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Missouri State Profile Fiscal Year 2008

 The Department of Health and Senior Services and community-based organizations in Missouri received $5,433,732 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2008.[1]

 
Missouri Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Missouri law mandates that all instruction in human sexuality must be medically and factually accurate, but may also be presented in a manner consistent with federal abstinence law. It must also:
 
[P]resent abstinence from sexual activity as the preferred choice of behavior in relation to all sexual activity for unmarried pupils because it is the only method that is one hundred percent effective in preventing pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases [STDs] and the emotional trauma associated with adolescent sexual activity, and advise students that teenage sexual activity places them at a higher risk of dropping out of school because of the consequences of sexually transmitted diseases and unplanned pregnancy.
 
Students must be instructed not to make unwanted physical and verbal sexual advances or otherwise exploit another person. Missouri students must also be presented “both the possible side effects and health benefits of all forms of contraception, including the success and failure rates for the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.”
School districts and charter schools are prohibited from providing abortion services and from allowing a person and/or entity that provides abortion services to offer, sponsor, or furnish course materials related to human sexuality and STDs.
Although school districts are not required to follow it, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education produced the Missouri Framework for Curriculum Development in Health Education and Physical Education. The Framework includes instructional guidelines for HIV/AIDS- and STD-prevention education starting at the high school level. School boards must determine the specific content of sexuality education classes and make sure that it is age-appropriate.
The school district must also notify parents and guardians about:
 
·        the basic content of the district’s human sexuality instruction to be provided to the student; and
·        the parent’s right to remove the student from any part of the district’s human sexuality instruction.
 
This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy.
 
See Missouri Revised Statute 170.015, Missouri School Improvement Program, Missouri’s HIV Prevention Education Program, Missouri House Bill 1055, Sexual Education and Abortions,and Missouri Framework for Curriculum Development in Health Education and Physical Education.[2]
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Require Sexuality Education to Follow Federal Abstinence Education Law
House Bill 63, introduced in January 2007 and referred to the Special Committee on Family Services, would have changed Missouri’s law from explicitly requiring schools to teach “the latest medically factual information” about contraception to requiring that students are presented with “information on contraceptives, pregnancy and abortion, in a manner consistent with the provisions of the Federal Abstinence Education Law.” It would have also banned from schools outside sexuality educators and any materials produced by a facility or organization that provides abortion services or referrals. In addition, the law would have created an opt-in policy under which schools would have to receive written permission from parents before their children could attend a course related to human sexuality. Finally, HB 63 would have required schools to “present the benefits to individuals, families, and society of a lifelong monogamous marriage between a man and a woman,” and present information on fetal development including telling students that “at fertilization an unborn child’s life begin” and that the “unborn child has growth and development of various body organs and limbs, fingerprints, and sensory awareness long before birth.” The bill failed to move out of committee and died.
 
 
Missouri’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[3]
·        In 2007, 53% of female high school students and 51% of male high school students in Missouri reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 3% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students in Missouri reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students nationwide.
·
·        In 2007, 12% of female high school students and 19% of male high school students in Missouri reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 44% of female high school students and 37% of male high school students in Missouri reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 54% of females and 66% of males in Missouri reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 55% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 23% of females and 14% of males in Missouri reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 13% of males nationwide.
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 17% of females and 28% of males in Missouri reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 18% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 88% of high school students in Missouri reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 90% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
·        Missouri received $885,593 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2008.
·        The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups.
·        In Missouri, sub-grantees are required to make the match through a combination of in-kind services and direct funding.
·        The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services manages the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage federal grant and distributes the funds to sub-grantees.
·        Missouri has nine Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantees: one school district, two community-based organization (including one faith-based), two crisis pregnancy centers, and four public health centers.
 
The Missouri Abstinence Education Program manages the state’s competitive grant application process for Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding. The agency requires that grantees provide abstinence program services to young adolescents (ages 12–15) and their parents. Sub-grantees must offer one or more of the following programs:
 
  • Curriculum-based abstinence-only-until-marriage programs for middle school students that include lessons on communication skills in order to discuss topics with their parents and families.
  • Youth development abstinence education programs for youth ages 12–14 that use the Teen Outreach Program model, which includes at least 20 hours of community service. Participants must also receive one abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum.
  • Parent-adolescent abstinence programs for parents who want to improve their communication and connectedness with their adolescent children by supporting their decision to remain abstinent.[4]
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Missouri:
The Community Abstinence Program, Inc., $92,000 (2008)
The Community Abstinence Program uses curricula developed by Choosing the Best for its abstinence-only-until-marriage program. The Choosing the Best series is one of the more popular abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the country. The series is comprised of a number of curricula for students from sixth grade through high school: Choosing the Best WAY, Choosing the Best PATH, Choosing the Best LIFE, Choosing the Best JOURNEY, and Choosing the Best SOULMATE. The series has been recently revised and the information about STDs is now medically accurate. However, Choosing the Best curricula continue to promote heterosexual marriage, rely on messages of fear and shame, and include biases about gender, sexual orientation, and pregnancy options. For example, Choosing the Best PATH asks students to brainstorm the “emotional consequences” of premarital sex. Suggested answers include “guilt, feeling scared, ruined relationships, broken emotional bonds.”[5] 
 
Laclede County Pregnancy Support Center, $33,094 (2008)
Laclede County Pregnancy Support Center is a crisis pregnancy center (CPC). Crisis pregnancy centers typically advertise as providing medical services and then use anti-abortion propaganda, misinformation, and fear and shame tactics to dissuade women facing unintended pregnancy from exercising their right to choose.
      The organization has a website for teens called GravityTeen.com that provides biased information about abortion. Information on the website states, “A teenage girl is 10 times more likely to attempt suicide if she has had an abortion in the last six months, than is a comparable teenage girl who has not had an abortion.”[6] The website also includes a disturbing photograph which it claims shows the feet of a ten-week old aborted fetus. A section of the site that focuses on abstinence provides a link for teens to make a pledge to remain abstinent until marriage.
Such promises are often called virginity pledges. Research has found that 88 percent of young people who took a virginity pledge ultimately had sexual intercourse before marriage. Under certain conditions these pledges may help some adolescents delay sexual intercourse. When they work, pledges help this select group of adolescents delay the onset of sexual intercourse for an average of 18 months—far short of marriage. Researchers found that pledges only worked when taken by a small group of students. Pledges taken by a whole class were ineffective. More importantly, the studies also found that those young people who took a pledge were one-third less likely to use contraception when they did become sexually active than their peers who had not pledged. These teens are therefore more vulnerable to the risks of unprotected sexual activity such as unintended pregnancy and STDs, including HIV/AIDS. Further research has confirmed that although some students who take pledges delay intercourse, ultimately they are equally as likely to contract an STD as their non-pledging peers. The study also found that STD rates were higher in communities where a significant proportion (over 20 percent) of the young people had taken virginity pledges.[7]
The site also features testimonials from national and state beauty pageant winners who have committed to abstinence, including 2003 Miss America, Erika Harold.[8] The center’s abstinence program uses Choosing the Best curricula.
 
Life Choices Medical Clinic and Resource Center, $91,998 (2008)
Life Choices Medical Clinic and Resource Center operates crisis pregnancy centers in Missouri and Southeast Kansas. The organization’s mission statement says that it is “dedicated to upholding the dignity of life through medical services, education, and resources.”
The center’s website provides inaccurate information on abortion that names abortion as “the most preventable risk factor for breast cancer.”[9] In February 2003, the National Cancer Institute convened a group of 100 experts on pregnancy and breast cancer risk who reviewed “existing population-based, clinical, and animal studies on the relationship between pregnancy and breast cancer risk, including studies of induced and spontaneous abortion” and concluded that induced abortion is not linked to an increase in the risk of breast cancer.[10]
Life Choices’ abstinence-only-until-marriage program, “Virtuous Reality,” serves students in grades six through nine. The program uses Choosing the Best WAY curriculum for sixth grade students and the WAIT (Why Am I Tempted?) Training curriculum for students in seventh, eighth, and ninth grade.[11]
SIECUS reviewed WAIT Training and found that it contained little medical or biological information and almost no information about STDs, including HIV/AIDS. Instead, it contains information and statistics about marriage, many of which are outdated and not supported by scientific research. It also contains messages of fear and shame and biased views of gender, sexual orientation, and family type. For example, WAIT Training explains, “men sexually are like microwaves and women sexually are like crockpots….A woman is stimulated more by touch and romantic words. She is far more attracted by a man’s personality while a man is stimulated by sight. A man is usually less discriminating about those to whom he is physically attracted.”[12]
 
Pregnancy Care Center, $77,719 (2008)
The Pregnancy Care Center of Missouri is a crisis pregnancy center. In its mission statement the organization states that it “exists to glorify God by serving the physical, spiritual, and emotional needs of women, men and families in our community.”[13] The center offers free services including pregnancy testing, family and relationship counseling, LAMAZE classes, parenting skills classes, information on pregnancy and abortion, and post-abortion counseling. The center does not offer abortions or provide referrals for abortion. The center is a pro-life agency whose motto is “Offering Hope, Help & a Heart for Life.”[14]
      The center’s website does not provide information on its abstinence-only-until-marriage program. However, Pregnancy Care Center does use Choosing the Best curricula in its program.
 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees 
·        There are six CBAE grantees in Missouri: one community clinic, one county health department, one crisis pregnancy center, and three community-based organizations (including one faith-based).
·        There are no AFLA grantees in Missouri.
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of CBAE and AFLA funding in Missouri:
Better Family Life Inc., $799,500 (CBAE 2005–2008) and $599,800 (CBAE 20082013)
The Better Family Life, Inc. (BFL) organization is a community-based non-profit that provides services to African-Americans in the St. Louis metro area. The organization describes its purpose: “BFL is committed to providing quality and life enhancing services to all people, in particular low-to-moderate wealth individuals and families.”[15]
      The organization uses its abstinence funding in part to sponsor the A Better Family Life “Abstinence Superstar” youth rally. The organization partners with local faith-based organizations to host the rally, which is designed to “unite, empower and excite youth about abstinence education and healthy relationships.” Adolescents participating in the organization’s abstinence-only-until-marriage program are invited to attend the rally. The afternoon event features local speakers, faith leaders, hip hop artists, and other performers.[16]
 
ThriVe St. Louis Pregnancy Resources Center, $549,755 (CBAE 2008–2013)
ThriVe St. Louis is a crisis pregnancy center that describes itself as a “Christ-centered organization that empowers people to make life-affirming and healthy decisions about sex, pregnancy and relationships.”[17] ThriVe offers the Best Choice Sexuality Integrity Program to adolescents, which “empowers teens to live at a higher standard socially, physically, intellectually, emotionally and spiritually.” The program is presented to public and private schools, church youth groups, and Sunday school classes across St. Louis. The program offers a four-day workshop with presentations and interactive activities to equip youth “with the necessary tools to avoid the heartbreak of unplanned pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and emotional stress.”[18]
According to the organization’s website, the program has experienced a high success rate, with almost 80 percent of participants who had been sexually active anonymously stating their intention to remain abstinent until marriage after the four-day program. ThriVe attributes the success of the program to its ability to communicate to adolescents that “beyond STIs and teen pregnancy, the most destructive thing sex outside of marriage does is mess with their emotions and their ability to bond with their future spouse.” The program clearly promotes marriage and emphasizes to youth that premarital sex brings emotional consequences. As one student from Oakville High School commented after participating in the program, “The most valuable information she gave to me was that if you have sex with a lot of people before marriage, it will be harder to bond with the person you marry.” [19]
 
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City, $746,823 (CBAE 2005–2008) and $512,500 (CBAE 2008–2013)
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City (TWC) is a crisis pregnancy center and a pro-life organization. For the organization’s 2006 fiscal year, its CBAE funding accounted for 86 percent of its total annual revenue. [20] In September 2008, TWC hosted its fourth annual “Walk for Life” fundraiser. The purpose of the annual event is to “walk for the lives of the unborn and for the young moms who choose life.” [21] The organization is an affiliate of national anti-abortion and abstinence-only organizations, including CareNet and Focus on the Family. Led by James Dobson, Focus on the Family promotes marriage and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. Its mission reads, “To cooperate with the Holy Spirit in sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ with as many people as possible by nurturing and defending the God-ordained institution of the family and promoting biblical truths worldwide.”[22] Focus on the Family is a long-time opponent of comprehensive sexuality education.
      The clinic runs the “LifeGuard Youth Development” abstinence-only-until-marriage program which uses Choosing the Best curricula. The LifeGuard program also sponsors a number of youth events focused on abstinence. In May of 2008 the program hosted a free event for youth and parents to see Keith Deltano, an abstinence-only-until-marriage speaker and Christian comedian, give his presentation, “The New Sexual Revolution.” During the event Deltano also gave a presentation for parents titled, “Keeping Your Kid a Virgin 101.”[23]
Deltano is a well-known speaker and has given talks around the country in middle schools and high schools. SIECUS attended one of Mr. Deltano’s most popular presentations, “The New Sexual Revolution or Abstinence is Cool,” and found that he uses a loud, aggressive style, reminiscent of a football coach to badger students into accepting his abstinence-only-until-marriage ideology.   Deltano relies on messages of fear and shame, inaccurate and misleading information, and biased views of marriage and gender. The highlight of Deltano’s performance includes an activity designed to illustrate the ineffectiveness of condoms against HIV in which he suggests that condoms fail ten percent of the time and then dangles a cinderblock over the genitals of an unsuspecting male student yelling, “Is 10 percent good enough for you?!?!  Is it good enough?!?!”[24]
 
 
 
 
 
Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2008

Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
Length of Grant
Amount of Grant
Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)
The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
 
$885,593 federal
 
Title V
Clay County Public Health Center
$63,227
Title V sub-grantee
The Community Abstinence Program, Inc.
$92,000
Title V sub-grantee
Kansas City, MO School District
$91,833
Title V sub-grantee
Laclede County Pregnancy Support Center
$33,094
Title V sub-grantee
LifeChoices Medical Clinic & Resource Center
$91,988
Title V sub-grantee
Lutheran Family and Children’s Services
$30,476
Title V sub-grantee
People’s Health Centers
$92,000
Title V sub-grantee
Pregnancy Care Center
$77,719
Title V sub-grantee
St Louis County Department of Health
 
DUAL GRANTEE
2005-2008
$84,923
 
 
$424,279
Title V sub-grantee
 
 
CBAE
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City/LifeGuard Youth Development
2005–2008
$746,823
 
 
CBAE
 
 
 
DUAL GRANTEE
2008–2013
 $512,500
 
CBAE
About Our Kids, Inc.
2007–2012
$600,000
CBAE
Better Family Life, Inc.
2005–2008
DUAL GRANTEE
2008–2013
$799,500
 
$599,800
CBAE
 
CBAE
Catholic Charities of Kansas City/St. Joseph Children and Family Services
2005–2008
$315,482
CBAE
ThriVe St. Louis Pregnancy Resources Center
2008–2013
$549,755
CBAE

 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[25]
Patti Van Tuinen
Adolescent Health Coordinator
Bureau of Genetics and Healthy Childhood, Section of Healthy Families and Youth Division of Community and Public Health
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
P.O. Box 570
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 751-6188
 
 
Missouri Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

ACLU of Eastern Missouri
454 Whittier Street
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 652-3111
 
ACLU of Kansas and Western Missouri
3601 Main Street
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: (816) 756-3113
 
The Lesbian and Gay Community Center
207 Westport Road, Suite 218
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: (816) 931-4420
 
Missouri Religious Coalition for
Reproductive Choice
462 N. Taylor, Suite 102
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 531-5010
 
NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri
4144 Lindell Boulevard, Suite 505
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 531-8616
 
 
 
 
Planned Parenthood of Kansas and
Mid-Missouri
4401 West 109th Street, Suite 200
Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: (913) 312-5100
 
Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region
4251 Forest Park Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108
Phone: (314) 531-7526
 
Personal Rights of Missourians (PROMO)
438 North Skinker Boulevard
Saint Louis, MO 63130
Phone: (314) 862-4900
 

       
Missouri Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Eagle Forum Council
7800 Bonhomme Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63105
Phone: (314) 721-1213
 
Life’s Silver Linings
3298 Huckleberry Drive
Florissant, MO 63033
Phone: (314) 921-7762
 
Missouri Right to Life
P.O. Box 651
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 635-5110
 
The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City
815 North Noland Road, Suites 4 & 5
Independence, MO 64050
Phone: (816) 836-9000
 

       
Newspapers in Missouri[26]

Branson Daily News
Newsroom
P.O. Box 1900
Branson, MO 65615
Phone: (417) 334-3161
 
Columbia Daily Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 798
Columbia, MO 65205
Phone: (573) 815-1700
 
Daily American Republic
Newsroom
208 Poplar Street
Poplar Bluff, MO 63901
Phone: (573) 785-1414
www.darnews.com
 
Jefferson City Post-Tribune
Newsroom
P.O. Box 420
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone: (573) 636-3131
 
The Joplin Globe
Newsroom
P.O. Box 7
Joplin, MO 64802
Phone: (417) 623-3480
The Kansas City Star
Newsroom
1729 Grand Boulevard
Kansas City, MO 64108
Phone: (816) 234-4741
 
The News-Leader
Newsroom
651 Boonville Avenue
Springfield, MO 65806
Phone: (417) 836-1100
St. Joseph News-Press
Newsroom
825 Edmond Street
St. Joseph, MO 64501
Phone: (816) 271-8500
 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Newsroom
900 N. Tucker Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63101
Phone: (314) 340-8000
 
Southeast Missourian
Newsroom
P.O. Box 699
Cape Girardeau, MO 63702
Phone: (573) 335-6611
 

 
 
 


[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2008 began on October 1, 2007 and ended on September 30, 2008.  
[2] HIV Prevention Education Program (Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 23 July 2002), accessed 28 January 2005, <http://www.dese.state.mo.us/divimprove/>.
[3] Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2007,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57.SS-4 (6 June 2008), accessed 4 June 2008, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>.
[4] Personal conversation between Patti Van Tuinen and Catherine Morrison, 10 September 2008.
[5] Bruce Cook, Choosing the Best (Marietta, GA: Choosing the Best, Inc., 2001-2007).
[6] “GravityTeen.com” Laclede Pregnancy Support Center (2003–2004), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.gravityteen.com/pregnancy/pregnancy.cfm>.
[7] Peter Bearman and Hannah Brückner “Promising the Future: Virginity Pledges and the Transition to First Intercourse.” American Journal of Sociology 106.4 (2001): 859-912; Peter Bearman and Hannah Brückner, “After the promise: The STD consequences of adolescent virginity pledges,” Journal of Adolescent Health 36.4 (2005): 271-278.
[8] “Queenly Wisdom,” GravityTeen.com, Laclede Pregnancy Support Center (2003-2004), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.gravityteen.com/abstinence/queen.cfm>.
[9] “Abortion-Breast Cancer Link,” Life Choices Medical Clinic and Resource Center (2000-2006), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.lifechoices4states.org/breastcancerabortionlink.htm>.
[10] National Cancer Institute, “Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk,” 30 May 2003, accessed 30 January 2007, <http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/abortion-miscarriage>.
[11] “Program Outlines,” Virtuous Reality, Life Choices Medical Clinic and Resource Center (2000-2006), <http://www.connectioninstitute.com/curricula%20abstracts.htm>.
[12]  Joneen Krauth-Mackenzie, WAIT (Why Am I Tempted) Training, Second Edition (Greenwood Village, CO: WAIT Training, undated).  For more information, see SIECUS’ review of WAIT Training at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
[13] “Pregnancy Care Center MO,” Pregnancy Care Center of Missouri, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.pregnancycarecentermo.com/>.
[14] “Frequently Asked Questions,” Pregnancy Care Center of Missouri, accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.pregnancycarecentermo.com/faqs.html>.
[15] “What is Better Family Life?” Better Family Life, Inc. (2006), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.betterfamilylife.org/>.
[16] “Community Based Abstinence Education,” Better Family Life, Inc. (2006), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.betterfamilylife.org/yf_cbae.htm>.
[17] “About Us,” ThriVe St. Louis Pregnancy Resources Center (2008), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://thrivestlouis.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=48&Itemid=44>.
[18] “Best Choice Sexuality Integrity Program,” ThriVe St. Louis Pregnancy Resources Center (2008), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://thrivestlouis.org/index.php?>.
[19] Ibid.
[20] The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City, IRS Form 990, submitted 19 November 2007, accessed 18 October 2008.
[21] The Women’s Clinic of Kansas City (2008), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.thewomensclinic.net/docs/WFL2008Flyer.pdf>.
[22] “About Focus on the Family,” Focus on the Family, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.focusonthefamily.com/about_us.aspx>.
[23] “LifeGuard Youth Development” newsletter, vol. 1, issue 6, LifeGuard Youth Development (2005-2008), accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.guardyourself.org/>.
[24] SIECUS’ review is based an hour long version of “The New Sexual Revolution”  which SIECUS staff attended at a public high school in Loudoun County, Virginia in February 2007 as well as information from Deltano’s website and newspaper articles about his other appearances.  
[25] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[26] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.
National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education