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Michigan State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Michigan

 
 
Michigan Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Michigan state law does not require schools to teach sexuality education; however, HIV/AIDS education is required. Schools may also offer sexuality education instruction, which may include information on family planning, family life education, and STD-prevention.  HIV and sexuality education must present abstinence as “a responsible method of preventing unwanted or out-of-wedlock pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease” and as “a positive lifestyle for unmarried young people.”[1] Sexuality education classes must be offered as an elective and may not be required for graduation.
 
HIV/AIDS classes may be taught by health care professionals or teachers specifically trained in HIV/AIDS education, and sexuality education instruction must be provided by teachers qualified to teach health education. All instruction in reproductive health must be taught by qualified instructors and “supervised by a registered physician, a registered nurse, or other person certified by the state board as qualified.”[2] Abortion “shall not be considered a method of family planning, nor shall abortion be taught as a method of reproductive health.”[3] Further, no school official or school board member may dispense any family planning drug or device in school, nor may they make abortion referrals.  Districts found in violation of this may face corrective actions, such as being forced to forfeit aid.
 
School boards must establish an advisory board to review all sexuality education materials and curricula. This advisory board must include parents, students, educators, clergy, and health professionals. Each school district must also appoint a sexuality education program supervisor; this person must be approved by the state. All curricula must be approved by the local school board, and, if any changes are made, the local school board must hold at least two public hearings on the revisions.
Most Michigan public schools also follow guidelines from the Michigan Model for Health, formerly the Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education, which promotes nationally recognized and research-based curricula, including curricula on HIV/AIDS prevention. In addition, the Michigan Board of Education has adopted the Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy which states that sexuality education programs must be age-appropriate, developmentally and culturally appropriate, medically accurate, and based on effective programming.
 
Parents must receive notification of any sexuality education class and be allowed to review its content; and may remove their children from any part of the sexuality education instruction.  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See Michigan Compiled Laws §§ 380.1169–.1170, 380.1506–.1507, and 388.1766–.1766a; Michigan Model for Health, and Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy.
   
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Require Sexuality Education
House Bill 5163 and Senate Bill 663, introduced in June 2009, would have required schools to offer age-appropriate, medically accurate, and objective sexuality education instruction, and made such instruction necessary for a student to graduate high school. While abstinence would have been presented as a positive lifestyle choice, the bills specified that sexuality education must also address the need of sexually active students to have information to make healthy decisions.  HB 5163 passed the house on March 24, 2010. No action has been taken on SB 663 as of this writing.   
   
 
Michigan’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[4]
  • In 2009, 44% of female high school students and 47% of male high school students in Michigan reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 7% of male high school students in Michigan reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 12% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students in Michigan reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students in Michigan reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 55% of   females and 68% of males in Michigan reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 21% of females and 23% males in Michigan reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 21% of females and 29% of males in Michigan reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 89% of high school students in Michigan reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
  
 
Detroit, Michigan
  • In 2009, 52% of female high school students and 72% of male high school students in Detroit, Michigan reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 26% of male high school students in Detroit, Michigan reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 14% of female high school students and 35% of male high school students in Detroit, Michigan reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 40% of female high school students and 54% of male high school students in Detroit, Michigan reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 57% of females and 78% of males in Detroit, Michigan reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 10% of females and 5% of males in Detroit, Michigan reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 10% of females and 17% of males in Detroit, Michigan reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 81% of high school students in Detroit, Michigan reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
   
 
Michigan Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Michigan’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 33rd in the U.S., with a rate of 60 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[5] There were a total of 21,940 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Michigan.[6]
 
  • Michigan’s teen birth rate ranked 37th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 32.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[7] In 2006, there were a total of 11,809 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Michigan.[8]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[9] In contrast, Michigan’s teen birth rate increased 4% between 2005 and 2006, from 32.5 to 33.8 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[10] 
 
  • Michigan’s teen abortion rate ranks 26th in the U.S., with a rate of 12 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 4,547 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Michigan.[11]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Michigan ranks 14th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 498 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Michigan. [12]
 
  • Michigan ranks 6th in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 80 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Michigan.[13]
 
  • Michigan’s AIDS rate ranks 30th in the U.S., with a rate of 6.2 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[14]
 
  • Michigan ranks 17th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 628 new AIDS cases reported in Michigan.[15]
 
  • Michigan ranks 9th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 16 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Michigan.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Michigan ranks 7th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 25.3 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 18,926 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Michigan.[17] 
 
  • Michigan ranks 6th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 7.8 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 5,831 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Michigan.[18] 
 
  • Michigan ranks 16th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.03 per cases 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 21 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Michigan.[19] 
   
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Michigan public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Michigan public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
   
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Community Health and community-based organizations in Michigan received $2,540,185 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[20]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
Michigan received $1,063,359 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
The Michigan Department of Community Health distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to eight sub-grantees, including three local health departments, two faith-based organizations, one community-based organization, one healthcare organization, and one school district. 
The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
In Michigan, sub-grantees contributed to the match through direct revenue.
The Department of Community Health  also uses in-kind funding to support a statewide media campaign and health promotional materials that promote abstinence.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in Michigan received $1,200,000 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are two CBAE grantees in Michigan, including one community-based organization and one faith-based organization, which operates a crisis pregnancy center. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There is one AFLA grantee in Michigan, the Ingham County Health Department, which received $276,826 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
   
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Michigan use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to: 
  • A.C. Green’s Game Plan
  • ASPIRE: Live your life. Be free.
  • Choosing the Best
  • Navigator
  • Sex Can Wait
  • WAIT Training
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
   
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[21]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Michigan Department of
Community Health
 
 
$1,063,359
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bethany Christian Services
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
Catholic Charities of West Michigan
 
 
$99,998
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
District Health Department #2
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
District Health Department #4
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Ingham County Health Department
 
 
 
 
$276,826
 
(2004–2009)
 
Jackson County Health Department
 
 
$75,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
South Side Community Coalition
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
St. John Community Health Investment Corp.
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Tuscola Intermediate
School District
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Wedgwood Christian Services
 
 
$100,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
YMCA of Metropolitan Detroit
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
   
 
Adolescent Health Contact[22]
Carrie Tarry
Adolescent and School Health Manager
Division of Family and Community Health
Michigan Department of Community Health
109 West Michigan Avenue, 4th Floor
Lansing, MI 48913
Phone: (517) 335-8906
   
 
Michigan Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan
2966 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, MI 48201
Phone: (313) 578-6800
 
AIDS Partnership Michigan
2751 East Jefferson, Suite 301
Detroit, MI 48207
Phone: (800) 515-3434
The LGC Network of Western Michigan
345 Atlas Avenue SE
Grand Rapids, MI  49506
Phone: (616) 458-3511
 
 Michigan AIDS Coalition
429 Livernois
Ferndale, MI 48220
Phone: (248) 545-1435
Michigan National Organization for Women
P.O. Box 860
East Lansing, MI 48826
Phone: (517) 485-9687
Michigan Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
P.O. Box 739
East Lansing, MI 48823
Planned Parenthood Affiliates of Michigan
P.O. Box 19104
Lansing, MI 48901
Phone: (517) 482-1080
Triangle Foundation
19641 West Seven Mile Road
Detroit, MI 48219
Phone: (313) 537-3323
   
 
Michigan Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Michigan Family Forum
P.O. Box 15216
Lansing, MI 48901
Phone: (517) 374-1171
Michigan Association for Sexual Health
P.O. Box 80224
Lansing, MI 48908
Right to Life of Michigan
2340 Porter Street SW
P.O. Box 901
Grand Rapids, MI 49509
Phone: (616) 532-2300
 
 
 
Newspapers in Michigan[23]
The Ann Arbor News
Newsroom
340 East Huron Street
P.O. Box 1147
Ann Arbor, MI 48106
Phone: (734) 994-6989
 
Detroit News
Newsroom
615 West Lafayette Boulevard
Detroit, MI 48226
Phone: (313) 222-2300
 
Flint Journal
Newsroom
200 East First Street
Flint, MI 48502-1925
810-766-6100
 
Grand Rapids Press
Newsroom
155 Michigan Street NW
Grand Rapids, MI 49503
Phone: (616) 222-5400
 
Kalamazoo Gazette
Newsroom
401 South Burdick Street
Kalamazoo, MI 49007
Phone: (269) 345-3511
 
Lansing State Journal
Newsroom
120 East Lenawee
Lansing MI 48919
Phone: (517) 377-1020
 
The Macomb Daily
Newsroom
100 Macomb Daily Drive
Mount Clemens, MI 48043
Phone: (586) 469-4510
 
Muskegon Chronicle
Newsroom
P.O. Box 59
Muskegon, MI 49443-0059
Phone: (231) 722-0320
 
The Oakland Press
Newsroom
48 West Huron
Pontiac, MI 48342
Phone: (248) 332-8181
The Saginaw News
Newsroom
203 South Washington Avenue
Saginaw, MI 48607
Phone: (989) 752-7171
   
 
Political Blogs in Michigan
Blogging for Michigan
 
Michigan Liberal
West Michigan Rising
 
 
   
 


[4] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: Detroit also participated in the 2009 YRBS.
[5] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[6] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[7] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[8]  U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.2.
[9] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[10] Ibid., Table B.
[11] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[12] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[13] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[14] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[15] Ibid., Table 16.
[16] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[20] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[21] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[22] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[23] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

 

 

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