SIECUS Logo

Support SIECUS!

Make sexuality education available to all.

Stay informed!

Sign up for SIECUS newsletters, updates, action alerts, and more!

Quick Links

Arizona State Profile Fiscal Year 2009

 Click Here for Printer Friendly Version (PDF) 

Arizona

 
Arizona Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Arizona law does not require schools to teach sexuality education or sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV education.  However, Arizona law does state that if a school chooses to teach these topics, instruction must be age-appropriate and must stress abstinence.  Further, if a school chooses to teach HIV education, such instruction must be medically accurate, but cannot promote a “homosexual lifestyle,” portray “homosexuality as a positive alternative life-style,” or “suggest that some methods of sex are safe methods of homosexual sex.”[1]
Arizona Administrative Code R7-2-303 states that schools may “provide a specific elective lesson or lessons concerning sex education as a supplement to the health course of study.” Schools that choose to provide sex education must have the lessons approved by the local governing board. [2] All sex education materials and instruction that discuss sexual intercourse must:
 
  • stress that pupils should abstain from sexual intercourse until they are mature adults;
  • emphasize that abstinence from sexual intercourse is the only method for avoiding pregnancy that is 100% effective;
  • stress that sexually transmitted diseases have severe consequences and constitute a serious and widespread public health problem;
  • include a discussion of the possible emotional and psychological consequences of preadolescent and adolescent sexual intercourse and the consequences of preadolescent and adolescent pregnancy;
  • promote honor and respect for monogamous heterosexual marriage; and
  • advise pupils of Arizona law pertaining to the financial responsibilities of parenting and legal liabilities related to sexual intercourse with a minor.[3]
 
In Arizona, parents or guardians may remove their children from sexuality or STD/HIV instruction.  This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.  If a school chooses to provide a supplemental sexuality education course, the state requires written consent from parents before students may attend.  This is referred to as an “opt-in” policy.
 
See Arizona Revised Statutes §§ 15-711, 15-716, 15-102 and Arizona Administrative Code § R7-2-303.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Parents’ Bill of Rights Act Signed into Law
Senate Bill 1309, introduced in January 2010, establishes a Parents’ Bill of Rights, which includes the right of parents to direct the education and moral development of their children. Among its myriad provisions, SB 1309 requires public schools in Arizona to receive written permission from parents before any student can participate in a sexuality education course. This is referred to as an “opt-in” policy. Parents also are allowed to withdraw their children from any instruction or presentation regarding sexuality in other courses including discussion of STDs and HIV.  The bill passed the state legislature in April and was signed into law by Governor Jan Brewer on May 10th, 2010.
 
Legislation to Require Comprehensive Sex Education
House Bill 2361, which was introduced in January 2010, would have required that all school districts provide medically accurate and age-appropriate comprehensive sex education, which would include information about contraception as well as abstinence and instruction on STDs including HIV/AIDS.   HB 2361 would also have removed the current provision in the law barring sex education courses from suggesting that homosexuality is a positive lifestyle or that there are safe methods of same-sex sexual activity, and would have required the State Department of Education to provide curriculum suggestions, teacher training, and a list of available teaching aids to school districts.  The bill was referred to the House Committees on Education; Health and Human Services; and Rules, where it died after the second reading.
 
 
Arizona’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[4]
  • In 2009, 45% of female high school students and 52% of male high school students in Arizona reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 46% of male high school students nationwide.
                 
  • In 2009, 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students in Arizona reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 3% of female high school students and 8% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 10% of female high school students and 17% of male high school students in Arizona reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 11% of female high school students and 16% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, 34% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students in Arizona reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 50% of females and 71% of males in Arizona reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 54% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 16% of females and 18% of males in Arizona reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 23% of females and 16% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2009, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 16% of females and 28% of males in Arizona reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 17% of females and 26% of males nationwide.
 
 
Arizona Youth Sexual Health Statistics
Teen Pregnancy, Birth, and Abortion
  • Arizona’s teen pregnancy rate ranks 4th in the U.S., with a rate of 89 pregnancies per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 70 pregnancies per 1,000.[5] There were a total of 18,100 pregnancies among young women ages 15–19 reported in 2005, the most recent year for which data is available, in Arizona.[6]
 
  • Arizona’s teen birth rate ranked 6th in the U.S. in 2005, with a rate of 58.2 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 40.5 births per 1,000.[7] In 2005, there were a total of 11,828 live births reported to young women ages 15–19 in Arizona.[8]
 
  • In 2006, the U.S. teen birth rate increased for the first time in 15 years by 3% from 40.5 to 41.9 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19, after having steadily declined between 1991 and 2005.[9] In contrast, Arizona’s teen birth rate increased 7% between 2005 and 2006, from 58.2 to 62 births per 1,000 young women ages 15–19.[10] 
 
  • Arizona’s teen abortion rate ranks 34th in the U.S., with a rate of 9 abortions per 1,000 young women ages 15–19 compared to the national rate of 19 abortions per 1,000. In 2005, there were a total of 1,896 abortions reported among young women ages 15–19 in Arizona.[11]  
 
HIV and AIDS
  • Arizona ranks 15th in cases of HIV infection diagnosed in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 488 new cases of HIV infection diagnosed. [12]
 
  • Arizona ranks 17th in cases of HIV/AIDS diagnosed among young people ages 13–19 out of the 34 states with confidential, name-based HIV infection reporting. In 2007, there were a total of 26 young people ages 13–19 diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in Arizona.[13]
 
  • Arizona’s AIDS rate ranks 20th in the U.S., with a rate of 9.2 cases per 100,000 population compared to the national rate of 12.5 cases per 100,000.[14]
 
  • Arizona ranks 19th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among all age groups. In 2007, there were a total of 585 new AIDS cases reported in Arizona.[15]
 
  • Arizona ranks 26th in number of reported AIDS cases in the U.S. among young people ages 13–19. In 2007, there were a total of 3 AIDS cases reported among young people ages 13–19 in Arizona.[16]
 
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Arizona ranks 25th in reported cases of Chlamydia among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 18.76 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 19.51 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 8,176 cases of Chlamydia reported among young people ages 15–19 in Arizona.[17] 
 
  • Arizona ranks 36th in reported cases of gonorrhea among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 1.73 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 4.52 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 756 cases of gonorrhea reported among young people ages 15–19 in Arizona.[18] 
 
  • Arizona ranks 16th in reported cases of primary and secondary syphilis among young people ages 15–19 in the U.S., with an infection rate of 0.03 cases per 1,000 compared to the national rate of 0.04 cases per 1,000. In 2008, there were a total of 14 cases of syphilis reported among young people ages 15–19 in Arizona.[19] 
 
 
Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Education
SIECUS is not aware of any examples of model programs, policies, or best practices being implemented in Arizona public schools that provide a more comprehensive approach to sex education for young people.
 
We encourage you to submit any updated or additional information on comprehensive approaches to sex education being implemented in Arizona public schools for inclusion in future publications of the SIECUS State Profiles.  Please visit SIECUS’ “Contact Us” webpage at www.siecus.org to share information. Select “state policy” as the subject heading.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs
The Department of Health Services and community-based organizations in Arizona received $4,459,346 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2009.[20]
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until Marriage Funding
  • Arizona originally chose not to participate in the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program for Fiscal Year 2009; however, under the new administration of Governor Jan Brewer, who entered office in December 2009, the state did elect to apply for the funds. The state submitted a late application in March 2009 and received the funding award in April of the same year. Because of the shortened disbursement period, Arizona was not able to allocate the funding and the award was returned in full to the federal Administration for Children and Families. The state received and later returned approximately $1,034,776 in funding. 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) Funding
  • Organizations in Arizona received $2,949,570 in CBAE funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
  • There are five CBAE grantees in Arizona, including three community-based organizations, one crisis pregnancy center, and one faith-based organization. 
 
Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Funding
  • There is one AFLA grantee in Arizona, the Pima Prevention Partnership, which received $475,000 in AFLA funding for Fiscal Year 2009.
 
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Curricula Used by Grantees
Some abstinence-only-until-marriage grantees in Arizona use commercially available curricula. These include, but are not limited to:
  • ASPIRE: Live your life. Be free.
  • Choosing the Best
  • Worth the Wait 
 
To read reviews of abstinence-only-until-marriage curricula commonly used by federal grantees please visit the “Curricula and Speaker Reviews” webpage of SIECUS’ Community Action Kit at www.communityactionkit.org.
 
 
Federal Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2009[21]
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
 
 
Title V
 
CBAE
 
(Length of Grant)
 
AFLA
 
(Length of Grant)
 
Arizona Department of Health Services
 
 
 
$1,034,776[22]
 
(federal grant)
 
 
 
Americans for a
Better Tomorrow, Inc.
 
 
 
$599,601
 
(2006–2010)
 
 
Arizona–Mexico Border Health Foundation
 
 
 
$550,000
 
(2008–2013)
 
 
 
 
Arizona Youth Partnership
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Catholic Charities Community Services
 
 
 
$600,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
 
Pima Prevention Partnership
 
 
 
 
$475,000
 
(2007–2012)
 
Women’s Pregnancy Centers
 
    $599,969   (2008–2013)  
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[23]
Sheila Sjolander
Chief
Bureau of Women’s and Children’s Health
Arizona Department of Health Services
150 North 18th Avenue, Suite 320
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 364-1494
 
 
Arizona Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education
ACLU of Arizona
P.O. Box 17148
Phoenix, AZ 85011
Phone: (602) 650-1854
 
The Arizona Coalition on Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting
4710 North 16th Place
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Phone: (602) 265-4337
 
Arizona Family Planning Council
2920 North 24th Avenue, Suite 230
Phoenix, AZ 85015
Phone: (602) 258-5777
 
Equality Arizona
P.O. Box 25044
Phoenix, AZ 85002
Phone: (602) 650-0900
 
NARAL Pro-Choice Arizona
P.O. Box 16675
Phoenix, AZ 85011
(602) 258-4091
 
Planned Parenthood Arizona
5651 North 7th Street
Phoenix, AZ 85014
Phone: (602) 277-PLAN www.plannedparenthood.org/ppaz
 
Phoenix Pride
P.O. Box 16847
Phoenix, AZ 85011-6847
Phone: (602) 277-7433
Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation
375 South Euclid Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85719
Phone: (520) 628-7223
 
 
Arizona Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education
Alliance Defense Fund
15100 North 90th Street
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: (800) TELL-ADF
 
The Center for Arizona Policy
7227 North 16th Street, Suite 250
Phoenix, AZ 85020
Phone: (602) 424-2525 
 
  
Goldwater Institute
500 East Coronado Road
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Phone: (602) 462-5000
 
 
 
Newspapers in Arizona[24]
Arizona Daily Star
Newsroom
4850 South Park Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85714
Phone: (520) 806-7754
 
Arizona Daily Sun
Newsroom
1751 South Thompson Street
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Phone: (928) 556-2241
The Arizona Republic
Newsoom
200 East Van Buren Street
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Phone: (602) 444-8000
 
East Valley Tribune
Newsroom
120 West First Avenue
Mesa, AZ 85210
Phone: (480) 898-6554
Tucson Citizen
Newsroom
4850 South Park Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85714
Phone: (520) 573-4561
 
 
 
 Political Blogs in Arizona
Arizona B.S. Meter
 
AZNetroots
Blog for Arizona
 
Democratic Diva
 
LiberalDesert
 
 


[1] Ariz. Rev. Stat. §§ 15-716(C)(1)–(3), <http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/15/00716.htm>.
[3] Ibid.
[4] Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 59, no. SS-5 (4 June 2010): 98–109, accessed 4 June 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss5905.pdf>. Arizona did not participate in the full 2009 YRBS. 
[5] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, (Washington, DC: Guttmacher Institute, January 2010), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf>, Table 3.1.
[6] Ibid., Table 3.2.
[7] Joyce A. Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” National Vital Statistics Reports, vol. 57, number 7 (Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 7 January 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr57/nvsr57_07.pdf>, Table B.
[8] .U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity, Table 3.2.
[9] Martin, et. al, “Births: Final Data for 2006,” 4.
[10] Ibid., Table B.
[11] U.S. Teenage Pregnancies, Births, and Abortions: National and State Trends and Trends by Race and Ethnicity.
[12] “Cases of HIV Infection and AIDS in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2007,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, vol. 19, (Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, February 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/2007SurveillanceReport.pdf> , Table 18.
[13] Slide 6: “Estimated Numbers of HIV/AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—34 States,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.
[14] Ibid.; “AIDS Case Rate per 100,000 Population, All Ages, 2007,” (Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparetable.jsp?ind=513&cat=11&sub=120&yr=62&typ=1&sort=a>.
[15] Ibid., Table 16.
[16] Slide 15: “Reported AIDS Cases among Adolescents 13 to 19 Years of Age, 2007—United States and Dependent Areas,” HIV/AIDS Surveillance in Adolescents and Young Adults (through 2007), (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, May 2009), accessed 25 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/slides/adolescents/index.htm>.  
[17] “Wonder Database: Selected STDs by Age, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender, 1996-2008 Results,” (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 30 June 2009, accessed 5 March 2010, <http://wonder.cdc.gov/>; see also Table 10: “Chlamydia: Reported Cases and Rates Per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of STD Prevention, November 2009), accessed 5 March 2010, <http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats08/surv2008-Complete.pdf>, 95.
[18] Ibid; see also Table 20: “Gonorrhea—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008,106.
[19] Ibid; see also Table 33: “Primary and Secondary Syphilis—Reported Cases and Rates per 100,000 Population by Age Group and Sex: United States, 2004–2008,” Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance 2008, 121.
[20] This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1st and ends on September 30th. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2009 began on October 1, 2008 and ended on September 30, 2009.
[21] Through the Fiscal Year 2010 appropriations process, Congress eliminated all discretionary funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, including the entire CBAE program and the abstinence-only-until-marriage portion of AFLA. The grant years listed in the chart reflect the years for which funding was originally approved; however, the grants effectively ended in Fiscal Year 2009. 
[22] Arizona was awarded approximately this amount of funding but returned the complete award to the federal government.
[23] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[24] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

 

National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education