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Nebraska State Profile Fiscal Year 2008

The Department of Health and Human Services and community-based organizations in Nebraska received $2,372,258 in federal funds for abstinence only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2008.[1]

(Click Here to View a PDF Version of this Profile)

 
Nebraska Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Nebraska law does not require sexuality education; indeed, it explicitly states that this is a matter of local control. Nebraska does not limit or prescribe what can be taught in such classes nor does it recommend a specific curriculum. However, in its Nebraska Health Education Frameworks, the Nebraska State Board of Education does support “an abstinence approach to risk behaviors associated with…sexual activity.” The state board of education also adopted specific abstinence guidelines to be used in any school unit involving family life or sexuality education. The guidelines include teaching that “abstinence from sexual activity outside marriage is the expected standard for all school-age children,” and “a mutually faithful monogamous relationship in the context of marriage is the expected standard of human sexual activity.” The guidelines also note that the best way to develop family life or sexuality education units is for parents, school boards, and teachers to work together with schools, districts, and communities “so all have a voice in the process and content.”
Nebraska does not require parental permission for students to participate in sexuality or HIV/AIDS education nor does it say whether parents or guardians may remove their children from such classes.

See the Nebraska Revised Statutes Chapter 79, and Nebraska Health Education Frameworks.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Amend Discrimination Laws
Bill 475, introduced in January 2007, would have amended the discrimination laws in the state to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or marital status. The bill was indefinitely postponed on May 22, 2007 and died.
 
 
Nebraska’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[2]
·        In 2005, 41% of female high school students and 41% of male high school students in Nebraska reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 48% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, 3% of female high school students and 6% of male high school students in Nebraska reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, 12% of female high school students and 12% of male high school students in Nebraska reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 17% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, 30% of female high school students and 30% of male high school students in Nebraska reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 35% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 56% of females and 67% of males in Nebraska reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 56% of females and 70% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 25% of females and 19% of males in Nebraska reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 21% of females and 15% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 23% of females and 26% of males in Nebraska reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2005, 85% of high school students in Nebraska reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 88% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
·        Nebraska received $218,740 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2008.
·        The Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups.
·        In Nebraska, the match is provided through in-kind contributions. 
·        In Fiscal Year 2007, Nebraska’s Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds supported nine sub-grantees, including community-based organizations, crisis pregnancy centers, and local health departments. However, in Fiscal Year 2008 the state did not spend the funding this way. Instead, the state ran a limited media campaign and sponsored community mobilization events around the state. 
 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees
·        There are three CBAE grantees in Nebraska: City of Norfolk/Community Character Development Coalition, Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home, and Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska.
·        There is one ALFA grantee in Nebraska: Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home
 
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of CBAE and AFLA funding in Nebraska:
City of Norfolk/Community Character Development Coalition, $438,198 (CBAE 2005–2008) and $469,860 (CBAE 2008–2013)
The Community Character Development Coalition (CCDC) is run by the City of Norfolk and supports a variety of youth development programs.[3] The “No More Excuses” section of the coalition’s website lists several reasons that visitors should save sex for marriage. One reason is: “Emotional Wellbeing: Teens who are not sexually active have a higher self esteem, and are less likely to struggle with emotions like anger, guilt, shame, regret, and depression than teens who are sexually active.”[4] Another reason is: “Better Sex: Studies show that happily married people have the best sex. Because there is so much trust and commitment in the relationship, married people are able to just relax and have fun. Plus if you wait, you don’t have to deal with the mental images that come to mind because of other partners (your brain really does record mental images of every sexual encounter).”[5]    
In the “Resources” section of the website, the CCDC refers visitors to Focus on the Family.[6] Led by James Dobson, Focus on the Family is a long-time opponent of comprehensive sexuality education. Its mission reads, “To cooperate with the Holy Spirit in sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ with as many people as possible by nurturing and defending the God-ordained institution of the family and promoting biblical truths worldwide.”[7]
       

Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2008

Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
Length of Grant
Amount of Grant
Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
 
$218,740 federal
Title V
City of Norfolk/Community Character Development Coalition
2005–2008
$438,198
 
CBAE
 
DUAL GRANTEE
 
2008–2013
$469, 860
 
 
 
CBAE
Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska
2008–2013
$395,460
CBAE
Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home
2008–2013
DUAL GRANTEE
2007–2012
$550,000
 
$300,000
CBAE
 
AFLA

 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[8]
Linda Henningsen
Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services
P.O. Box 95044
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: (402) 471-0538
 
 
Nebraska Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

ACLU of Nebraska
941 O Street, Suite 706
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 476-8091
 
Nebraska Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
P.O. Box 31395
Omaha, NE 68131
Phone: (402) 320-0070
 
Planned Parenthood of Nebraska and
Council Bluffs
2246 O Street
Lincoln, NE 68510
Phone: (402) 441-3332
 
 

 
Nebraska Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Family First
610 J Street, Suite 10
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 435-3210
Nebraska Right to Life Committee
P.O. Box 80410
Lincoln, NE 68501
Phone: (402) 438-4802
 
 

  
Newspapers in Nebraska[9]

Columbus Telegram
Newsroom
1254 27th Avenue
Columbus, NE 68601
Phone: (402) 564-2741
www.columbustelegram.com
 
Hastings Tribune
Newsroom
912 W. 2nd Street
Hastings, NE 68901
Phone: (402) 462-2131
Lincoln Journal Star
Newsroom
926 P Street
Lincoln, NE 68508
Phone: (402) 473-7150
 
North Platte Telegraph
Newsroom
P.O. Box 370
North Platte, NE 69101
Phone: (308) 532-6000
Omaha World-Herald
Newsroom
Omaha World-Herald Building
Omaha, NE 68102
Phone: (402) 444-1000
 

 
 


[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2008 began on October 1, 2007 and ended on September 30, 2008. 
[2] Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2005,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 55, no. SS-5 (9 June 2006): 1-108, accessed 26 January 2007, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>. Note: Nebraska did not participate in the 2007 YRBS. 
[3] “What’s CCDC?,” Community Character Development Coalition, accessed 12 September 2008, <http://www.youreaboveit.com/ccdc/>.
[4] “Why Wait?,” Community Character Development Coalition, accessed 12 September 2008, <http://www.youreaboveit.com/wait/>.
[5] Ibid. 
[6] “Resources,” Community Character Development Coalition, accessed 12 September 2008,
[7] “About Focus on the Family,” Focus on the Family, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.focusonthefamily.com/about_us.aspx>.
[8] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[9] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community.  SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.
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