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Arizona State Profile Fiscal Year 2008

The Department of Health Services and community-based organizations in Arizona received $5,185,998 in federal funds for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in Fiscal Year 2008.[1]

(Click Here to View a PDF Version of this Profile)

Arizona Sexuality Education Law and Policy
Arizona does not have a law that requires schools to teach sexuality education or sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV education. However, Arizona law does state that if a school chooses to teach these topics, instruction must be age-appropriate and must stress abstinence. Further, if a school chooses to teach HIV education, such instruction must be medically accurate, but cannot promote a “homosexual lifestyle,” portray “homosexuality as a positive alternative life-style,” or “suggest that some methods of sex are safe methods of homosexual sex.”
Arizona Administrative Code R7-2-303 states that schools may “provide a specific elective lesson or lessons concerning sex education as a supplement to the health course of study.” In order for a student to take the class, the school must have the “written request of the student’s parents or guardian.” In addition, the school must:
 
  • provide an alternative elective lesson;
  • only spend a limited amount of time on sex education;
  • teach the class in gender-divided classrooms;
  • not grade the classes, require no homework, and not retain any evaluation of the class;
  • not include any “tests, psychological inventories, surveys, or examinations containing any questions about the student’s or his parents’ personal beliefs or practices in sex, family life, morality, values or religion;” and
  • have the lessons approval of the local governing board.
 
The local governing board:       
 
  • must be representative of the district;
  • must review all instructional materials;
  • hold at least two public hearings on the matter; and
  • allow all materials for this class to be viewed by the public.
 
Arizona’s Comprehensive Health Education Standards do not include STD/HIV education. In Arizona parents or guardians may remove their children from STD/HIV education classes. This is referred to as an “opt-out” policy. Additionally, the state requires written consent for any sexuality education class. This is referred to as an “opt-in” policy. See Arizona Revised Statutes Sections 15-716, 15-102 and R7-2-303.
 
 
Recent Legislation
Legislation to Amend State Statute on Sex Education
House Bill 2708, introduced in January 2008, would have amended the state statute on human sexuality education by omitting the policy that requires schools that choose to teach HIV education to ensure that the instruction does not promote “a homosexual life-style,” portray “homosexuality as a positive alternative life-style,” or suggest “that some methods of sex are safe methods of homosexual sex.” The amendment would have also prohibited parents from withdrawing their child from class instruction on HIV and AIDS. The bill was referred to the House Committee on Education K-12 and the House Committee on Rules. The bill failed to move out of committee and died. An identical bill, SB 1342, was introduced in the Senate in January 2008. It was referred to the Senate Committee on Education K-12 and the Senate Committee on Rules and also died after failing to move out of committee.
 
 
Arizona’s Youth: Statistical Information of Note[2]
  • In 2007, 45% of female high school students and 47% of male high school students in Arizona reported ever having had sexual intercourse compared to 46% of female high school students and 50% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, 4% of female high school students and 7% of male high school students in Arizona reported having had sexual intercourse before age 13 compared to 4% of female high school students and 10% of male high school students nationwide.

  • In 2007, 13% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students in Arizona reported having had four or more lifetime sexual partners compared to 12% of female high school students and 18% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, 35% of female high school students and 33% of male high school students in Arizona reported being currently sexually active (defined as having had sexual intercourse in the three months prior to the survey) compared to 36% of female high school students and 34% of male high school students nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 47% of females and 65% of males in Arizona reported having used condoms the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 55% of females and 69% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 15% of females and 13% of males in Arizona reported having used birth control pills the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 19% of females and 13% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, among those high school students who reported being currently sexually active, 20% of females and 35% of males in Arizona reported having used alcohol or drugs the last time they had sexual intercourse compared to 18% of females and 28% of males nationwide.
 
  • In 2007, 79% of high school students in Arizona reported having been taught about AIDS/HIV in school compared to 90% of high school students nationwide
 
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding
  • Arizona received $1,034,776 in federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Fiscal Year 2008.
  • The Title V abstinence-only-until marriage grant requires states to provide three state-raised dollars or the equivalent in services for every four federal dollars received. The state match may be provided in part or in full by local groups.
  • In Arizona, the match is provided through state general funds in the amount of $1,500,000.
  • The department of health disburses the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding.
  • There are ten Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage sub-grantees in the state: one county health department, one cooperative extension office, one for-profit health provider, and seven community-based organizations.
  • The grants are primarily used to fund abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in schools.
 
Title V Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Funding Status
Arizona will no longer participate in the Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program after Fiscal Year 2008. On January 18, 2008, former Governor Janet Napolitano (D) made the decision to eliminate the funds from the Fiscal Year 2009 General Fund Executive Budget, stating that “[Arizona should not fund] an educational system that does not educate.” Governor Napolitano made the public rejection of Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage federal funding for abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, asserting her refusal to apply for any money that does not fund “real, complete sex education in our schools.”[3] This decision will go into effect for Fiscal Year 2009. 
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of federal Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Arizona:
 
Arizona-Mexico Border Health Foundation, $78,129 (2008), $99,943 (2008) and $550,000 (CBAE 2008–2013)  
The mission of the Arizona-Mexico Border Health Foundation is to, “Address low-income communities and high-risk underserved populations throughout the United States and its territories.”[4]
      The Foundation’s Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage program targets Latino communities through the use of “promotores,” community members who distribute information to community residents. Promotores use information from the Worth the Wait curriculum to deliver their abstinence message.[5] SIECUS reviewed Worth the Wait and found that it covers some important topics related to sexuality such as puberty, anatomy, and sexual abuse, and that the curriculum is based on reliable sources of data. Despite these strengths, Worth the Wait relies on messages of fear, discourages contraceptive use, and promotes biased views of gender, marriage, and pregnancy options. For example, the curriculum explains, “teenage sexual activity can create a multitude of medical, legal, and economic problems not only for the individuals having sex but for society as a whole.”[6]
 
Arizona Youth Partnership, $208,567 (2008), $120,000 (2008), $100,000 (2008) and $600,000 (CBAE 2007–2012)
Arizona Youth Partnership, a non-profit organization focused on preventing risky behaviors in youth, receives both Title V abstinence-only-until-marriage and CBAE funding. The organization provides services to youth and families in rural communities and Native American reservations in Arizona. Currently, Arizona Youth Partnership operates in 29 communities in nine counties located in southern Arizona.[7]
      The organization’s abstinence-only-until-marriage program involves ten community projects, which operate in seven Arizona rural counties.[8] According to the organization, a total of 6,567 students participated in the program with 82 percent of participants committing to remaining abstinent until marriage. Such commitments are often referred to as virginity pledges. Research has found that 88 percent of young people who took a virginity pledge ultimately had sexual intercourse before marriage. Under certain conditions these pledges may help some adolescents delay sexual intercourse. When they work, pledges help this select group of adolescents delay the onset of sexual intercourse for an average of 18 months—far short of marriage. Researchers found that pledges only worked when taken by a small group of students. Pledges taken by a whole class were ineffective. More importantly, the studies also found that those young people who took a pledge were one-third less likely to use contraception when they did become sexually active than their peers who had not pledged. These teens are therefore more vulnerable to the risks of unprotected sexual activity such as unintended pregnancy and STDs, including HIV/AIDS. Further research has confirmed that although some students who take pledges delay intercourse, ultimately they are equally as likely to contract an STD as their non-pledging peers. The study also found that STD rates were higher in communities where a significant proportion (over 20 percent) of the young people had taken virginity pledges.[9]
      The Arizona Youth Partnership uses the Choosing the Best curriculum for middle school students and WAIT Training for students in grades nine through 12.[10] The Choosing the Best series is one of the more popular abstinence-only-until-marriage programs in the country. The series is comprised of a number of curricula for students from sixth grade through high school: Choosing the Best WAY, Choosing the Best PATH, Choosing the Best LIFE, Choosing the Best JOURNEY, and Choosing the Best SOULMATE. The series has been recently revised and the information about STDs is now medically accurate. However, Choosing the Best curricula continue to promote heterosexual marriage, rely on messages of fear and shame, and include biases about gender, sexual orientation, and pregnancy options. For example, Choosing the Best PATH asks students to brainstorm the “emotional consequences” of premarital sex. Suggested answers include “guilt, feeling scared, ruined relationships, broken emotional bonds.”[11]
SIECUS also reviewed WAIT Training and found that it contained little medical or biological information and almost no information about STDs, including HIV/AIDS. Instead, it contains information and statistics about marriage, many of which are outdated and not supported by scientific research. It also contains messages of fear and shame and biased views of gender, sexual orientation, and family type. For example, WAIT Training explains, “men sexually are like microwaves and women sexually are like crockpots….A woman is stimulated more by touch and romantic words. She is far more attracted by a man’s personality while a man is stimulated by sight. A man is usually less discriminating about those to whom he is physically attracted.”[12]
 
The Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, $107,929 (2008)
The Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix operates six crisis pregnancy centers in the metro Phoenix area. Crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) typically advertise as providing medical services to women facing unintended pregnancies but use anti-abortion propaganda, misinformation, and fear and shame tactics to dissuade women from exercising their right to choose. The organization’s website includes a quote from the New Testament: “The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.”[13] The website also tells women, “Although unplanned pregnancies are a frightening prospect full of many uncertainties, being pregnant is also an exciting time full of wonder, truly one of God’s greatest gifts to women.”[14]
The centers do not provide abortion services or referrals for abortion, nor do they provide, or give referrals for, contraceptives to single women. The CPCs’ policy on abortion states, “First and foremost, we believe in the sanctity of human life. Since we affirm that all life is created by God and precious to him, and humans are created in the image of God and thus hold the greatest value, we therefore have the highest reverence and esteem for human life. Thus, we place the highest value (as does God) on life from its beginning at conception until its end at natural death.”[15]
      Information for teens on the organization’s websites encourages abstinence from all sexual activity, which involves any intended behavior from which sexual arousal or gratification are derived. This includes “masturbation, mutual masturbation, fondling, the use of sex toys, and the viewing of pornography.”[16] The organization warns teens that sex is dangerous and has the potential to destroy if it takes place outside of marriage, “Just as fire was made for a fireplace, and is only safe when contained within strict boundaries, so sex was made for marriage, and is only ‘safe’ when practiced by a committed, faithful, married couple,” the site reads.[17] The site also asserts that sex outside of marriage will destroy any relationship: “Like a fire that has been kindled in your living room instead of the fireplace, sex becomes a good gift gone bad because it bonds two people who haven’t completely committed themselves to be faithful to each other like one does in marriage. As the fire will soon burn your house down, sex outside of marriage will soon destroy your relationship.”[18]
      Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix provides abstinence-only-until-marriage programs to middle and high school students. The center uses two curricula, Worth the Wait for middle school students and Aspire, with the supplement, Passion & Principles, for high school students.
ASPIRE: Live your life. Be free. is based on one set of values and opinions—that marriage should be everyone’s ultimate goal and that sex outside of marriage is wrong—which it tries to pass off as universally held truths. In an effort to convince students that these opinions are facts, the curriculum provides incomplete and biased information, promotes fear and shame, and undermines young people’s confidence in their own decision-making abilities. For example, students are asked which life decision—college, career, or marriage—will have the most impact on their life. The answer is marriage because “College is for a few years, and you may have a number of careers. But marriage is for life.”[19]  
      Passion & Principles is a five-hour curriculum that includes such topics as “Worth Waiting for,” ”Risky Behaviors,” and ”Love Versus Lust.” In addition, the center’s abstinence-until-marriage programs teach students about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and condom failure rates. [20] The programs, however, do not provide information on the effectiveness of contraception in preventing pregnancy or the transmission of STDs.
 
Pima Prevention Partnership, $99,374 (2008), $284,089 (2008), $726,652 (CBAE 2005–2008), and $475,000 (AFLA 2007–2012)
Pima Prevention Partnership, referred to as “The Partnership,” operates in Tucson and Phoenix and provides a broad range of community-based, clinical, and professional services.[21] The organization receives grant awards from each of the three federal abstinence-only-until-marriage funding streams.
      The Partnership runs the “Project Pledge” abstinence program for young people ages 12–18, which “uses federally approved curricula to increase the percentage of 5,000 middle and high school student [sic] who commit to sexual abstinence before marriage.” [22] The program’s purpose is to “reduce the incidence of out-of-wedlock pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases among 12–18 year-old teens.”[23]
Project Pledge provides five- to ten-hour abstinence classes and serves 7,000 students per year. It also offers peer mentoring support and instruction on parenting skills. The program uses the Choosing the Best curricula.
      The Project Pledge website is designed to serve as a central component of the program, providing information for students, parents, teachers, and legislators. The website, however, offers misleading and inaccurate information to teens. The website’s response to the question, “Are contraceptives effective?” is: “No, because you can still catch diseases and sometimes get pregnant. The only safe way to avoid disease and pregnancy is through abstinence.” Another question asks about the consequences of having sex. In response the website states, “Possibly could get pregnant or catch diseases and experience a damaged reputation, a sense of guilt and shame, physical pain. This can lead to a feeling a [sic] being alone or distracted.” This information is clearly designed to scare young people and make them feel guilty rather than to educate them. Moreover, Project Pledge’s website seems intent on discouraging condom and contraceptive use among young people.  
      Another section of the website gives teens the option of signing a virginity pledge in which they swear to remain abstinent until marriage.
 
 
Community-Based Abstinence Education (CBAE) and Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) Grantees
  • There are five CBAE grantees in Arizona: one crisis pregnancy center and four community-based organizations.
  • There is one AFLA grantee: Pima Prevention Partnership.
 
SIECUS has compiled some examples of the use of CBAE and AFLA abstinence-only-until-marriage funding in Arizona:
 
Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc., $599,601 (CBAE 2006–2010)
Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc. operates a number of youth programs that provide “youth opportunities to develop social and physical skills.” The programs focus on youth development and the prevention of risky behavior, including “how to say ‘no’ to drugs, gangs, alcohol, tobacco and sex before marriage.”[24]
The organization’s abstinence program, “Pure Power,” operates in Maricopa County public schools. A section on the Pure Power website titled, “It Works” lists the benefits of remaining abstinent. For example, the website lists being confident and respected as “positive emotional benefits for abstinence:” The website states, “Confident: The strongest people are leaders, not followers,” and “Respected: You earn respect by standing out, not blending in. When your convictions are strong enough, you will gain the respect of others, as well as yourself.” The website also includes “Healthy” as a benefit of abstinence, stating “Knowing you’re not infected with an STD or not pregnant. Feeling healthy positively affects your life!”[25] The website goes on to say: “By waiting, you are faithful to your spouse even before you meet them! By practicing the virtues involved in waiting, such as faithfulness, self-control, modesty, good judgment, courage, and genuine respect for yourself and others - you are developing the kind of character that will make you a good marriage partner and attract the kind of person you would like to marry.”[26] While it is encouraging that Pure Power is trying to look at abstinence from a positive perspective, the implication in these statements is that young people who are sexually active are not confident, respected, or healthy, and that they lack virtues such as self-control, good judgment, and courage.
 
 
Federal and State Funding for Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs in FY 2008
 

Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Grantee
Length of Grant
Amount of Grant
Type of Grant (includes Title V, CBAE, AFLA, and other funds)
Arizona Department of Health Services
 
$1,034,776 federal
$1,500,000 state
Title V
Arizona-Mexico Border Health Foundation
$78,129
Title V sub-grantee
TRIPLE GRANTEE
$99,943
Title V sub-grantee
 
2008–2013
$550,000
CBAE
Arizona Psychology Services
$112,889
Title V sub-grantee
Arizona Youth Partnership
$100,000
Title V sub-grantee
QUADRUPLE GRANTEE
$120,224
 
Title V sub-grantee
 
$208,567
Title V sub-grantee
2007–2012
$600,000
CBAE
Catholic Charities Community Services–Maricopa County
$173,522
Title V sub-grantee
Catholic Charities Community Services-Yavapai County
$198,310
Title V sub-grantee
Child and Family Resources, Inc.
$99,157
 
Title V sub-grantee
DUAL GRANTEE
$44,072
 
Title V sub-grantee
 
Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix
$107,929
 
 
Title V sub-grantee
 
 
Pima Prevention Partnership
$284,089
 
Title V sub-grantee
 
QUADRUPLE GRANTEE
$99,374
 
Title V sub-grantee
2005–2008
$726,652
 
CBAE
 
2007–2012
$475,000
AFLA
Pinal County Division of Public Health
$299,066
Title V sub-grantee
University of Arizona, Maricopa Cooperative Extension
$114,630
Title V sub-grantee
Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc.
2006–2010
$599,601
CBAE
Catholic Charities Community Services
2007–2012
$600,000
CBAE
Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Tucson
2008–2013
$599,969
CBAE

 
 
Adolescent Health Contact[27]
Dorothy Hastings
Education Services Manager
Abstinence Education Program
Arizona Department of Health Services
150 N. 18th Avenue, Suite 320
Phoenix, AZ 85007
Phone: (602) 364-1421
 
 
Arizona Organizations that Support Comprehensive Sexuality Education

ACLU of Arizona
P.O. Box 17148
Phoenix, AZ 85011
 
The Arizona Coalition on Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenting
4710 North 16th Place
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Phone: (602) 265-4337
Arizona Family Planning Council
2920 North 24th Avenue, Suite 26
Phoenix, AZ 85015
Phone: (602) 258-5777
Arizona Human Rights Fund and Foundation
P.O. Box 25044
Phoenix, AZ 85002
Phone: (602) 650-0900
 
NARAL Pro-Choice Arizona
P.O. Box 45452
Phoenix, AZ 85064
Phone: (480) 834-3274
Planned Parenthood of Central and Northern Arizona
5651 North 7th Street
Phoenix, AZ 85014
Phone: (602) 277-PLAN www.plannedparenthood.org/ppaz

 
Arizona Organizations that Oppose Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Alliance Defense Fund
15333 North Pima Road, Suite 165
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone: (800) TELL-ADF
 
The Center for Arizona Policy
7227 North 16th Street, Suite 250
Phoenix, AZ 85020
Phone: (602) 424-2525 
 
Goldwater Institute
500 East Coronado Road
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Phone: (602) 462-5000
 

 
    
Newspapers in Arizona[28]

Arizona Daily Star
Newsroom
4850 S. Park Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85714
Phone: (520) 806-7754
 
Arizona Daily Sun
Newsroom
1751 S. Thompson Street
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Phone: (928) 556-2241
The Arizona Republic
Newsoom
200 E. Van Buren Street
Phoenix, AZ 85004
Phone: (602) 444-8000
 
East Valley Tribune
Newsroom
120 W. First Avenue
Mesa, AZ 85210
Phone: (480) 898-6554
Tucson Citizen
Newsroom
4850 S. Park Avenue
Tucson, AZ 85714
Phone: (520) 573-4561
 

 


[1]This refers to the federal government’s fiscal year, which begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. The fiscal year is designated by the calendar year in which it ends; for example, Fiscal Year 2008 began on October 1, 2007 and ended on September 30, 2008. 
[2] Unless otherwise cited, all statistical information comes from: Danice K. Eaton, et. al., “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2007,” Surveillance Summaries, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 57.SS-4 (6 June 2008), accessed 4 June 2008, <http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm>.
[3] “ACLU of Arizona Applauds Governor’s Rejection of Abstinence-Only Funds.” ACLU-AZ, 18 January 2008, accessed 3 April 2008, <http://www.aclu.org/reproductiverights/sexed/34529prs20080118.html>.
[4] “Border Health Foundation,” Arizona-Mexico Border Health Foundation, 23 November 2008, <http://www.borderhealthfoundation.org/>.
[5] Sheryl Kornman, “2 Groups Get $1.4 Million To Help Prevent Teen Pregnancies,” Tucson Citizen, 15 July 3004 [sic], accessed 19 October 2008, <http://www.pyp.com/abonly_news.html>.
[6] Patricia Sulak, Worth the Wait (Temple, TX: Scott & White Memorial Hospital, 2003). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of Worth the Wait at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
[7] “Mission Statement,” Arizona Youth Partnership, accessed 5 October 2008, <http://www.azyp.org/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1>.
[8] “About Us,” Choices 2007, Arizona Youth Partnership, accessed 5 October 2008, <http://www.choices.azyp.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2&Itemid=9>.
[9] Peter Bearman and Hannah Brückner “Promising the Future: Virginity Pledges and the Transition to First Intercourse.” American Journal of Sociology 106.4 (2001): 859-912; Peter Bearman and Hannah Brückner, “After the promise: The STD consequences of adolescent virginity pledges,” Journal of Adolescent Health 36.4 (2005): 271-278.
[10] Horizons newsletter, Arizona Youth Partnership (September 2006), accessed on 5 October 2008, <http://www.azyp.org/September 2006.pdf>.
[11] Bruce Cook, Choosing the Best (Marietta, GA: Choosing the Best, Inc., 2001-2007).
[12]  Joneen Krauth-Mackenzie, WAIT (Why Am I Tempted) Training, Second Edition (Greenwood Village, CO: WAIT Training, undated).  For more information, see SIECUS’ review of WAIT Training at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
[13] “Topics Especially for Women,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/women.shtml>.
[14] “Women: Pregnancy,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/pregnancy/>.
[15] “Pregnancy/Abortion Info: CPC’s Policy Regarding Abortion,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/pregnancy/abortion_info/>.
[16] “Sex,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/sexual_health/sex/>.
[17] Ibid.
[18] “Reasons to Wait,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/sexual_health/reasons_to_wait/>.
[19] Scott Phelps, Aspire. Live your life. Be Free. (Arlington, IL: Abstinence & Marriage Resources, 2006). For more information, see SIECUS’ review of Aspire at <http://www.communityactionkit.org/curricula_reviews.html>.
[20] “History and Approach,” Crisis Pregnancy Centers of Phoenix, accessed 1 October 2008, <http://www.cpcphoenix.org/resources/curricula/history_approach.shtml>.
[21] “About Us,” The Partnership: creating conditions for change, accessed 4 October 2008, <http://thepartnership.us/About.aspx>.
[22] “Project Pledge and B-Unique,” The Partnership: creating conditions for change, accessed 4 October 2008, <http://thepartnership.us/Youth/Abstinence.aspx>.
[23] Ibid.
[24] “Homepage,” Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc., accessed 6 October 2008, <http://www.afbt.org/>.
[25] “It Works,” Pure Power website, Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc., accessed 6 October 2008, <http://www.afbt.org/purepower/it_works.htm>.
[26] “Rewards of Waiting,” Pure Power website, Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Inc., accessed 6 October 2008, <http://www.afbt.org/purepower/rewards.htm>.
[27] SIECUS has identified this person as a state-based contact for information on adolescent health and if applicable, abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. 
[28] This section is a list of major newspapers in your state with contact information for their newsrooms. This list is by no means exhaustive and does not contain the local level newspapers which are integral to getting your message out to your community. SIECUS strongly urges you to follow stories about the issues that concern you on the national, state, and local level by using an internet news alert service such as Google alerts, becoming an avid reader of your local papers, and establishing relationships with reporters who cover your issues. For more information on how to achieve your media goals visit the SIECUS Community Action Kit.

 

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