
Newsroom
825 Edmond Street
St. Joseph, MO 64501
Phone: (816) 271-8500
 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Newsroom
900 North Tucker Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63101
Phone: (314) 340-8000
Southeast Missourian
Newsroom
P.O. Box 699
Cape Girardeau, MO 63702
Phone: (573) 335-6611
 
 
Political Blogs in Missouri
Blue Gal in a Red State
 
Democracy for Missouri
 
Fired Up Missouri!
 
Pamela Merritt
 
Show Me Progress
The Turner Report
 
 
 
 


[1] Missouri School Improvement Program Integrated Standards and Indicators Manual: Accreditation Standards for Public School Districts in Missouri (Missouri: Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2001), accessed 13 April 2010, <http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/sia/msip/standardsandindicators.pdf>.
[2] Mo. Rev. Stat. § 170.015(1)(1), <http://www.moga.mo.gov/statutes/C100-199/1700000015.HTM>.
[3] Ibid.
[4] Mo. Rev. Stat. § 170.015(6)(4),
[5] Mo. Rev. Stat. § 170.015(7). 
[6] Mo. Rev. Stat. § 170.015(6)(6).
[7] Mo. Rev. Stat. § 170.015(6)(5)(2).
[8] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. 
[9] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[10] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[11] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[12] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity , Table 3.2.
[13] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[14] Ibid., Table B.
[15] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5. 
[16] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[17] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[18] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[19] Ibid., Table 16.
[20] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[21] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[22] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[23] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[24] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[25] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[26] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[27] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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