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Kansas State Profile Fiscal Year 2008

The Department of Health and Environment and community-based organizations in Kansas received $2,360,378 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2008.[1]

(Click Here to View a PDF Version of this Profile)

 
Kansas Sexuality Education Law and Policy
The Kansas Administrative Regulations require elementary and secondary students to be taught “physical education, which shall include instruction in health and human sexuality.” Kansas does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum; however, the Kansas State Board of Education can suggest guidelines and limitations.
The Kansas Health Education Standards require that each local board of education provide “a complete program of abstinence until marriage in human sexuality that is developmentally appropriate, including information about sexually transmitted diseases, especially HIV/AIDS.” The Standards also state that this program must be medically accurate and research-based, and must “include factual information regarding contraception and disease prevention.”
Kansas law does not require parental permission for students to participate in sexuality or HIV/AIDS education nor does it say whether parents or guardians may remove their children from such classes.
 
See Kansas Administrative Regulation 91-31-32, and Kansas Health Education Standards.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation Unlawful Under Bill
Senate Bill 163, introduced in January 2007 and sent to the Senate Committee on Federal and State Affairs, would have amended the Kansas Act against Discrimination to include unlawful discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The bill died in committee.
 
Abstinence Plus Education Act Introduced
Senate Bill 508 would have required each school district to provide a “comprehensive education program in human sexuality.” This bill would have required that teachers have “appropriate academic preparation or in-service training to develop a basic knowledge of and sensitivity to the area of human sexuality” and that curricula and related materials be factually and medically accurate as well as age-appropriate. Additionally, it would have created a statewide “opt-out” policy regarding sexuality education classes. The bill was introduced in February 2006 and passed the Senate. It was placed in the House Committee on Federal and State Affairs, where it later died.
 
 
 
Kansas’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[2]
·        In 2007, 45% of female high school students and 45% of male high school students in Kansas reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 5% of female high school students and 9% of male high school students in Kansas reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students nationwide.
·
·        In 2007, 14% of female high school students and 17% of male high school students in Kansas reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 36% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students in Kansas reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 63% of females and 70% of males in Kansas reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 55% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 19% of females and 15% of males in Kansas reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 13% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 21% of females and 31% of males in Kansas reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 18% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
·        In 2007, 85% of high school students in Kansas reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 90% of high school students nationwide.
 
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
·        Kansas received $337,110 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2008.
·        The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups.
·        In Kansas, sub-grantees are required to make the match.
·        The Kansas Department of Health and Environment manages the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding.
·        There are six Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantees in the state: two local health departments and four community-based organizations (including one faith-based).
 
Status of the Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Program
In August 2008, the Kansas Secretary Department of Health, Roderick Bremby, sent a letter to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) informing the department that the state would no longer apply for Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage dollars. The letter stated, “While the department takes its responsibilities to the citizens of the State very seriously and seeks out federal and other sources of funding as available, it is also our responsibility to promote effective and efficient use of both federal and state dollars.” The letter referenced the Mathematica study which found abstinence-only-until-marriage programs were ineffective in delaying sexual initiation or reducing the number of sexual partners.[3] This decision will go into effect for Fiscal Year 2009 funding cycle.
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Kansas:
Abstinence Education, Inc., $20,000 (2008), $770,800 (CBAE 2005–2008) and $600,000 (CBAE 2008–2013)
Abstinence Education, Inc. is a non-profit organization that describes itself as, “Pro-Life - Pro-Family - Pro-Youth - Pro-Community - Pro Character Education.” The organization, which receives both Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funds and a CBAE grant, works to educate “communities, parents and youth on the value of abstinence until marriage” and abstaining from other “harmful behaviors” including the use of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, and pornography.[4] In Fiscal Year 2006, 95 percent of the organization’s budget came from abstinence-only-until-marriage dollars.[5]
      Abstinence Education, Inc. runs the “Pure and Simple Lifestyle” abstinence program primarily for high school students. This peer mentoring program recruits abstinent, college-aged young adults to mentor high school students. Pure and Simple Lifestyle conducts presentations for classes, after-school programs, community youth programs, church youth groups, and summer programs. It developed the curriculum Pure and Simple Choice, which includes eight dramatic episodes that are presented to program participants.[6]
      The Abstinence Education website offers guidelines that provide a biased comparison between comprehensive sex education programs and abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. For example, the site explains that an instructor of a comprehensive sex education program “presents information…based on the assumption that presence of sexual curiosity justifies providing the information” while the abstinence-only-until-marriage instructor presents information solely on a ‘need to know’ basis dependent “on student group’s [sic] social characteristics and ethnic/gender diversity.” Another comparison explains that a comprehensive sex education instructor “is required to maintain a ‘non-judgmental’ educational approach that disallows correction of student thinking that may result in harmful and unhealthy behavior” while an abstinence-only-until-marriage instructor “is obligated to correct a student’s thinking that may result in harmful and unhealthy behavior.”[7]
      Finally, according to the comparison, comprehensive sex education programs hold the premise that “birth control options, abstinence being an option, must be presented early since sexual curiosity begins early; and, sexual experimentation before marriage is natural and normal behavior,” while abstinence-only-until-marriage programs assert that “natural sexual curiosity develops as the person proceeds through stages of psychosexual development. Sexual experimentation is held in check through the person’s use of their intellect and free will.”[8]  
 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees
·        There are two CBAE grantees in Kansas: Abstinence Education, Inc. and Haven Center, Inc.
·        There are no AFLA grantees in Kansas.
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of federal CBAE and AFLA funding in Kansas:
Haven Center, Inc., $652,468 (CBAE 2005-2008)
Haven Center, Inc. conducts several abstinence-only-until-marriage programs including IGNITE L.A.P.S. (Leadership and Abstinence for Positive Lifestyles), Y.A.P. (Youth Alternatives Program), and Enhancement Support. IGNITE L.A.P.S. “teaches teens the benefits of sexual integrity until marriage,” and consists of five different phases, or laps: education, enhancement, equipment, empowerment, and marathon club (youth mentorship). In Fiscal Year 2006, 96 percent of the organization’s budget came from CBAE dollars.[9]
 
 
Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2008

Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
Length of Grant
Amount of Grant
Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
 
$337,110 federal
$255,541 state
 
Title V
Abstinence Education, Inc. (formerly known as Abstinence Education Consultants, Inc.)
$20,000
Title V sub-grantee
DUAL GRANTEE
2005–2008
2008–2013
$770,800
 
$600,000
CBAE
 
CBAE
Catholic Community Services
$24,000
Title V sub-grantee
Community Health Organization Committee
$21,784
Title V sub-grantee
Johnson County Health Department
$22,500
Title V sub-grantee
Lyon County Health Department
$37,500
Title V sub-grantee
Ulysses School District (USD-214)
 $15,552
 
Title V sub-grantee
Haven Center, Inc.
2005–2008
$652,468
 
 
 
CBAE

 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[10]
Ilene Meyer
Children and Families Section
Bureau for Children, Youth and Families
Kansas Department of Health and Environment
1000 SW Jackson, Suite 220
Topeka, KS 66612
Phone: (785) 291-3053
 
 
Kansas Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

ACLU of Kansas and Western Missouri
3601 Main Street
Kansas City, MO 64111
Phone: (816) 756-3113
 
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Kansas and Mid-Missouri
4401 West 109th Street, Suite 200
Overland Park, KS 66211
Phone: (913) 312-5100
 
ProKanDo PAC
P.O. Box 8249
Wichita, KS 67208
Phone: (316) 691-2002
 
 

       
Kansas Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Abstinence Education Consultants, Inc.
3301 West 13th Street N
Wichita, KS 67203
Phone: (316) 688-0840
 
Kansas For Life
2501 East Central
Wichita, KS 67214
Phone: (316) 687-LIFE
 
Operation Rescue West
P.O. Box 782888
Wichita, KS 67278
Phone: (316) 683-6790
 
Operation Save America-Wichita
P.O. Box 497
Kechi, KS 67067
Phone: (316) 612-3500
 

       
Newspapers in Kansas[11]

Lawrence Journal-World
Newsroom
609 New Hampshire Street
Lawrence, KS 66044
Phone: (785) 843-1000
 
Manhattan Mercury
Newsroom
318 N. 5th Street
Manhattan, KS 66502
Phone: (785) 776-2300
 
Salina Journal
Newsroom
333 S. 4th Street
Salina, KS 67401
Phone: (785) 823-6363
 
Topeka Capital-Journal
Newsroom
616 S.E. Jefferson Street
Topeka, KS 66607
Phone: (785) 295-1188
 
The Wichita Eagle
Newsroom
825 E. Douglas Avenue
Wichita, KS 67202
Phone: (316) 268-6000
 

       
 


[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2008 began on October 1, 2007 and ended on September 30, 2008. 
[2] Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2007,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57.SS-4 (6 June 2008), accessed 4 June 2008, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>.
[3] Christopher Trenholm, et. al., “Impacts of Four Title V, Section 510 Abstinence Education Programs: Final Report,” (Trenton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., April 2007), accessed 6 September 2007, <www.mathematica-mpr.com/publications/pdfs/impactabstinence.pdf>.
[4] “Our Mission Statement,” Abstinence Education, Inc., accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.abstainpureandsimple.org/abeducation.htm>.
[5] Abstinence Education, IRS 990 Form, Fiscal Year 2006, p.1.
[6] “Our Programs,” Abstinence Education, Inc., accessed 18 October 2008, <http://www.abstainpureandsimple.org/abeducation/programs.htm>.
[7] Ibid.
[8] Ibid.
[9] The Haven Center, IRS 990 Form, Fiscal Year 2006, p. 1.
[10] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[11] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.
National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education