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California State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

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California

Sexuality Education Law and Policy | Recent Legislation | Youth Statistical Information of Note | Sexual Health Statistics | Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education| Federal Funding of Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs | Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees | Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 09 | Adolescent Health Contact | Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality EducationOrganizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education | Local Newspapers | Political Blogs | References

 
California Sexuality Education Law and Policy
California does not require schools to teach sexuality education, though they are required to teach HIV/AIDS education to students at least once in middle school and once in high school. If schools do teach additional sexuality education, which they are permitted to do in kindergarten through 12th grade, they must follow certain guidelines. 
 
California state law requires that all instruction be age-appropriate and medically accurate, which is defined as “verified or supported by research conducted in compliance with scientific methods and published in peer-reviewed journals, where appropriate, and recognized as accurate and objective by professional organizations and agencies with expertise in the relevant field, such as the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Public Health Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.”[1]
 
In addition, California law stipulates that “instruction and materials shall be appropriate for use with pupils of all races, genders, sexual orientations, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and pupils with disabilities.”[2] Furthermore, programs “may not promote or teach religious doctrine.”[3] Instruction must also encourage parent-child communication about sexuality. 
Beginning in grade seven, all human sexuality instruction must include information about abstinence “while also providing medically accurate information on other methods of preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).”[4]  This instruction must “provide information about the effectiveness and safety of all FDA-approved contraceptive methods in preventing pregnancy, including, but not limited to, emergency contraception.”[5]
 
Each school district must provide in-service training for all teachers and school employees who teach HIV-prevention education. School districts may contract with outside consultants either to teach students or provide the in-service training. California also mandates that all community-based programs using state funds or state-administered funds to prevent unintended pregnancies and STDs adhere to requirements similar to those for school-based programs; instruction must be medically accurate, age-appropriate, culturally and linguistically appropriate for its intended audience, and comprehensive.
 
Parents or guardians may remove their children from sexuality education and/or STD/HIV education classes.  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See California Education Code §§ 51930–51939, California Health and Safety Code §§ 151000–151003., Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve, and Health Education Framework for California Public Schools: Kindergarten Through Grade Twelve.  
 
 
Recent Legislation
California Teen Dating Violence Prevention Act Introduced
SB 1300, introduced in February 2010, would allow school districts to include age-appropriate education about preventing dating violence in its sexuality education programs for students in grades seven through 12. This instruction would have to be medically accurate and be suitable for all students, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, cultural background, or disability. Although sexual violence currently is included in the health education standards, SB 1300 seeks to help students learn to form healthy relationships by identifying varying levels of violence, from insults to physical and sexual abuse. The bill passed the Senate Appropriations Committee in May with no opposition. No further action has been taken.     
 
 
California’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[6]
Los Angeles, California
  • In 2009, 33% of female high school students and 44% of male high school students in Los Angeles, California reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 2% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in Los Angeles, California reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 4% of female high school students and 14% of male high school students in Los Angeles, California reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 23% of female high school students and 28% of male high school students in Los Angeles, California reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 54% of females and 67% of males in Los Angeles, California reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 8% of females and 8% of males in Los Angeles, California reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 13% of females and 24% of males in Los Angeles, California reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 85% of high school students in Los Angeles, California reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
San Bernardino, California
  • In 2009, 40% of female high school students and 58% of male high school students in San Bernardino, California reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 12% of male high school students in San Bernardino, California reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 7% of female high school students and 22% of male high school students in San Bernardino, California reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 30% of female high school students and 41% of male high school students in San Bernardino, California reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 55% of females and 63% of males in San Bernardino, California reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 6% of females and 9% of males in San Bernardino, California reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 16% of females and 28% of males in San Bernardino, California reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 81% of high school students in San Bernardino, California reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
San Diego, California
  • In 2009, 34% of female high school students and 44% of male high school students in San Diego, Californiareported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
  
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 7% of male high school students in San Diego, Californiareported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 7% of female high school students and 15% of male high school students in San Diego, Californiareported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 25% of female high school students and 30% of male high school students in San Diego, Californiareported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 62% of females and 69% of males in San Diego, Californiareported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 20% of females and 16% of males in San Diego, Californiareported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 1719% of females and 24% of males in San Diego, Californiareported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 88% of high school students in San Diego, Californiareported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
San Francisco, California
  • In 2009, 25% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students in San Francisco, California reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 2% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in San Francisco, Californiareported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2009, 6% of female high school students and 14% of male high school students in San Francisco, Californiareported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
  
  • In 2009, 19% of female high school students and 22% of male high school students in San Francisco, Californiareported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 54% of females and 59% of males in San Francisco, Californiareported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 12% of females and 17% of males in San Francisco, Californiareported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 15% of females and 27% of males in San Francisco, Californiareported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 85% of high school students in San Francisco, Californiareported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 87% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
California Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • California’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 16th in the U.S., with a rate of 75 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[7] There were a total of 96,490 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data is available, in California.[8]
 
  • California’s teen birth rate ranked 25th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 38.8 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[9] In 2005, there were a total of 50,034 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in California.[10]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[11] In contrast, California’s teen birth rate increased 3% between 2005 and 2006, from 38.8 to 39.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[12] 
 
HIV and AIDS
  • California ranks 3rd in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 2,687 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed in California. [13]
 
  • California’s AIDS rate ranks 11th in the U.S., with a rate of 13.5 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[14]
 
  • California ranks 1st in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 4,952 new AIDS cases reported in California.[15]
 
  • California ranks 3rd in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 41 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in California.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • California ranks 34th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 27.37 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 5,408 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in California.[17] 
 
  • California ranks 7th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 7.57 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 1,496 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in California.[18] 
 
  • California ranks 16thin reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.03 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 75 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in California.[19] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS has identified some examples of model programs, policies, and best practices being implemented in California public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.[20]
 
Updated State Health Education Standards
Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve
In March 2008, the California State Board of Education adopted the state’s first-ever health education content standards, Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve. While the standards are not binding, “local educators are encouraged to apply [the] standards when developing curricular and instructional strategies for health education.”[21] The health education content standards were developed to comply with a state law passed in 2005 requiring the State Board of Education to adopt content standards for health. The standards focus on providing youth with the skills “to make healthy choices and avoid high-risk behaviors.”[22]
 
The education standards are organized into six content areas, with Growth, Development and Sexual Health listed as one. The standards recommend that sexual health is addressed in grades five, seven and eight, as well as in high school.  Beginning in grade five, the standards suggest that essential concepts for Growth, Development and Sexual Health instruction discuss “the human cycle of reproduction,” the human reproductive system, and puberty, and provide definitions for the terms sexually transmitted disease, HIV, and AIDS.[23]  For grades six and seven, essential concepts for instruction include, among others, “explain the effectiveness of abstinence in preventing HIV, other STDs, and unintended pregnancy,” “explain the effectiveness of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives in preventing HIV, other STDs, and unintended pregnancy,” and “recognize that there are individual differences in growth and development, physical appearance, gender roles, and sexual orientation.” [24] Essential concepts for high school grade levels include, among others, “discuss the characteristics of healthy relationships, dating, committed relationships, and marriage,” “identify why abstinence is the most effective method for the prevention of HIV, other STDs and pregnancy,” and “evaluate the safety and effectiveness, (including success and failure rates) of FDA-approved condoms and other contraceptives in preventing HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy.”[25]        
 
Comprehensive Sex Education Programs in Public Schools
Los Angeles Unified School District
The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) requires that all teachers and administrators for grades K–12 comply with the statutes of the California Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Act, and therefore mandates schools to “provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to protect their sexual health and reproductive health from unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases” and to “encourage all students to develop healthy attitudes about adolescent growth and development, body image, gender roles, sexual orientation, dating, marriage, and family.”[26] 
 
In compliance with the states Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Act requirement to provide HIV/AIDS-prevention education to students in grades seven through 12 at least once in middle school and once in high school, LAUSD students must receive such instruction for five class periods in middle school and five class periods in high school.[27]  Among other requirements, HIV/AIDS-prevention education instruction must include a “discussion of methods to reduce the risk of HIV infection.”[28] Such instruction must “emphasize that sexual abstinence, monogamy, avoidance of multiple sexual partners, and avoidance of intravenous drug use are the most effective means for HIV/AIDS prevention.”[29] Instruction must also include the latest statistics from the medical field on the success and failure rates of condoms in preventing HIV and on “methods that may reduce the risk of HIV transmission from intravenous drug use.”[30] 
 
All district teachers providing HIV/AIDS-prevention education must complete an eight-hour, skills-based training.[31] The district provides training and curriculum materials for its HIV/AIDS-prevention education through funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Division of Adolescent and School Health (CDC-DASH).[32] LAUSD schools are permitted to contract with outside agencies to provide instruction; however, all agencies must be approved by the school district’s HIV/AIDS Prevention Unit. All curricula and materials used by outside agencies must comply with the California Education Code and be deemed “acceptable, appropriate, research-based and validated, medically accurate, bias-free, and inclusive of all populations.”[33]
 
All LAUSD schools use the district-adopted and required STD/HIV curriculum, Positive Prevention: HIV/STD Prevention Education for America’s Youth (Positive Prevention).  Developed by the Orange County Chapter of the American Red Cross, Positive Prevention is a “research-validated” curriculum designed for use with middle school and high school students, alternative students, including home-schooled and special education students, and developmentally disabled adults. [34]  In LAUSD schools the curriculum must be taught with a sexual health supplement in order to meet the requirements of the California Education Code.[35]
 
An evaluation of the curriculum published in the American Journal of Health Education found that it, “significantly increased positive attitudes toward abstaining from sexual intercourse, increased self-efficacy to abstain from sexual activity, and increased self-efficacy to use condoms” among participants.[36]
 
San Diego Unified School District
San Diego public schools provide comprehensive sex education and HIV instruction through its Sex Education and HIV Prevention Program. The program’s primary goals are to “deliver accurate information to students,” “provide students a way to examine their attitudes and beliefs,” “assist students in the development of interpersonal skills,” and “promote responsible behavior.”[37] The program uses a locally developed, research-based curriculum.   
 
Program instruction consists of a ten-day family life education curriculum in sixth grade, a ten-day sex education curriculum offered in grades eight and 10 or 11, and HIV-prevention instruction in grades nine through 12. All program instruction complies with California Education Code, which requires instruction to be age-appropriate and consist of “factual, medically accurate, and objective information” that is “free of bias and acceptable to all students.”[38] The sex education curriculum in particular emphasizes abstinence and teaches “respect for marriage and committed relationships” while also providing instruction on STD transmission and risk-reduction, and the effectiveness of condoms and contraception, including emergency contraception (EC). 
 
Instruction for grades six and eight also includes a parent/child activity packs, which provide education exercises for parents and students to complete together at home. The activity packs serve to promote parent-child communication, create an environment in the home for discussing human sexuality, and encourage the discussion of family values while also providing instructional information and reinforcing classroom curriculum.[39]  
 
The Sex Education and HIV Prevention Program requires teachers to undergo a mandatory two-day training. Funding for training is provided through CDC-DASH. Health educators from local agencies must also participate in the district training and use district materials if they are going to teach instruction in San Diego schools. The school district holds partnerships with several local agencies that assist with providing instruction, including local Planned Parenthood affiliates, Operation Samahan, YMCA Teen Link, SAY San Diego, Family Health Centers of San Diego, San Diego Family Cares, and Neighborhood House.[40] 
 
San Francisco Unified School District
Through support from its CDC-DASH funded grant, the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) provides HIV-prevention education to all secondary school students and provides supports services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) students to “help create a safer school environment.”[41] The school district administers the Positive Prevention curriculum to students along with additional supplemental materials. (See the above description about the Los Angeles Unified School District for more information about Positive Prevention). 
 
The district’s Student Support Services Department manages the Student Support Services for LGBTQ Youth program, which provides curriculum, classroom resources, and strategies designed to meet the needs of LGBTQ students and support a healthy school environment. The SFUSD Health Education Curriculum Policy requires students to receive “family diversity” instruction in elementary school and “sexual orientation/gender diversity” instruction in middle and high school.[42] In elementary school, students receive two family diversity lessons per year. Sexual orientation and gender diversity lessons are incorporated into “Diversity Education and Violence Prevention” instruction provided to secondary school students through health education. In middle school, students receive seven periods of Diversity Education and Violence Prevention instruction while high school students receive 10 periods. Lessons are locally produced.[43] In April 2010, SFUSD launched its first-ever, school-based website designed to address topics related to LGBTQ youth as a resource for the district’s teachers, staff, students, and families.[44]  
  
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in California public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles. Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading. 
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
Community-based organizations in California received $4,582,943 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[45]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • California chose not to participate in the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program in Fiscal Year 2009. The state was eligible for approximately $7,055,239 in funding. Due to the expiration of the grant program on June 30, 2009, three months prior to the end of the federal fiscal year, the state would have received three quarters of the total funding allocated for the full fiscal year.
  • California is the only state to have never participated in the federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program.
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in California received $3,395,376 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are six CBAE grantees in California, including four community-based organizations and two faith-based organizations. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • Organizations in California received $1,187,567 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are two AFLA grantees in California, including one community-based organization and one hospital. 
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in California use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to:
  • Choosing the Best
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[46]
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
California Hispanic Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
 
 
Catholic Healthcare West (d.b.a. Northridge Hospital Medical Center)
 
 
 
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Free to Be
 
 
 
$540,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Imperial Valley Regional Occupational Program
 
 
 
$495,837
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
Juvenile Assistance Diversion Effort
 
 
 
 
$560,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Kings Community Action Organization
 
 
 
 
 
$237,567
 
(2004–2009)
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
New Harvest Christian Fellowship, Inc.
 
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2006–2011)
 
 
 
Pacific Camps Family Resource
 
 
 
$599,539
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[47]
Sharla Smith
HIV/AIDS Consultant
School Health Connections
California Department of Education
1430 North Street, #6408
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone: (916) 319-0914
 
 
California Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Northern California
39 Drumm Street
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 621-2493
 
ACOG, District IX (CA)
1425 River Park Drive, Suite 235
Sacramento, CA 95815
Phone: (916) 446-2264
 
Ally Action
106 San Pablo Towne Center #319
San Pablo, CA 94806
Phone: (925) 685-5480
 
Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice
1440 Broadway, Suite 301
Oakland, CA 94612
Phone: (510) 663-8300
Asian Health Services
818 Webster Street
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: (510) 986-6800
 
Bay Area Communities for Health Education
2977 Ygnacio Valley Road, #187
Walnut Creek, CA 94598
Phone: (925) 899-6789
 
California Latinas for Reproductive Justice
Post Office Box 412225
Los Angeles, CA 90041
Phone: (213) 270-5258
 
Campfire USA Orange County Council
1505 East 17th Street, Suite 225
Santa Ana, CA 92705
Phone: (714) 547-5200
 
Center for Research on Adolescent Health and Development
Public Health Institute
555 12th Street, 10th floor
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: (510) 285-5500
 
Fresno Barrios Unidos
4415 East Tulare Avenue
Fresno, CA 93702
Phone: (559) 452-9662
Gay-Straight Alliance Network
1550 Bryant Street, Suite 800
San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: (415) 552-4229
 
Health Initiatives for Youth
235 Montgomery Street, Suite 430
San Francisco, CA 94104
Phone: (415) 274-1970
 
NARAL Pro-Choice California
111 Pine Street, Suite 1500
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 890-1020
 
Pacific Institute for Women’s Health
Pharmacy Access Partnership
614 Grand Avenue, #324
Oakland, CA 94610
Phone: (510) 272-0150
 
Physicians for Reproductive Choice and
Health
PO Box 590772
San Francisco, CA 94159
Phone: (415) 734-8500
 
Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California
555 Capitol Mall, Suite 510
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone: (916) 446-5247
 
San Francisco AIDS Foundation
995 Market Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: (415) 487-3000
Tapestry (Humboldt County Office of Education)
901 Myrtle Avenue
Eureka, CA 95501
Phone: (707) 445-7179
 
Teen Pregnancy Coalition of San Mateo County
703 Woodside Road, Suite 7
Redwood City, CA 94061
Phone: (650) 367-1937
 
YWCA of the Harbor Area and South Bay
437 9th Street
San Pedro, CA 90731
Phone: (310) 547-0831
 
California Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Abiding Truth Ministries
P.O. Box 891023
Temecula, CA 92589
Phone: (916) 965-8925          
 
Capital Resource Institute
660 J Street, Suite 250
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone: (916) 498-1940
 
California ProLife Council
2306 J Street, Suite 200
Sacramento, CA 95816
Phone: (916) 442-8315
California Right to Life
P.O. Box 4343
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Phone: (925) 944-5351  
 
Citizens for Excellence in Education
P.O. Box 3200
Costa Mesa, CA 92628
Phone: (714) 546-2226
 
First Resort Medical and Counseling Offices
400 30th Street, Suite 401
Oakland, CA 94609
Phone: (510) 891-9998
Life Research Institute
4279 Armand Drive
Concord, CA 94521
Pacific Justice Institute
P.O. Box 276600
Sacramento, CA 95827
Phone: (916) 857-6900
 
Right to Life League of Southern California
1028 North Lake Avenue, Suite 207
Pasadena, CA 91104
Phone: (626) 398-6100
 
Sanctity of Human Life Network
P.O. Box 342
Fair Oaks, CA 95628
Phone: (916) 481-8926
 
Traditional Values Coalition
100 South Anaheim Boulevard, Suite 350
Anaheim, CA 92805
Phone: (714) 520-0300
 
United States Justice Foundation
932 D Street, Suite 2
Ramona, CA 92065
Phone: (760) 788-6624
 
Westside Pregnancy Resource Center
11500 West Olympic Boulevard, Suite 570
Los Angeles, CA 90064
Phone: (310) 268-8400
Women’s Resource Network
2411 East Valley Parkway, #315
Escondido, CA 92046
Phone: (760) 741-5114
 
Newspapers in California[48]
Bakersfield Californian
Newsroom
1707 Eye Street
Bakersfield, CA 93301
Phone: (661) 395-7500
 
Contra Costa Times
Newsroom
P.O. Box 8099
Walnut Creek, CA 94596
Phone: (925) 943-8235
 
The Fresno Bee
Newsroom
1626 E Street
Fresno, CA 93786
Phone: (559) 441-6330
 
Los Angeles Times
Newsroom
202 West 1st Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: (213) 237-5000
 
The Modesto Bee
Newsroom
1325 H Street
Modesto, CA 95352
Phone: (209) 578-2028
 
Oakland Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 28884
Oakland, CA 94604
Phone: (510) 208-6450
 
Orange County Register
Newsroom
625 North Grand Avenue
Santa Ana, CA 92701
Phone: (714) 796-7951
 
The Press Democrat
Newsroom
P.O. Box 910
Santa Rosa, CA 95402
Phone: (707) 546-2020
 
The Press-Enterprise
Newsroom
P.O. Box 792
Riverside, CA 92502
Phone: (951) 368-9549
 
The Sacramento Bee
Newsroom
P.O. Box 15779
Sacramento, CA 95852
Phone: (916) 321-1001
 
San Diego Union-Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 120191
San Diego, CA 92112
Phone: (619) 293-1211
 
San Francisco Chronicle
Newsroom
901 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: (415) 777-1111
 
San Jose Mercury News
Newsroom
750 Ridder Park Drive
San Jose, CA 95190
Phone: (408) 920-5444
 
Ventura County Star
Newsroom
5250 Ralston Street
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[2] Cal. Ed. Code § 51933(b)(4). 
[3] Cal. Ed. Code § 51933(d)(1). 
[4] Cal. Ed. Code § 51933(b)(8). 
[6] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Note: California did not participate in the 2009 YRBS; however, some large cities in California did participate in the survey. 
[7] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[8] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[9] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[10] Ibid., Table 12.
[11] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[12] Ibid., Table B.
[13] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[14] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” Kaiser Family Foundation, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[15] Ibid., Table 16.
[16] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta:GA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[20] This is by no means a complete list of all comprehensive programming and policies related to sexuality education, but rather some examples of best practices and model programs that SIECUS identified.  
[21] “A Message from the State Board of Education and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction,” Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, March 2008), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf>, v.
[22] “Background of the Standards,” Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, March 2008), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf>, vii.
[23] “Grade Five: Growth, Development and Sexual Health,” Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, March 2008), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf>, 24.
[24] “Grades Seven and Eight: Growth, Development and Sexual Health,” Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, March 2008), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf>, 35.
[25] “High School (Grades Nine through Twelve),” Development and Sexual Health,” Health Education Content Standards for California Public Schools, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve (Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, March 2008), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/documents/healthstandmar08.pdf>, 47.
[26] California Education Code §§ 51930(b)(1)–(2); see also “Complying with the California Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Act (SB 71),” Los Angeles Unified School District BUL-1132.3 Attachment A, 8 September 2008, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://notebook.lausd.net/pls/ptl/docs/PAGE/CA_LAUSD/FLDR_ORGANIZATIONS/STUDENT_HEALTH_HUMAN_SERVICES/BUL-1132.3.PDF>.
[27] “Complying with the California Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Act (SB 71),” <http://notebook.lausd.net/pls/ptl/docs/PAGE/CA_LAUSD/FLDR_ORGANIZATIONS/STUDENT_HEALTH_HUMAN_SERVICES/BUL-1132.3.PDF>, 3.
[28] California Education Code § 51934(3); see also “Complying with the California Comprehensive Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Prevention Education Act (SB 71),” <http://notebook.lausd.net/pls/ptl/docs/PAGE/CA_LAUSD/FLDR_ORGANIZATIONS/STUDENT_HEALTH_HUMAN_SERVICES/BUL-1132.3.PDF>, 3.
[29] Ibid.
[30] Ibid.
[31] “Required Curriculum for HIV Prevention-Education,” Los Angeles Unified School District HIV/AIDS Prevention Unit, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://aidspreventionlausd.net/teachersandstaff.html>.
[32] “Local Agencies: Los Angeles, California”, Healthy Youth! (Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion), accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/states/locals/ca-losangeles.htm>.
[33] Email correspondence to Morgan Marshall from Tim Kordic, project advisor for the Los Angeles Unified School District HIV/AIDS Prevention Unit, 4 February 2010.
[34] “Positive Prevention: HIV/STD Education for America’s Youth,” American Red Cross, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.positiveprevention.com/>.
[35] “Required Curriculum for HIV Prevention-Education,” <http://aidspreventionlausd.net/teachersandstaff.html>.
[36] “Preliminary Findings,” Positive Prevention: HIV/STD Education for America’s Youth, American Red Cross, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.positiveprevention.com/prelim_findings.html>.
[37] “Overview,” Sexual Education, San Diego Unified School District, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.sandi.net/204510915162157563/site/default.asp>.
[38] Marge Kleinsmith-Hildebrand, “Laws and Policies for Sex Education and HIV Prevention,” PowerPoint presentation, San Diego Unified School District, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.sandi.net/204510915162157563/blank/browse.asp?A=383&BMDRN=2000&BCOB=0&C=57999>.
[39] “Parent/Child Activities: Family Life Education Grade 6,” San Diego Unified School District, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://www.sandi.net/204510915162157563/lib/204510915162157563/Parent%20Packets/Parent%20Packet%20Gr%206%20Eng%204017.pdf>.
[40] Email correspondence to Morgan Marshall from Marge Kleinsmith-Hildebrand, resource teacher for the San Diego Unified School District HIV Prevention and Sex Education Program, 5 February 2010.
[41] Email correspondence to Morgan Marshall from Rosalia Lopez, Student Support Services Department, San Francisco Unified School District, 5 February 2010.
[42] “Curriculum,” Support Services for LGBTQ Youth, San Francisco Unified School District Student Support Services Department, accessed 4 May 2010, <http://healthiersf.org/LGBTQ/InTheClassroom/curriculum.html>.
[43] Ibid.
[44] Email correspondence to Morgan Marshall from Rosalia Lopez.
[45] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[46] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009.
[47] SIECUS has identified this position as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[48] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms.  This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues.  For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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