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South Carolina State Profile Fiscal Year 2008

The Department of Health and Environmental Control and community-based organizations in South Carolina received $3,151,558 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2008.[1]

(Click Here to View a PDF Version of this Profile)

 
South Carolina Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Schools in South Carolina are required to teach sexuality education as well as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) education. Schools are not required to teach about HIV or AIDS. State law specifies that:
 
      In grades 6 through 8 sexually transmitted diseases are to be included as a part of instruction. And, at least one time during the four years of grades 9–12, each student shall receive at least 750 minutes of reproductive health education and pregnancy prevention education.
 
According to the law:

Reproductive health education means instruction in human physiology, conception, prenatal care and development, childbirth, and postnatal care, but does not include instruction concerning sexual practices outside marriage or practices unrelated to reproduction except within the context of the risk of disease. Abstinence and the risks associated with sexual activity outside of marriage must be strongly emphasized.

 
The law explains, “Contraceptive information must be given in the context of future family planning,” which has been interpreted to mean that any information about contraception must be in the context of use during marriage. In addition, no school may distribute contraceptives.
The law states that abstinence-until-marriage must be stressed; pregnancy prevention can be covered and must be taught in gender-divided classes; and adoption can be discussed, but abortion cannot. Finally, it explains:
 
The program of instruction provided for in this section may not include a discussion of alternate sexual lifestyles from heterosexual relationships including, but not limited to, homosexual relationships, except in the context of instruction concerning sexually transmitted diseases.
 
The state does not require or suggest a specific curriculum. However, each local school board must “appoint a thirteen member local advisory committee consisting of two parents, three clergy, two health professionals, two teachers, two students, one being the president of the student body of a high school, and two other persons not employed by the local school district.”    
South Carolina also states that the department of education and local school boards must provide “staff development activities” for educators participating in the comprehensive health program.
Parents must be informed in advance of any sexuality specific instruction and are allowed to remove their children from any part of the health education classes. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See South Carolina Comprehensive Health Education Act Code 59-32.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Enact the Reduction of Racial Health Disparities Grant Program
House Bill 4648, the Reduction of Racial Health Disparities Act, was introduced in February 2008. The bill would have established a grant program to provide funding for community-based health projects targeting racial and ethnic minority populations. The funded programs would have served to supplement state initiatives to reduce racial disparities in health outcomes, including infant mortality, cervical and prostate cancer, HIV and AIDS, and sexually transmitted diseases. The bill passed in the House but failed to pass in the Senate.
 
Responsible Family Planning Act Introduced
House Bill 4771, known as the Responsible Family Planning Act, was introduced in February 2008. The bill would have enforced the right of consenting individuals to use safe and effective methods of contraceptive without governmental interference. The legislation verified that individuals have the right to access and obtain contraceptives without governmental “discrimination or interference in the regulation of benefits, facilities or information.” The bill was sent to the House Committee on Medical, Military, Public, and Municipal Affairs where it died.
 
Bill Aimed to Amend Discrimination Laws
Senate Bill 438, introduced in February 2007, would amend the Code of Laws of the state pertaining to discrimination by prohibiting the discrimination of an individual in employment on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Sexual orientation is defined as “an actual or perceived heterosexuality, homosexuality or bisexuality.” Gender identity is defined as “a person’s self-perception, or perception of that person by another, of the person’s identity as a male or female based upon the person’s appearance, behavior or physical characteristics that are in accord with or opposed to the person’s physical anatomy, chromosomal sex, or sex at birth.” The bill was sent to the Senate Committee on Judiciary on February 14, 2007.
 
Cervical Cancer Prevention Act Introduced
House Bill 3136, also known as the Cervical Cancer Prevention Act, was introduced in December 2006. The bill would have required, beginning in the 2009–2010 school year, female students aged 11 enrolling in the seventh grade to have received the Human Papillomavirus vaccine series. Students may be exempt for religious reasons. The bill was tabled on the House floor on April 18, 2007 and died.
 
   
 
South Carolina’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[2] 
·        In 2007, 49% of female high school students and 55% of male high school students in South Carolina reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 6% of female high school students and 14% of male high school students in South Carolina reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students nationwide.
·
·        In 2007, 15% of female high school students and 21% of male high school students in South Carolina reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 37% of female high school students and 35% of male high school students in South Carolina reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 57% of females and 68% of males in South Carolina reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 55% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 16% of females and 11% of males in South Carolina reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 13% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 17% of females and 21% of males in South Carolina reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 18% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 87% of high school students in South Carolina reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 90% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
·        The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) received $751,961 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2008.
·        The Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups.
·        The South Carolina DHEC controls the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds and sub-grantees make the match through in-kind goods and services. 
·        There are two sub-grantees in South Carolina: Heritage Community Services and South Carolina Parents Involved in Education (SC PIE).
 
 
Heritage Community Services, $450,000 (2008) and $600,000 (CBAE 20062011)
Heritage Community Services is a Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantee and also receives a CBAE grant. The organization offers extensive abstinence-only-until-marriage programs within South Carolina, but has also expanded throughout the United States, with affiliated Heritage organizations in Kentucky and Rhode Island.[3]
Heritage Community Services was first formed in 1995 by Anne Badgley, who remains the president and CEO. Badgley formed the group as an adjunct to the Lowcountry Crisis Pregnancy Center which she founded in 1986 and continues to run. Crisis pregnancy centers typically advertise as providing medical services and then use anti-abortion propaganda, misinformation, and fear and shame tactics to dissuade women facing unintended pregnancy from exercising their right to choose.
While the two groups have since become separate non-profits, they remain closely linked, sharing the same office as well as some staff members. In addition, Badgley has close ties with other crisis pregnancy centers and serves on the National CareNet Centers for Tomorrow Advisory Board. According to its website, CareNet’s mission is “to promote a culture of life through the delivery of valuable, life-affirming, evangelistic ministry to people facing unplanned pregnancies and related sexual issues.” [4]
Over the years, Heritage Community Services has seen a great deal of favoritism from the government in South Carolina. In a highly irregular use of Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding, South Carolina awarded the entire amount of its federal and state funding to Heritage Community Services without first engaging in a competitive bidding process in the first years of the program.
The vast amounts of taxpayer funding and political favoritism lavished upon Heritage Community Services, both at the state and federal level, has enabled its program to break out beyond the state’s borders. In its Fiscal Year 2009 application to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), which oversees the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program, SCDHEC reported that Heritage received: one CBAE grant, three Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grants (in two states), two AFLA grants, five Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) grants in South Carolina, and one ACF demonstration grant.[5] 
According to Heritage Community Services, its materials are now being utilized in schools in Augusta, GA; Lexington, KY; Florida; Maine; Massachusetts; North Carolina; Rhode Island; and the Caribbean.[6] A fact sheet from the organization explains that there are additional communities interested in setting up programs in Arizona, California, Delaware, Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Africa.[7]
The organization has created several curricula used for abstinence-only-until-marriage-programs including Heritage Keepers Abstinence Education and Heritage Keepers Life Skills Education. SIECUS reviewed Heritage Keepers, Abstinence Education I and found that itcontains very little information about important topics in human sexuality such as puberty, anatomy, and sexual behavior. Even topics that are frequently discussed in detail in other abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, such as condoms and STDs, receive very little mention. Instead, the curriculum devotes most of its lessons to the importance of marriage and abstinence before marriage. It relies on messages of fear and shame and promotes biased views of gender, marriage, and pregnancy options. For example, the curriculum tells students, “Males are more sight orientated whereas females are more touch orientated. This is why girls need to be careful with what they wear, because males are looking! The girl might be thinking fashion, while the boy is thinking sex. For this reason, girls have a responsibility to wear modest clothing that doesn’t invite lustful thoughts.”[8]
One article on the “Teen Pulse” section of Heritage Community Service’s website advises young people, “What many people don’t realize is that those who abstain from sexual activity outside of marriage are protecting themselves physically, financially, and emotionally by waiting until someone loves them enough to make a real commitment to them and to their future children.”[9]
DHEC requires any organization receiving Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds to guarantee medical accuracy of its curriculum. Heritage Community Services uses the Medical Institute for this verification.[10] The Medical Institute (formerly the Medical Institute for Sexual Health) describes itself as a “medical, educational, and research organization” founded “to confront the global epidemics of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).”[11] It is a national organization that provides assistance to abstinence-only-until-marriage educators and providers. The Medical Institute was founded in 1992 by Joe McIlhaney, a Texas physician with close ties to the Bush administration. The organization receives federal grants from a number of different government agencies, and its staff and board members have held seats on high-level advisory panels in the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the President’s Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA).
  
South Carolina Parents Involved in Education (SC PIE), $150,000 (2008)
SC PIE is run by Sheri Few, who helped direct South Carolina’s Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage programming for the first years of its existence. Ms. Few also co-authored the abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum, Healthy Image of Sex (HIS). (See the CBAE and AFLA section for more information on HIS.)    
SC PIE has a subcontract with South Carolina CBAE grantee Life Support, Inc. The organization explains the collaboration by saying, “A subcontract with Life Support Inc. provides concentrated efforts in the African American faith community of the targeted school districts. At least 42 churches in these communities are training their clergy, lay leaders, and parents to implement the Healthy Image of Sex curriculum, specifically designed for this target population.”[12]
SC PIE uses the Abstinence Clearinghouse to guarantee medical accuracy for DHEC requirements. The Abstinence Clearinghouse was founded by Leslee Unruh. Unruh is also the president and founder of the Alpha Center, a crisis pregnancy center, which is housed at the same location as the Abstinence Clearinghouse.[13]
 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees 
· There are four CBAE grantees in South Carolina: Clarendon School District Two; Heritage Community Services; Life Support, Inc.; and Palmetto Family Council. 
· There are two AFLA grantees in South Carolina: The Children’s Council and Medical University of South Carolina.
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of CBAE and AFLA funding in the South Carolina:
Clarendon School District Two, $600,000 (CBAE 2007–2012)
The Clarendon Abstinence Education Initiative targets students in grades six through 12 using the popular curriculum, Worth the Wait.[14] The initiative’s director, Tonia Mallet Smith, is a former employee of Heritage Community Services.[15] SIECUS reviewed Worth the Wait and found that it covers some important topics related to sexuality such as puberty, anatomy, and sexual abuse, and that the curriculum is based on reliable sources of data. Despite these strengths, Worth the Wait relies on messages of fear, discourages contraceptive use, and promotes biased views of gender, marriage, and pregnancy options. For example, the curriculum explains, “teenage sexual activity can create a multitude of medical, legal, and economic problems not only for the individuals having sex but for society as a whole.”[16]
The initiative includes youth rallies, a youth drama group, and collaborations with the faith community.[17] The faith-based component receives a substantial sub-grant from fellow CBAE grantee Life Support, Inc. to provide training to churches and faith-leaders. Life Support, Inc. subsequently receives a substantial sub-grant from SC PIE. Life Support, Inc. also hosted a community conference for the faith community, parents, and the community at large in Clarendon County. Materials from the Medical Institute were central to this conference. And, the district has included money in its budget to send representatives to both the annual Medical Institute and Abstinence Clearinghouse conferences.[18] (See the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage section for more information on the Medical Institute and the Abstinence Clearinghouse.)
 
Life Support, Inc., $599,597 (CBAE 2007–2012)
Life Support describes itself as, “An organization founded by an African American woman who understands the particular problem in the African American community with sexual activity among adolescents.”[19] Elizabeth Lang-Arthur, the president of Life Support, is a former employee of Heritage Community Services.[20] The organization’s first tax return was filed for Fiscal Year 2006. In Fiscal Year 2007, Life Support’s entire budget was funded through CBAE funding, including a direct grant from HHS and a sub-grant of $150,000 from SC PIE.[21]
The organization uses the locally-created curriculum Healthy Image of Sex (HIS) in its abstinence-only-until-marriage programming and supplements it with Worth the Wait [22]  The authors of HIS produced two versions of the curriculum. Version I is intended for an African- American audience, and the authors explain in the curriculum summary that “curriculum images and particular lessons are approached from this cultural perspective” [23] Version II is intended for an “ethnically diverse audience.” SIECUS reviewed both versions and found surprisingly few differences. Moreover, those differences that we did find were quite small. For example, a story told on page 27 of the Teacher’s Manual in Version I begins, “A wise old, Black man, if he was in this class right now, would say….” The same story is told on page 27 of Version II and starts simply, “A wise old man, if he was in this class right now, would say….” In fact, the authors did not even change the curriculum summary between versions which means that both are described within the Teacher’s Manual as being “specifically for predominantly African American audiences” and “best taught by an African American teacher.”[24]
One part of the HIS teacher guide instructs:
 
Ask students to consider what happens when these powerful things are used in healthy and unhealthy ways. Plane—consider Twin Towers; Cars—consider when used by children under age or people on drugs; Guns—when used by people who are not trained or do not have authority, or for play by children; Fire—when played with or when not in a safe place. Like many things with potential great benefits, sex can be damaging as well. Marriage is the safe place, outside of marriage is dangerous.[25]
 
Life Support also sub-contacts SC PIE, a Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantee, to implement its public school activities. These schools only receive the Worth the Wait curriculum. In addition to its collaboration in schools, the organizations work together to educate public and private health care providers and with African-American churches. [26] Life Support provides these churches with stipends for participation. [27]
The organization’s budget also includes a stipend for a SC PIE representative to travel to the annual Medical Institute and Abstinence Clearinghouse conferences.[28] (See the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage section for more information on the Abstinence Clearinghouse.)
 
Palmetto Family Council, $600,000 (CBAE 2008–2013)
The Palmetto Family Council describes itself as, “A non-profit, faith-based educational foundation committed to defending and strengthening South Carolina families. Primary issues of concern to the Council include life-long committed marriage, the relationship between parent and child, sexual responsibility in youth and adults, the definition of marriage, life issues, legal issues and public and private gaming.”[29] Once the organization received its first CBAE grant, its overall budget increased by 43 percent.[30] 
Palmetto Family Council “operates in association with Focus on the Family and Family Research Council.” [31] The organization includes a statement from Dr. James Dobson on its website: “We are very appreciative of the Family Policy Councils (FPCs). These independent, state-based organizations have become powerful forces for the values and moral principles that matter most. Their influence is evident in state capitols, in the media, and in grassroots lobbying among the citizenry.” [32] Led by Dobson, Focus on the Family promotes marriage and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. Its mission reads, “To cooperate with the Holy Spirit in sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ with as many people as possible by nurturing and defending the God-ordained institution of the family and promoting biblical truths worldwide.” [33] Focus on the Family is a long-time opponent of comprehensive sexuality education. Similarly, the Family Research Council is a right-wing organization that was, “Founded in 1983 as an organization dedicated to the promotion of marriage and family and the sanctity of human life in national policy.” [34]
Palmetto Family Council provides a variety of anti-abortion and pro-marriage articles on its website, many backed up by Biblical references.[35] One article on abortion concludes, “Failing to recognize the image of God in the fertilized ovum results from a backward future orientation. A perspective beginning with [sic] adult human being and his abilities and looking back from the future on the embryo obscures the image of God in the embryo.”[36]   
The organization also addresses homosexuality in an article titled, “Why Homosexuality Falls Short of the Ideal,” which reads:
 
Homosexuality, like any other practice of sexuality outside of marriage, should be condemned for two reasons. First, at one level, it falls short of God’s intended ideal as we discussed in the previous essay. Therefore the experience will be, at best, diminished. At worst, it can be physically, spiritually or emotionally damaging. Second, homosexual sex, like other sin, is a bold attempt to dethrone God. The willful practice of sin says to God, ”I am in control and I know what is best for me, regardless of what you say.” Of course, this very attitude was at the root of Adam and Eve’s sin and Satan initiated the thought.[37]
 
It is unclear what activities the Palmetto Family Council conducts with its abstinence-only-until-marriage grant.
 
 
Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2008
 
Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
Length of Grant
Amount of Grant
Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)
South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
 
$751,961 federal
 
Title V
Heritage Community Services
$450,000
Title V sub-grantee
DUAL GRANTEE
2006–2011
$600,000
CBAE
South Carolina Parents Involved in Education (SC PIE)
$150,000
Title V sub-grantee
 
Clarendon School District Two
2007–2012
$600,000
CBAE
Life Support, Inc.
2007–2012
$599,597
CBAE
Palmetto Family Council
2008–2013
$600,000
 
CBAE
 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[38]
Owens Goff
South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health
Mills/Jarrett Complex
1751 Calhoun Street
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: (803) 545-4483  
 
 
South Carolina Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

ACLU of South Carolina
2712 Middleburg Drive, Suite 104
Columbia, SC 29204
Phone: (803) 799-5151
 
New Morning Foundation
P.O. Box 11531
Columbia, SC 29211
Phone: (803) 929-0088
South Carolina Campaign to Prevent
Teen Pregnancy
1331 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 140
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: (803) 771-7700
 
 

       
South Carolina Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Heritage Community Services
2810 Ashley Phosphate Road, Suite B-9
Charleston, SC 29418
Phone: (843) 863-0508, ext. 119
 
SC Parents Involved in Education
PO Box 819
Lugoff, SC 29078
Phone: (8093) 408-0860
 
Palmetto Family Council
P.O. Box 11953
Columbia, SC 29211
Phone: (803)733-5600
 

       
Newspapers in South Carolina[39]

Charleston City Paper
Newsroom
1049 B Morrison Drive
Charleston, SC 29403
Phone: (843) 577-5304
 
Free Times
Newsroom
6904 Main Street #108
Columbia, SC 29203
Phone: (803) 765-0707
The Greenville News
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1688
Greenville, SC 29602
Phone: (864) 298-4100
 
The Post and Courier
Newsroom
134 Columbus Street
Charleston, SC 29403
Phone: (843) 577-7111
Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Newsroom
189 W. Main Street
Spartanburg, SC 29306
Phone: (864) 562-7218
 
The State
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1333
Columbia, SC 29202
Phone: (803) 771-8380
The Sun News
Newsroom
914 Frontage Road E
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577
Phone: (843) 626-8555
 

 
 


[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2008 began on October 1, 2007 and ended on September 30, 2008.  
[2] Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2007,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57.SS-4 (6 June 2008), accessed 4 June 2008, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>.
[3] Heritage of Rhode Island closed its doors in December of 2007 after its federal abstinence-only-until-marriage grant was not renewed. See the Rhode Island state profile for more information.
[4] Our Mission, CareNet Website, accessed 14 July 2008, <http://www.care-net.org/aboutus/mission.php>.
[5] DHEC Application to Administration for Children and Families, FY09-2013, 2008, p. 28.
[6] Heritage Community Services Conference Brochure, “Family Formation: A New Generation of Leadership, July 13-14, 2004.”
[7] Ibid.
[8] Anne Badgley and Carrie Musselman, Heritage Keepers Student Manual (Charleston, SC: Heritage Community Services, 1999). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of Heritage Keepers at
[9] “Teen Pulse: Secondary Virginity,” Heritage Community Services, (2005–2006), accessed 4 April 2008, <http://heritageservices.org/secondaryvirginity.html>.
[10] DHEC Application to Administration for Children and Families, FY09-2013, 2008, p. B. 95.
[11] “About Us: What is the Medical Institute?” Medical Institute for Sexual Health, (2007), accessed 4 April 2008, <http://www.medinstitute.org/content.php?name=aboutmi>.
[12] “Abstinence,” South Carolina Parents Involved in Abstinence Education, (1999–2006), accessed 4 April 2008 <http://www.scpie.org/abstinence/GrantProjects.html>.
[13] “CREW Files IRS Complaint Against Anti-Choice Abstinence-only Orgs—Alpha Center and National Abstinence Clearinghouse,” Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, Press Release published 26 July 2006, accessed 13 February 2007, <http://www.citizensforethics.org/press/newsrelease.php?view=141>.
[14] Clarendon School District, Application to the ACF, 2006, p. 10.
[15] Ibid., p. 24.
[16] Patricia Sulak, Worth the Wait (Temple, TX: Scott & White Memorial Hospital, 2003). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of Worth the Wait at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
[17] Clarendon School District, Application to the ACF, 2006, p. 13.
[18] Ibid., Budget, p.27c.
[19] Life Support Inc., Application to the ACF, 2006, p. 8.
[20] Ibid., p. 23.
[21] Life Support, Inc., 990 Form, Fiscal Year 2006, p. 1.
[22] Life Support Inc., Application to the ACF, 2006, p. 9.
[23] Pamela L. Jones and Sheri Few, Health Images of Sex (HIS) Version I, (Lugoff, SC: Healthy Image of Sex, 2008), HIS, Teacher’s Manual Curriculum Summary, unnumbered pages. For more information, see SIECUS’ review of HIS at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.ViewPage&PageID=1007>.  
[24] HIS, Teacher’s Manual, Curriculum Summary, unnumbered pages.
[25] Pamela L. Jones and Sheri Few, Health Images of Sex (HIS) Version I, (Lugoff, SC: Healthy Image of Sex, 2008), p. 9. For more information, see SIECUS’ review of HIS at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.ViewPage&PageID=1007>. 
[26] Life Support Inc., Application to the ACF, 2006, p. 12.
[27] Ibid., p. 32. 
[28] Ibid., p. 28. 
[29] “Our Mission,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/mission.asp>.
[30] Palmetto Family Council, 990, Fiscal Year 2007, p. 1.
[31] “Our Mission,” Palmetto Family Council.
[32] “Our Endorsements,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/endorsements.asp>.
[33] “About Focus on the Family,” Focus on the Family, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.focusonthefamily.com/about_us.aspx>.
[34] “About FRC,” Family Research Council, accessed 15 October 2008, <http://www.frc.org/about-frc>.
[35] “Research by Issue: Bioethical Issues,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/showarticles.asp?Topic=Bioethical>; “Research by Issue: Marriage,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/showarticles.asp?Topic=Marriage>.
[36] “Ensoulment and the Sacredness of Human Life,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/viewarticle.asp?ID=2>.
[37] “Why Homosexuality Falls Short of the Ideal,” Palmetto Family Council, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.palmettofamily.org/viewarticle.asp?ID=37>.
[38] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[39] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.
National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education