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Illinois State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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Illinois

Sexuality Education Law and Policy | Recent Legislation | Youth Statistical Information of Note | Sexual Health Statistics | Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education| Federal Funding of Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs | Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees | Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 09 | Adolescent Health Contact | Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality EducationOrganizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education | Local Newspapers | Political Blogs | References

 
 
Illinois Sexuality Education Law and Policy
The Illinois Critical Health Problems and Comprehensive Health Education Act states that the following topics must be addressed in all elementary and secondary schools:
 
  • human ecology and health;
  • human growth and development;
  • the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life, including sexual abstinence until marriage;
  • prevention and control of disease; and
  • the transmission and spread of AIDS.
 
Any school that teaches sexuality education must also emphasize that, “abstinence is the expected norm in that abstinence from sexual intercourse is the only protection that is 100% effective against unwanted teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome when transmitted sexually.”[1] State law also mandates that schools teach “honor and respect for monogamous heterosexual marriage.”[2] 
 
All courses that discuss sexual intercourse are to address “the hazards of sexual intercourse … the latest medical information citing the failure and success rates of condoms,” and include “explanations of when it is unlawful for males to have sexual relations with females under the age of 18.”[3] Course material must also include information regarding responsible parenting, the availability of confidential adoption services, and the procedure for anonymously relinquishing a newborn infant to law enforcement agencies or hospitals. 
Illinois law also provides guidelines for family life education courses. These courses are “designed to promote wholesome and comprehensive understanding of the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibility aspects of family life,” and therefore, according to the law, “will include teaching alternatives to abortion, appropriate to the various grade levels.” [4] 
 
The Illinois Superintendent of Education must prepare the course of instruction for family life education, make it available to schools districts, and “develop a procedure for evaluating and measuring the effectiveness of the family life courses of instruction in each local school district, including the setting of reasonable goals for reduced sexual activity, sexually transmitted diseases and premarital pregnancy.”[5]
 
Parents or guardians may remove their children from any or all sexuality education, family life programs, and/or STD/HIV programs. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See 105 Illinois Compiled Statutes §§ 110/2 and 110/3, 5/27-9.1–9.2, and 27-11; and 325 Illinois Compiled Statutes § 2/.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Clarify Curriculum Requirements
Senate Bill 3332, introduced in February 2010, would add instruction on the health problems that may result from drug and alcohol use during pregnancy to the existing law governing sexuality education.  The bill passed both the Senate and the House on May 21, 2010, and is awaiting action by Governor Pat Quinn.  If Governor Quinn does not either sign or veto the bill within 60 calendar days of receiving it, it will become law.
 
 
Illinois’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[6]
  • In 2009, 44% of female high school students and 52% of male high school students in Illinois reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in Illinois reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 11% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in Illinois reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 35% of female high school students and 37% of male high school students in Illinois reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 58% of females and 68% of males in Illinois reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 22% of females and 20% of males in Illinois reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 16% of females and 26% of males in Illinois reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 87% of high school students in Illinois reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
Chicago, Illinois
  • In 2009, 45% of female high school students and 62% of male high school students in Chicago, Illinois reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 5% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in Chicago, Illinois reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 10% of female high school students and 29% of male high school students in Chicago, Illinois reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 36% of female high school students and 43% of male high school students in Chicago, Illinois reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 58% of females and 71% of males in Chicago, Illinois reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 11% of females and 11% of males in Chicago, Illinois reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 12% of females and 23% of males in Chicago, Illinois reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 84% of high school students in Chicago, Illinois reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Illinois Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Illinois’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 22nd in the U.S., with a rate of 67 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[7] There were a total of 29,650 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data are available, in Illinois.[8]
 
  • Illinois’s teen birth rate ranked 26th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 38.6 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[9] In 2005, there were a total of 17,041 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Illinois.[10]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[11] In contrast, Illinois’s teen birth rate increased 2% between 2005 and 2006, from 38.6 to 39.5 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[12] 
 
  • Illinois’s teen abortion rate ranks 13th in the U.S., with a rate of 17 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 6,834 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Illinois.[13]  

 

HIV and AIDS
  • Illinois ranks 8th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 936 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in Illinois. [14]
 
  • Illinois’s AIDS rate ranks 18th in the U.S., with a rate of 10.5 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[15]
 
  • Illinois ranks 8th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 1,348 new AIDS cases reported in Illinois.[16]
 
  • Illinois ranks 7th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 21 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Illinois.[17]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Illinois ranks 13th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 22.56 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 20,998 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Illinois.[18] 
 
  • Illinois ranks 8th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 6.79 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 6,321 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Illinois.[19] 
 
  • Illinois ranks 16th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.03 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 27 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Illinois.[20] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in Illinois public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[21]
 
Revised School District Policy
Chicago Public Schools Family Life and Comprehensive Sexual Health Education Policy
In August 2008, the Board of Education for the City of Chicago adopted the “Family Life and Comprehensive Sexual Health Education” policy. The policy amends the original one of the same name  adopted in April of 2006 by incorporating additional education requirements and regulations for comprehensive sexual health education. The policy requires Chicago Public Schools to provide students in grades kindergarten through 12 with “family life and sexual health education” that is comprehensive, age-appropriate, and medically accurate.[22] In addition, the instruction must emphasize “abstinence as the expected norm and the only protection that is 100% effective against unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV when transmitted sexually,” and must “not exclude information required to provide instruction designed to promote a wholesome and comprehensive understanding of the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic and social responsibility aspects of family life.”[23] The policy specifies that family life and comprehensive health education address such topics as “sexual abstinence until marriage, informed decision-marking, and the prevention and control of infection and disease.”  
 
Instruction in grades five through 12 must include information on:
 
  • pregnancy prevention “through the use of medically recommended contraceptives;”
  • the transmission and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) “through the use of medically recommended protective/barrier methods;”
  • “the potential emotional and psychological consequences of preadolescent and adolescent sexual intercourse outside of marriage;”
  • the consequences of unintended teen pregnancy
  • the “financial responsibility owed to children born in and out of wedlock;”
  • laws relating to having sex with a minor under the age of 18;
  • how to respond appropriately to sexual harassment or assault;
  • “responsible parenting;” and
  • “respect for all persons.”[24]
 
While family life and comprehensive sexual health education must be incorporated into each school’s curriculum or program of study, local schools have the authority to determine the courses and programs best suited to meet the requirement.  All instruction must comply with Illinois state code and the Illinois Family Life Guidelines. Fifth grade students must receive a minimum of 10 lessons pertaining to family life and comprehensive sexual health over the course of the school year. Parents have the right to remove their child from instruction with written objection. Any outside presenter must first be approved by the Comprehensive Sexual Health Education Curriculum Committee.[25] The 2008 revision to the policy mandates that instruction regarding the use of contraceptives and barrier methods to prevent unintended pregnancy and STDs, including HIV, begin in fifth grade, which is one year earlier than the original policy had required.[26]
 
Prior to 2006, Chicago Public Schools did not have a set policy in place to require comprehensive sexual health education in district schools. A community advocacy campaign led efforts to institute a sex education policy in the school district. Chicago youth led community efforts to garner support for the passage of a sex education policy; they organized rallies, collected petition signatures, spoke with decision makers, including the CEO of Chicago Public Schools, and testified in front of the school board in order to highlight the need for comprehensive sexuality education in schools. At the same time, district staff were working to revise the health education guidelines. The combined efforts by both youth and adult stakeholders succeeded in affecting policy change at the school board level.[27]
 
Comprehensive Sex Education Programs in Public Schools
Chicago Public Schools
The Chicago Public Schools’ Family Life and AIDS Education (FLAE) program provides comprehensive sexuality education to students in grades kindergarten through 12. The program addresses “the psychosocial development of school-age children,” puberty, adolescent development, STD/HIV and pregnancy prevention, contraception, reporting child abuse, and domestic and teen dating violence among other topics discussed. The program complies with the school district’s policy on human sexuality education and aims to reduce the rates of unintended pregnancy, STDs, and HIV among students, and to help them make informed decisions about their reproductive and sexual health.[28]
 
FLAE utilizes Reducing the Risk: Building Skills to Prevent Pregnancy, STD and HIV, a comprehensive sexuality education curriculum designed for high school students in the ninth and tenth grades that is appropriate for use with multi-ethnic populations. The curriculum is taught by school nurses, psychologists, and social workers who are trained in sex education.[29] The curriculum includes experiential activities that teach students to develop refusal, negotiation, and communication skills. An evaluation of the program published in Family Planning Perspectives found that it increased parent-child communication, especially among Latino youth, delayed the initiation of sexual intercourse, and reduced incidence of unprotected sex among lower-risk youth.[30] The program is currently focusing on training teachers in schools located in five Chicago communities with high STD rates. 
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Illinois public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles.  Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Human Services and community-based organizations in Illinois received $7,942,804 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[31]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Illinois received $1,376,598 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2009. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • The Illinois Department of Human Services distributes federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to 30 sub-grantees, including 14 community-based organizations, six faith-based organizations, four crisis pregnancy centers, four health departments, one health center, and one high school. 
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant required states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match could have been provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Illinois, sub-grantees contributed to the match through a combination of direct revenue and in-kind services.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in Illinois received $5,625,206 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are ten CBAE grantees in Illinois, including four community-based organizations, three crisis pregnancy centers, two faith-based organizations, and one hospital. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • Public and private entities in Illinois received $950,000 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are two AFLA grantees in Illinois, including one faith-based organization and one local health department. 
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Illinois use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to:
  • A.C. Green’s Game Plan
  • ASPIRE: Live your life. Be free.
  • Choosing the Best
  • Navigator
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[32]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Illinois Department of
Human Services
 
 
$1,376,598
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
ABJ Community Services, Inc.
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
Abstinence & Marriage
Education Partnership
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
$512,500
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Ada S. McKinley Community
Services, Inc.
 
 
$50,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Anna-Jonesboro Community
High School
 
 
$50,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aspira Inc. of Illinois
 
 
$50,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Aunt Martha’s Youth Service
Center, Inc.
 
 
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Boone County Department of
Public Health
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Christian Fellowship Flock
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
CareNet Pregnancy Services of DuPage
 
 
 
$499,394
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Caris Prevention Services
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Catholic Charities of the
Diocese of Peoria
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Confederation of
Spanish-American Families
 
 
$74,500
 
(sub-grant)
 
$600,000
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
 
Cultivadores/Cultivators
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Delta Center, Inc.
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Demoiselle 2 Femme
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
East Side Health District
 
 
$50,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Family Advocacy Services
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Family Centered Education
Agency, Inc.
 
 
$65,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Forward P.C.
 
$70,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Fulfilling Our Responsibility Unto Mankind (F.O.R.U.M.)
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Hult Center for Health Education
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
I Am Able Center for
Family Development
 
 
$600,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Joyous Years Youth Empowerment
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Lydia Home Association
 
 
 
$464,160
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
Metro-East Crisis Pregnancy Center (d.b.a. Mosaic Pregnancy &
Health Centers)
 
 
 
$599,527
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
The Miracle Center
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Muslim Women Resource Center
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Pregnancy Aid South Suburbs
 
 
$65,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Pui Tak Center
 
 
$40,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Resurrection Health Care
 
 
$75,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Saints Mary & Elizabeth
Medical Center, Division of Resurrection Health Care
 
 
 
$549,625
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Shawnee Crisis Pregnancy Centers
 
 
$60,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Society for the Preservation of
Human Dignity
 
 
$65,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Solid Ground
 
$50,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Southside Pregnancy Center
 
 
$75,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Tazewell County Health Department
 
 
$42,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
Y2Kwanzaa.org
 
 
$20,000
 
(sub-grant)
 
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[33]
Anna Maria Accove
Illinois Department of Human Services
Division of Community Health and Prevention
535 West Jefferson Street
Springfield, IL 62702
Phone: (312) 793-4605
 
 
Illinois Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Illinois
180 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 2300
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: (312) 201-9740
 
Chicago Foundation for Women
1 East Wacker Drive, Suite 1620
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone: (312) 577-2801
AIDS Foundation of Chicago
200 West Jackson Boulevard, Suite 2200
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: (312) 922-2322
 
Center on Halsted
3656 North Halsted
Chicago, IL 60613
Phone: (773) 472-6469
Champaign-Urbana Health District
201 West Kenyon Street
Champaign, IL 61820
Phone: (217) 352-7961
 
Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health
226 South Wabash Avenue, Suite 900
Chicago, IL 60604
Phone: (312) 427-4460
Illinois Gender Advocates
47 West Division Street, #391
Chicago, IL 60610
(630) 219-0526
 
Illinois Parent-Teacher Association
P.O. Box 907
Springfield, IL 62705
Phone: 1-800-877-9617
 
Illinois Planned Parenthood Council
1000 East Washington
Springfield, IL 62703
Phone: (217) 544-2744
 
Illinois Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
Local Affiliate: Rev. Ed Searl
c/o Unitarian Universalist Church of Hinsdale
17 W. Maple St.
Hinsdale, IL 60521
(630) 323-2885
 
Mujeres Latinas en Accion
2124 West 21st Place
Chicago, IL 60608
Phone: (773) 890-7676
 
Planned Parenthood of Illinois
18 South Michigan Avenue, 6th Floor
Chicago, IL 60603
Phone: (312) 592-6800
Rape Crisis Services
1304 East Main St.
Urbana, IL 61801
Phone: 217-384-4462
 
 
 
Illinois Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Eagle Forum of Illinois
P.O. Box 618
Alton, IL 62002
Phone: (618) 462-5415
Illinois Family Institute
P.O. Box 88848
Carol Stream, IL 60188
Phone: (708) 781-9328
 
Illinois Federation for Right to Life
2600 State Street, Suite E
Alton, IL  62002
Phone: (618) 466-4122
 
 
 
Newspapers in Illinois[34]
Belleville News-Democrat
Newsroom
120 South Illinois Street
Belleville, IL 62220
Phone: (618) 239-2451
 
Chicago Sun-Times
Newsroom
350 North Orleans Street
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: (312) 321-2522
 
Chicago Tribune
Newsroom
435 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: (312) 222-4411
 
Daily Herald
Newsroom
155 East Algonquin Road
Arlington Heights, IL 60005
Phone: (847) 427-4300
 
The Daily Journal
Newsroom
8 Dearborn Square
Kankakee, IL 60901
Phone: (815) 937-3382
 
Hoy Chicago
Newsroom
435 North Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: (312) 527-8467
Journal Star
Newsroom
1 News Plaza
Peoria, IL 61643
Phone: (309) 686-3000
 
Rockford Register Star
Newsroom
99 East State Street
Rockford, IL 61104
Phone: (815) 987-1374
 
The State Journal-Register
Newsroom
1 Copley Plaza
Springfield, IL 62701
Phone: (217) 788-1300
 
 
 
Political Blogs in Illinois
Chicago Now
 
Illinois Democratic Network
 
Illinois Policy Institute
 
Prairie State Blue: Progressive Illinois Politics
Progress Illinois
 
 
 


[3] 105 Ill. Comp. Stat. §§ 5/27-9.1(c)(5) and (7). 
[5] Ibid. 
[6] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: Chicago also participated in the 2009 YRBS. 
[7] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[8] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[9] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[10]  U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.2.
[11] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[12] Ibid., Table B.
[13] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.5.
[14] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[15] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[16] Ibid., Table 16.                                                                                                                              
[17] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[18] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[19] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[20] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[21] This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified.
[22] Section 704.6 “Family Life and Comprehensive Sexual Health Education,” Chicago Public Schools Policy Manual, adopted 27 August 2008, accessed 24 May 2010, <http://policy.cps.k12.il.us/documents/704.6.pdf>.
[23] Ibid.
[24] Ibid.
[25] Ibid.
[26] “The Chicago Public Schools’ Family Life and Comprehensive Sexual Health Education Policy,” Urban Initiative for Reproductive Health, National Institute for Reproductive Health, April 2010, accessed 24 May 2010, <http://www.urbaninitiative.org/>.
[27] Ibid.
[28] Ibid.
[29] Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008), accessed 30 March 2010, <http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/storage/advfy/documents/sciencesuccess.pdf>, 22.
[30] Ibid., 23–24.
[31] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[32] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009.
[33] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[34] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues.  For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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